Cooking...

Inland paddling
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Mark R
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Cooking...

Post by Mark R » Mon Jan 17, 2005 7:32 pm

...is not listed on my CV as one of my Superhero powers.

My camp cooking usually involves a credit card and a walk to the pub.

However, worryingly we've decided to treat our Easter trip to Bolivia as an 'Expedition'. I know from past experience that this impressive sounding word simply means 'everything as normal, only with sh*t food'.

Our last overnight trip was educational. Sitting in hissing rain in a Central American rainforest last August, eating a dinner of tinned tuna, processed sliced cheese and soggy remnants of bread rolls.

Needless to say we don't want a repeat of this sorry incident. Any thoughts please, on the following?

- Multi-fuel stoves
- Wayfarer expedition foods (other brands?)
- Other options?

Cheers,
Mark Rainsley
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Phil.Dunn
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Post by Phil.Dunn » Mon Jan 17, 2005 7:40 pm

Bolivian guinea pigs, had a peruvian one killed, skinned roasted in front of me then had to eat it, it was ok actually !
Seriously try the forums here, www.ukclimbing.com/forums loads of similar requests foe stoves such as msr, also try www.needlesports.com a shop website but a rather helpfull one !

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Douglas Wilcox
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Jetboil

Post by Douglas Wilcox » Mon Jan 17, 2005 7:48 pm

Jetboil

You can get one from Explore4 or Cotswolds.

Douglas

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Mark R
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Re: Jetboil

Post by Mark R » Mon Jan 17, 2005 7:56 pm

Douglas Wilcox wrote:Jetboil
That's a rather impressive and appealing looking gizmo Douglas. However, we almost certainly can't get gas stoves over there, and the airlines get stroppy when you try to carry them on as hand luggage.

I actually currently use a Trangia Stove with a gas burner attachment - because it's easy, safe, clean, idiot-proof. In Uganda we used it with the old-fashioned meths burner (meths bought from chemists in Jinja) as the gas bottle option was out. However, Trangia's are probably too big and heavy to go in the back of WW boats.

I HATE flame and I HATE fiddling with technology...so the idea of petrol sloshing around a highly complicated multi-fuel stove utterly terrifies me. Are any of them more user-friendly than others???
Mark Rainsley
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Guest

Post by Guest » Mon Jan 17, 2005 8:00 pm

Have you thought about the Ray Mears option?

sneaky dog

Post by sneaky dog » Mon Jan 17, 2005 8:10 pm

paddle an open canoe..................
half the blade, twice the paddler AND ten times more gear and food!

good luck!

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James Hartley
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Post by James Hartley » Mon Jan 17, 2005 8:16 pm

you can buy some solid fuel mini camping stoves, I think they work with something similliar to a fire lighter, but I don't know for sure, they look like they pack down pretty small, and the forces use them.
The more apparently complex an act, the more vital it is to search until you find its inner simplicity
Feed the rat

Wondergirl(NOT LOGGED)

Post by Wondergirl(NOT LOGGED) » Mon Jan 17, 2005 8:40 pm

MSR stoves are really good, and simple to use. It just takes practice, like with anything. If you do decide to get a petrol stove then you'll probably need a repair kit. Reason for this is that when using dirty fuel, petrol or anything other than super clean camping gas fuel, the jet which squirts fuel can get clogged up.

What about a baby trangia?

Wayfarer foods were ok, but are heavy, what about dehydrated foods?

G

How come you go to far off places all the time!!! Quite jealous, am considering a career in whatever you do... ;)

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marv_mcd
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Post by marv_mcd » Mon Jan 17, 2005 8:47 pm

Definately recpmmend msr stoves as well. I have an XGK (http://www.msrcorp.com/stoves/xgk.asp) that burns 'anything', and comes with separate jets for dirty and clean fuels. It has a 'shaker jet' as well - give it a shake and a pin inside cleans out the jet. Not very good for simmering though, it's a bit all or nothing.

AndyH
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Guinea Pig... Mmm...

Post by AndyH » Mon Jan 17, 2005 8:56 pm

Why bother with the hassle of cooking for yourself? Eat out in the local village and you'll probably save money (compared with buying a new stove). Never been to Bolivia, but have been to Chile and Peru, and the food is (rather different but) good. I understand guinea pig is actually quite tasty.

If you do need a stove, I think the MSRs run off diesel as well as everything else. Diesel shouldn't explode, although it will presumably be a bitch to clean the stove afterwards.

As an aside, watch out for landmines if you go close to the borders. I think they're mostly on the Chilean/Peruvian side, but it would be worth checking with the locals.

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Post by AndyH » Mon Jan 17, 2005 9:14 pm

Not all this well marked...

Image

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Mark R
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Post by Mark R » Mon Jan 17, 2005 9:55 pm

Wondergirl(NOT LOGGED) wrote:How come you go to far off places all the time!!! Quite jealous, am considering a career in whatever you do... ;)
This website could change your boating life...
http://www.tta.gov.uk
Mark Rainsley
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Mark R
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Post by Mark R » Mon Jan 17, 2005 9:57 pm

James Hartley wrote:you can buy some solid fuel mini camping stoves.
Solid fuel (any fuel) + check-in desk at Heathrow = men with flak jackets and big guns jumping out at you.
Mark Rainsley
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Mark R
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Re: Guinea Pig... Mmm...

Post by Mark R » Mon Jan 17, 2005 9:59 pm

AndyH wrote:Why bother with the hassle of cooking for yourself? Eat out in the local village and you'll probably save money (compared with buying a new stove).
We certainly hope to live the highest life Bolivia can offer us, off the river. The stoves are for overnight trips.

Thanks for the landmine pic by the way, that's a new one on us. Help.

Cheers,
Mark Rainsley
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Wondergirl (not logged)

Post by Wondergirl (not logged) » Mon Jan 17, 2005 10:00 pm

Training teachers or being one?!

My mum is a primary school teacher......I think it'll take more than an improved boating lifestyle to cancel out all the stories she's told me over the years!!!

But yes, good holidays, and kids are refreshing.....

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Mark R
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Post by Mark R » Mon Jan 17, 2005 10:12 pm

Wondergirl(NOT LOGGED) wrote:What about a baby trangia?
???????? More info please?????????
Mark Rainsley
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Airmiles
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Stoves various....

Post by Airmiles » Mon Jan 17, 2005 10:15 pm

If you decide to go MSR, go for the Dragonfly - similar to the XGK but with added simmer control.

You can get fuel (and even stoves) in several shops in the gringo zone of La Paz, in Calle Sagarmaga and Calle Linares - although I didn't pay much attention to which types of fittings, unfortunately. But presumably you can buy a matching set there and save the hassle of carrying it on planes.

Bolivia isn't Chile, it's true... but then neither is it Nepal. e.g. getting your photos burnt onto CD is not a problem - I even saw two Scoobies!!

Wondergirl
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Post by Wondergirl » Mon Jan 17, 2005 10:26 pm

guidebook wrote:
Wondergirl(NOT LOGGED) wrote:What about a baby trangia?
???????? More info please?????????

http://www.ultimateoutdoors.co.uk/images/plu/350.jpg

mini trangia, think its uses the same fuel holder as the normal trangias, but has a smaller wind shield and pan, guess you could use slightly bigger pans......

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Adrian Cooper
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Fire Spout

Post by Adrian Cooper » Mon Jan 17, 2005 10:27 pm

A friend of mine makes the 'Fire Spout'. It is low tech in the extreme. A highly collapsible metal contraption which, when assembled, becomes a form of chimney into which you put small sticks to burn. Adjusting the temperature is by using longer or smaller sticks. The draught comes from a hole in the bottom and the smoke comes out f a hole at the top.

We stopped on the river bank on new years day and had fried bacon in ten minutes followed by a brew and roast chestnuts.

http://www.occuk.co.uk/outdoor

Available in stainless steel for the quality look.

Adrian

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Post by Wondergirl » Mon Jan 17, 2005 10:27 pm


Wondergirl
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Post by Wondergirl » Mon Jan 17, 2005 10:33 pm

Even more info....

http://home.smelinkweb.com/Assembler2.a ... bjecttype=

goodness, I'm turning into Deaves with the DR boats!

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neilfarmer
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Re: Jetboil

Post by neilfarmer » Mon Jan 17, 2005 11:53 pm

guidebook wrote:
Douglas Wilcox wrote:Jetboil
I HATE flame and I HATE fiddling with technology...so the idea of petrol sloshing around a highly complicated multi-fuel stove utterly terrifies me. Are any of them more user-friendly than others???
Me too. The thought of lighting an MSR scares me senseless.... However, for going to turkey, going without tea scared me more! I bought an MRS (very small) and petrol bottle. Flew (with NO petrol) and the stove in a dry bag and in the kayak. Got petrol there, dried the bottle and stove out for 1-2 days at the end.

Using the stove was absolutely no hassle. Genuinely, it was really simple. I said "Alex, light that stove will you"! More seriously, they do light fine (I have done it several times). On a 2 day trip, we left the stuff halfway down, it was HOT and sunny. I fully expected to get to a crater where I had left the fuel bottle! I then spent the following day expecting to get the back half of my H3 blown off, but absolutely no problems. It made a BIG difference at the overnight.

If you are worried about the fuel still in the lines after the trip, the group can share the cost of the one stove, not use it before and leave it there?

If/When I am down at the dart, I will try and remember to bring it and demonstrate (hopefully) how easy it is to use.
Neil Farmer.

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Poke
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Landmines

Post by Poke » Tue Jan 18, 2005 12:14 am

Not all this well marked...
I remember being driven along a dirt track <30km from the Angolan border looking out of the back of a landrover, when the below sign suddenly appeared, then faded into the distance as we continued driving...

I scratched my head...

Image

bugs bunny
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Post by bugs bunny » Tue Jan 18, 2005 12:49 am

tinned tuna, processed sliced cheese and soggy remnants of bread rolls.

would seem a less troublesome option with less risk of becoming a galloping gourmet! (just need some local brew to wash it down) :)

Hedgepig
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Rehydrated food

Post by Hedgepig » Tue Jan 18, 2005 9:29 am

Wayfarers are nice but they are heavy. There are some Norweagen Army dehydrated food packs that you can get which are a bit like Raven packs except they taste nice and fill you up. Really easy to cook; just boil the water pour in the bag and wait 5 minutes. Can't remember where you can get them from but it is somewhere on the net I think. They are lighter and tastier then Wayfarers.

As for stoves if you want something to work anywhere on anything go for an XGK. They will burn almost anything and are really easy to fix. Before you fly back if you dismantle the stove and leave it in the sun for a couple of hours then you will clear the fuel.

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Post by jonba » Tue Jan 18, 2005 11:26 am

I use a whisper light (MSR) very simple to use, will run on anything liquid and flammable (pretty much) but best on kerosene petrol whitespirits or similar. It's light and like most of the MSRs has good fuel economy so you wont need to carry as much. As an example 1.5litres was enough for 3 people for 3 weeks in the alps. Don't know how feasable it is but open fires/barbeque style is great because you can use whatever wood you find (not sure about bolivia though, my experience extends to Canadaian wilderness).

Food wise.. it depends on how much weight you can carry. From personal experience put in things like ketchup, mustard, seasonings as it will liven up a bland meal.

Take things like 5 minute savoury rice (less fuel!) and pasta rather than just plain. Although it costs more it tastes nicer if you've not got anything exciting to go with it.

Learn to fish!

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Poke
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Recipes

Post by Poke » Tue Jan 18, 2005 12:43 pm

I find that cooking rice in packet soup mixture works well when size of food is a restriction. Warm stodgy tasty goop.. Excellent..

Andy_L

MSR whisper light

Post by Andy_L » Tue Jan 18, 2005 12:46 pm

jonba wrote:I use a whisper light (MSR) very simple to use
Mark - This is the one I purchased for the Bolivia trip. I tried it out over the weekend and got it to work within 5 minutes (having never used a petrol stove before).

There are dire warnings in the manual of "fire balls" if you don't do this that or the other - quite intimidating.

Andy

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Post by RichardCree » Tue Jan 18, 2005 9:13 pm

go for a primus omnifuel, twice as efficient as the msr dragonfly, and comes with bits so it will burn almost anything petrol, diesel, parafin, meths even gas. less breakable bits to break.

or the fire spout

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seismicscot
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Post by seismicscot » Wed Jan 19, 2005 12:13 pm

Mark,

I'd agree with Richard and go for an multi-fuel stove. Although great stoves, I've found MSRs a bit pissy when they have to deal with dirty fuel.

You may also want to take along this:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASI ... 44-4204626

Cheers,

Clark
Clark Fenton

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