Food...

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Zoe Newsam
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Food...

Post by Zoe Newsam » Thu Mar 10, 2005 9:55 am

What do you take on expeditions for lunch and dinner?

I spent 2 months last summer eating oatcakes & tinned mackerel for lunch every day, & am a bit bored with it- any suggestions?

Food for a 2-week expedition (packing it all at the start) -ideas?

Recipes please- must be indestructible & non-perishable!

Zoe

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Mark R
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Post by Mark R » Thu Mar 10, 2005 10:13 am

By law, all outdoor meals must commence with a steaming cup of packet noodles.
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the slag of all snacks

Post by tpage » Thu Mar 10, 2005 10:15 am

Well.. this is an easy one. Im quite fond of tinned fish (species unimportant) . But Pot noodles, pepparami sausages and Malt whisky are the usual staple- Tony
(Ps beer if there is room)

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Post by sub5rider » Thu Mar 10, 2005 11:45 am

Morrisons do a product called "Pocket Pitta" These are small (6"?) pitta breads, pre sliced packed in sixes in robust semi-vacuum packs. Once opened the packs can be resealedwith duct tape and the contents stay fresh for 3 days. I never take any other form of bread......
Tasty fillings:

Curry
Fried spam
Packet noodles
Fried/scambled eggs
Tuna in various "sauces"
Anything really, that's not too runny, and you can dunk 'em in your cuppasoup too..

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Re: Food...

Post by Bertie.. » Thu Mar 10, 2005 12:20 pm

zoenewsam wrote:Recipes please- must be indestructible & non-perishable!

Zoe
sounds like my wife's cooking ;-) LOL, I'll be telling mother-in-law jokes next...

In the past, I've made up my own sachets of herbs, spices and stock cubes for a variety of curries, chinese, thai and mexican dishes so that I can just fry the spices a little, then bung in some dried food (pasta, rice, etc) add some water, simmer for a while and bobs you're uncle. I'm not averse to using dried meat or veggie-alternatives (soya-mix etc) and adding tinned veg. A bit like the old vesta meals, but much nicer and without the cr*p additives/ingredients!

You can do the same with breakie, have bags containing cereal, dried milk powder, sugar etc then just add water..

Bertie..

p.s. almost forgot to add the obligatory winebox bladder complete with contents, although make sure you remember to pack it - halfway across to the Isles of Scilly is not the time to remember the 15 litres of red you've left behind in Cornwall...!

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MikeB
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Nosh

Post by MikeB » Thu Mar 10, 2005 12:33 pm

Some receipe ideas linked from the Almanac / Camping & OUtdoors.

Fresh stuff is going to be a problem over 2 weeks! Can you resupply? Like Bertie, I usually mix ingredients for muesuli type b/fasts - I've also started carrying tubes of condensed milk - yummy.

Lunch - tend to use rolls / pita / crispbreads - tubed plain cheese stuff makes a good butter/marge substitute(ish). assorted tins, spreads, cheese etc on top. Packet soup as well.

Dinner - fresh chicken / meat for first two days - seems to keep ok if suitable packaged and kept in the bottom of the boat, below the waterline to keep it cool - then rely on packets / tins for a day or so and then go veggie! Smoked sausage thingies last quite well if you must have some form of processed animal.

Many butchers will vac-pack steaks and the like if you ask them. Dried, sliced mushrooms are easier to take than fresh.

Pasta / rice / assorted veggies etc mixed in make it more palatable. Chile flavoured olive oil's nice to add flavour to cooking things.

Of course, there is also the increasingly popular "credit-card-kayaking" concept whereby one paddles from pub / hotel to another pub / hotel and so on! LOL.

Finally - you could always do some fishing. Mind you, having only caught fish once in 5 years (!!), thats maybe not too reliable. Freshly caught mackrel fillets fried (or grilled) takes some beating. If you manage to lure something larger onto your hook, then fillet and grill in the Canadian manner over embers. Very yum.

Must remember to leave room in the boat for beer / whisk(e)y of course.

Mike.
Last edited by MikeB on Thu Mar 10, 2005 12:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Zoe Newsam
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Post by Zoe Newsam » Thu Mar 10, 2005 12:45 pm

MikeB wrote
Fresh stuff is going to be a problem over 2 weeks! Can you resupply?
The trip is to the Lofoten Islands, in Norway, so I'm sure there are places to resupply, but it may also be ridiculously expensive, and on the West Coast there almost certainly won't be anywhere. In the past I've used tins, noodles, rice etc for dinner, and oatcakes and either tinned mackerel/ tuna or squeezy cheese for lunch. Breakfast is pre-mixed muesli & dried milk. I'm really just looking for new ideas. The guys I'm going with are veggie...

Was thinking of pasta with dried mushrooms, sun-dried toms, olives, etc...

Anyone got any other dehydrated ideas? Because it's for 2 weeks it'll need to be lightweight.

Thought about tortillas for lunch, but fillings??

Tesco last night didn't give much inspiration!

Zoe

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Post by Guest » Thu Mar 10, 2005 12:48 pm

Of course, there is also the increasingly popular "credit-card-kayaking" concept whereby one paddles from pub / hotel to another pub / hotel and so on! LOL.

Sounds good to me, any recommendations?

Cheers

Gavin

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MikeB
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Post by MikeB » Thu Mar 10, 2005 1:02 pm

Norway - you'll maybe already have read this? http://www.seapaddler.co.uk/interest1112.htm - these guys seemed to do ok food-wise.

Credit-card-kayaking - Loch Leven Hotel to Port Appin Hotel would be rather pleasant! The Three Chimneys on Syke would be even more pleasant, but would really require one to have a Gold Card - LOL.

Various other waterside hotels on Skye, notably the Sligachan Inn and there is also a pleasant hotel on Raasay. Dornie has a pub/hotel within reasonable staggering distance of the sea that is surprisingly gastronomic.

The Lord of the Isles at Croabh Haven is worth the trouble as well. So's the Loch Melfort Hotel.

Mike.

Helen M (not logged in)

Food

Post by Helen M (not logged in) » Thu Mar 10, 2005 1:15 pm

Zoe - don't forget the chocolate!

Luv H -x

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Post by Guest » Thu Mar 10, 2005 3:15 pm

If you're doing a lot of this sort of thing, then a home dehydrator is a good investment.

Before we walked the Pacific Crest Trail, during which we carried up to 8 days of food on our backs, we dehydrated loads meals. We'd add water early in the day, and by evening they'd be reconstituted.

Most successul were the tomato sauce based meals (with various extras like beans, corn, onions etc) with tuna based sauces (with peas, corn etc) a close second. Cook them with rice, noodles or pasta and they give flavour and protein to the carbs. The sauces dry into "leathers", pyable sheets of sauce, which pack small and light, and keep ages providing you don't cook with any oil (it goes rancid). It's worth carrying extra olive oil to add fat. To all of this, we'd add fresh garlic and fresh onion when possible.

You can also dehydrate apples and other fruit into great chewy snacks.

For breakfast, I prefer granola (which is toasted) to muesli because granola can be eaten dry if necessary.

Lunch - a bread based product with a fat based product just about covers it! Crackers, crisp-bread and especially tortillas are good. Spread on that Tartex veg. pate (from a tube), Primula cheese (again, from a tube) or peanut butter. In the US we found powdered Humous, which when mixed with olive oil tasted wonderful. I haven't seen it here.

Of course, for the first day out from anywhere, we'd carry REAL food.

Simon

(more on our PCT hike at www.SimonWillis.co.uk)

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Post by Simon Willis » Thu Mar 10, 2005 3:27 pm

Sorry, I thought I was logged-in when I wrote that last post.

The link is here www.simonwillis.co.uk

If you want to know more about making your own dehydrated food, I'd be happy to go into detail.
S

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No cook cookery

Post by Jonathan. » Thu Mar 10, 2005 3:47 pm

I love cooking, but when camping I want good quality, high energy food I can have ready as quickly as possible. That means stuff that either takes little or no preparation, or is already cooked.

In the minimum-cooking category, I put porridge and cous cous. Cous cous is far quicker than rice or potatoes and can be very tasty. To cook, you just toast the grains in hot oil - olive for preference - and then pour on boiling water. A couple of minutes later: Voilà! - it's ready.

And if you do the toasting at home when you can mix in Marigold stock powder, dried mushrooms, dried peppers, herbs and so on, then cooking need take little longer than it takes to boil water. Ratio is one cup of cous cous to two of water, though for one person you'll need half a cup or less; a little cous cous goes a long way. And if you want it really easy, you can find sachets of pre-pared cous cous in supermarkets;Waitrose has some wonderful mixes

In the pre-cooked category (weight not being much of an issue), I like tins - stews, dals, veggie curries and so on. Supermarkets generally have a sufficiently good selection that you won't need to eat the same thing twice unless you're on a very long trip. Tins have the advantage of being safe from sea water and with ring pulls you don't even need a tin-opener. Preparation is fast.

In the no-cooking category, I like German rye-bread . It comes pre-sliced in packets, keeps much longer than pitta, and is denser so you're not packing air bubbles. You can get it in delis and good supermarkets.

And for energy - which you need if you're doing lots of paddling - peanut butter and cheese are high in calories and hard to beat. .

For more ideas, look in any diet book and make a point of choosing the things it tells you to avoid. For a high energy diet you need to avoid - or at least balance - the very foods diet books recommend.

I learnt the same message another way when I paddled in Canada's North West Territories. Fishing was easier on the river Kazan than anywhere else I've been, and catching a two-foot lake trout rarely took more than five minutes. But I was told that Inuit never ate them.

The reason? The fish are so healthy they contain hardly any calories, which is little use to someone trying to survive in the sub-Arctic where it snows in August.
Last edited by Jonathan. on Thu Mar 10, 2005 4:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by CCL » Thu Mar 10, 2005 4:08 pm

some great suggestions there.....

I have found that towards the end of a second week, that some good quality tinned food (marks and spencers?) is a lovely treat...for when you are getting fed up with tuna fish and dehydrated food.

I also often take a wide neck flask with me and if you put rice/herbs/stock/ mushrooms etc in it and top it up with boiling water in the morning, you will have a risotto style 'ready meal' for later....

re the credit card style catering - well, thanks Mike for those Skye suggestions. I am off up to Skye/Sleat area (with boat) on the 21st March for 2 weeks, so may 'test' out those recommendations of yours. No firm plans - will see what the weather is like!

Claire

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Zoe Newsam
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Post by Zoe Newsam » Fri Mar 11, 2005 8:44 am

I'm amazed no-one has mentioned The Old Forge, Inverie, Knoydart for 'credit card kayaking'. Surely the best option all round! Beautiful fresh locally caught / grown food, great beer, and awesome craic. And if you're really lucky, top quality traditional music sessions too (join in if you're brave / talented enough!) What more could you want! Oh and you camp for free on the Long Beach, but try & get there at high water- it's called the Long Beach for a reason!

Also:

The Puffer, Easdale Island
Duntulm Castle Hotel, Skye
Am Politician, Eriskay
Castlebay Hotel, Barra

etc etc... The list goes on!

Zoe

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Post by Bertie.. » Fri Mar 11, 2005 8:57 am

let's not forget the South Coast here.. you can do the whole length of the World Heritage 'Jurassic Coast' hopping from pub to pub if you put some thought into it.. Fantastic scenery, challenging paddling, unique insights into natural history, and a town called 'Beer' - what more would you want!

It's not just Scotland that has good paddling, great food, fine local ales, and a WWW!

Bertie..
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Zoe Newsam
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Post by Zoe Newsam » Fri Mar 11, 2005 9:03 am

Bertie wrote:
Fantastic scenery, challenging paddling, unique insights into natural history, and a town called 'Beer'
And FAR too many people!!!!! ;0)

Zoe

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pubs

Post by tpage » Fri Mar 11, 2005 9:03 am

CCK- The Jura Hotel- can be intertaining and you can camp for free in front of the pub (donation to the RNLI box in the bar)- they also have showers you can use for £1. Mmm south coast of England sure has a fine WWW- but it is a bit busy (traffic and people-wise) for me.

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Post by tpage » Fri Mar 11, 2005 9:04 am

zoenewsam wrote:Bertie wrote:
Fantastic scenery, challenging paddling, unique insights into natural history, and a town called 'Beer'
And FAR too many people!!!!! ;0)

Zoe
SNAP!

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Post by Mark R » Fri Mar 11, 2005 9:06 am

zoenewsam wrote:And FAR too many people!!!!! ;0)
Well...we're not talking Hebridean wilderness, but turn right out of Swanage and see how many folk you run into for the next twenty miles...only one road access in that distance.
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Post by Bertie.. » Fri Mar 11, 2005 9:08 am

couldn't agree more, Mark. If you know where to go, you can easily escape crowds, even a trip around Portland will get you away from most people!

Bertie..

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Zoe Newsam
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Post by Zoe Newsam » Fri Mar 11, 2005 9:47 am

And good wild camping spots? Any tips from you two?

Zoe

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Post by Mark R » Fri Mar 11, 2005 9:51 am

Secret campspots? That would be telling...

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Post by tpage » Fri Mar 11, 2005 10:15 am

guidebook wrote:... but turn right out of Swanage and see how many folk you run into for the next twenty miles...only one road access in that distance.
Is the lack of roads got anything to do with the gunnery range? ;-)
I have spent a couple of camping trips down in that area of Dorset, back when I used to live in London- but I didnt kayak then. Really stunning bit of coastline- nice pubs- but lots of old ulgy nude people on the beach at Studland- is that name a joke or what? I certainly envy you the climate and easy access to the continent though. Tony

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greyheads pie-kebab

Post by woodsy » Mon Mar 14, 2005 11:20 am

you can't beat greyheads pie-kebabs as eaten regularly by rob minchin aka (uuufb)

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