Rockpool Kayaks^

Places, technique, kayaks, safety, the sea...
Craig Addison
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Rockpool Kayaks^

Post by Craig Addison » Thu Oct 14, 2004 5:57 pm

Have you tried the new Rockpool Kayaks yet? What do you think? I had a quick go in one the other week found it fast & pretty stable, I particularly liked the deck arrangement allowing you to paddle with the your knees up and not pushed out ti the side all the time.

http://www.aledw.dircon.co.uk/index.htm

Craig.

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Mark R
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Post by Mark R » Thu Oct 14, 2004 8:12 pm

Looks nice, Craig. Anyone stock them in the south?

But the name...ALAW...what's that all about?
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ChrisS
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Alaw

Post by ChrisS » Thu Oct 14, 2004 8:33 pm

Named after Llyn Alaw or Afon Alaw on Anglesey. The Alaw runs into the sea near Holyhead/Stanley Embankment etc.

Designer Aled Williams.

Craig Addison
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Post by Craig Addison » Thu Oct 14, 2004 8:53 pm

[quote="guidebook"]Looks nice, Craig. Anyone stock them in the south?

Don't think he's set up any dealerships as such, you can get them direct from Aled though, or if you want to try one you can meeet up with him in Holyhead or have a play in one at a symposium, but there probably won't be any until next year now.

Craig.

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Sharky
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Rockpool Kayaks - the ALAW

Post by Sharky » Mon Oct 18, 2004 8:31 am

But the name...ALAW...what's that all about?[/quote]

Two reasons:

Alaw is a popular girls name in North Wales, which means melody

&

Llyn ALAW is at the heart of Anglesey and the river that runs from it flows past Aled's house.

Aled thought it important to acknowledge his heritage and give it a Welsh name

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Sharky
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Post by Sharky » Wed Oct 20, 2004 6:26 pm

Here are my thoughts about the ALAW..........

For many years I have paddled a Romany and loved every minute of it. Its been there for me through thick and thin. Work, rest and play. 5* and beyond.

Those of you that don't know the original Romany was co-designed by Aled Williams and Nigel Dennis. Nigel, as you may be aware owns and runs ASSC and NDK Ltd. What you may not know is that Aled is a full time teacher and in his spare time has embraced all aspects of paddlesports, being a naturally talented paddler and coach (with a small 'c').

After an absecence from the paddling scene for the last couple of years, Aled has returned with even greater enthusiasm, more knowledge to impart and a NEW sea kayak - the ALAW (Welsh for melody).

You can see pictures of it with the link Chris has posted

Despite recovering from a broken shoulder and I mean broken - complete scapula separation, Aled is still able to out perform and out paddle the best in North Wales (in my opinion). He's still good at the tricks too - not every day you see someone doing press ups on the back deck in a swell at South Stack (I have witnesses for those that doubt me).

The reason for this account is we recently met up for a day's paddling to try out his new boat - the ALAW. The flagship craft of a new range of boats that have been in development for the last ten years. The ALAW is made in Holyhead using the superb skills of Mike Webb who worked on the original production line of Romany's.

So what's so special about it? Well, each boat is hand made and incorporates some very forward thinking construction methods.The deck design is the first thing you notice with quite a raise forward of the cockpit. The deck lines are held in place with 'clean' fittings so no screws or bolts. The next thing you notice is the excellent seating position. The seat is low and comfortable. It comes with adjustable hip-pad options. There is a sculpted, full plate footrest on adjustable rails and secure braces for your knees. So rather than having your thighs and legs spladed out like frog. You sit with your legs slightly raised and much more natural.

But the important thing is how does it handle? This is a boat for the 21st century and it handles like a dream. Spring tides today so Penryn Mawr was running big. The ALAW just wants to move in this kind of water and move with grace. It is responsive and dynamic. You feel it keen to respond with each paddle stroke. Though it has midway chines, there's no twitching affect when your sitting still. Rescues and rolls are performed with ease.

In brief, its fun to paddle :0) and I'm saving up to buy one myself.

I make no apologies for writing this 'review' of the ALAW, However these are still my personal views. I just want people to know what choice is out there. Aled is a good friend and it would be nice to see him succeed. All the best to you mate.

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Zoe Newsam
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Rockpool Kayaks

Post by Zoe Newsam » Wed Nov 24, 2004 10:24 am

Check out their website:

www.rockpoolkayaks.com

I saw the Alaw being paddled (by Aled and several other people) at the Uist symposium, & they look like beautiful boats. Didn't get time to have a go myself unfortunately. Aled is also now running coaching courses as part of the business & having spent a couple of hours of one-on-one coaching time with him on Uist, I reckon he's one of the best. An extraordinarily talented paddler with a real insight into how the boat and paddle works, and the ability to explain it so it seems oh-so-clear- no text-book stuff here, just a real, deep level of knowledge & understanding. Oh and a really nice bloke to boot!!
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jayno55
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Post by jayno55 » Fri Nov 26, 2004 10:05 pm

Sharky

I notice you're saving up for an Alaw. How much does one cost? There's no price details on the website.

Also, the Alaw is described as aimed at the medium/large size paddler. Any idea when they are bringing out the smaller version?

Jayno

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jayno55
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Post by jayno55 » Fri Dec 03, 2004 11:36 pm

I wrote to Rockpool to seek an answer to the question no one has responded to on here. Aled sent me a nice reply which included these comments:

"At 5'8" you would be better suited to an ALAW, rather than the ALAW
Bach. The ALAW Bach, soon to be in production, is ideally suited for smaller paddlers, unless you prefer a tighter fitting kayak for surfing and moving water. The ALAW would give you a more natural sitting position. Both kayaks share the same fast straight running hull which is
responsive to edging.

Our kayaks retail for £1595.00, and include a choice of adjustable bulkhead footrest or custom fitted bulkhead footrest, a choice of seat widths with backrest and adjustable hip pads, any standard gelcoat pigment or custom-made colour swatch match, or best of all- metalflake glitter and custom graphics."

Jayno

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Post by Fast Pat » Tue Jun 14, 2005 9:53 am

I was lucky enough to paddle the Alaw on Sunday on a short day trip on Anglesey. Ever since I have been raving about the perfect boat that has finally been created (although I’m sure as soon as I buy one they’ll find some way to improve it further!).

I have paddled a P&H Sirius for some time and as a L4 Coach have paddled probably most boats in the UK market in the search for that boat that feels uniquely right – I finally think I’ve found it.

The performance of the boat is well documented and summed up nicely in Sharky’s review – which I read some time ago. I must confess that when I first saw one at the Uist symposium I was a little dubious of both the raised knees position and the lack of skeg, as a consequence and the really crap weather that prevailed that weekend I didn’t try one, I wish I had – it manages to combine speed, manoeuvrability, stability and COMFORT – the paddlers Holy Grail which has been sought by so many, for so long, the search is now over.

I know that I sound a little evangelical about this but that’s how excited I am! All I can add is that yesterday I put my Carbon Kevlar Sirius up for sale on ebay – that’s how good they are.

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll? ... 85387&rd=1

I feel like the man that had such a close shave he bought the company!

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Douglas Wilcox
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Alaw

Post by Douglas Wilcox » Tue Jun 14, 2005 12:34 pm

Image
I concur with all of the above.

I have had an Alaw out on long term test for Paddles mag. I am definitely not an expert paddler and Paddles want me to test the boats from a "man in the street" perspective, as experts will be able to quickly make their own minds up about a boat anyway. So bear this in mind when reading on.

My GPS shows I have now covered 168km in the Alaw from the Summer Isles in the North to the Skye symposium to the Garvellachs area, to the Clyde and to the Solway further south. It's been loaded with gear for 4 nights camping and used unloaded.paddled in flat water and confused water, no wind up to force 6.

The highlights? It's performance in ebb tide surf and standing waves in the Solway. Fantastic! Its manouverability in tight situations, crossing tidal eddylines.

Any other strengths?

1. All sea kayaks are easy to roll but this one is superb.

2. A sunny 6.5 kmdownwind surf from the Garvellachs to Scarba in a force 4 with a following swell

3. On Sunday morning (12/6/05) the forecast high pressure and light winds were nowhere to be seen. The barometer fell very quickly overnight and we awoke on the west coast of Scarba to a force 6 northeasterly with 17 km back to Arduaine through the Grey Dogs and across the Sound of Luing then across the Sound of Shuna and a final long plug against wind and tide north to Arduaine. The gusts were more than 30mph.The water conditions were slighly confused. The the west flowing flood jetting out of the Grey Dogs was against us along the north of Scarba. It was steepening up the swell which was coming from behind. The wind blown chop was coming from the port quarter and the clapotis was coming at us from every angle to starboard.

Despite being fresh, we only managed 2.4 km/hr against wind and tide. The other 2, in a Skerry and a Quest, were noticeably uncomfortable but I was revelling in the Alaw. Superb rough conditions boat, very comfortable.

4. the finish and construction are the best I have seen on any kayak.

Any problems?

Well I am sure that this will not affect many people but it is not very good at towing or being towed. By the time we got to Luing, my daughter Jennifer was so physically and emotionally tired that we set her off on foot to walk to the ferry to Seil then walk to the pub at the Bridge over the Atlantic. THe wind had dropped to force 5 and I then set off towing her Quest the 10km back to the car (you always need a plan B!). The Quest towed straight with the skeg down but I was exhasted trying to keep the Alaw straight. The manouverability offered by its flattish bottom now was a disadventage.

I swapped boats and the Quest proved a much better tug but the Alaw was still all over the place and I ended up with a very short tow line with the boats bumping. I was very pleased when I got back to the car.

Any other problems? Well on flat water with wind from the stern quarter it weathercocks, up to force 3-4 you can control it by edging but after 7 km or so this gets rather tiring, especially if you have bad joints like me. At the top end of 4 it sometimes responds to edging the wrong way and above that on flat water I needed to resort to sweep strokes.

The Alaw on test has the seat further forward than the current boats. This makes it very difficult for me to get in and out of the cockpit (I have arthritis in my hips and knees.)


Overall verdict after 168 km? It's an outstanding fun and rough water boat. It is also a capacious tourer (no skeg to spoil the stern compartment) but it's long distance touring performance is spoiled only (for people of my ability) by weather cocking in force 4 winds on flat water.

Would I put my money where my mouth is?

Yes I have already bought one! It will not replace my Quest but will compliment it.

Douglas
:o)

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CCL
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Rockpool Alaw

Post by CCL » Tue Jun 14, 2005 1:41 pm

I am in the process of buying one too!

As a relative newcomer to sea kayaking but with a bit of background of playboating and river running, I feel that I have found a boat that I can sea kayak in AND play in.

Interestingly enough, the alaw is going to make my paddling a lot more comfortable. I have found that sitting in a low deck kayak for extended periods of time causes my very operated-on knee (with 3 replacement ligaments) to protest for several days afterwards.

With respect to build quality and fittings, these are exceptional in my opinion. If you get the chance, take a really good look at the backrest/seat and bulkhead footrest as well. They are, in my opinion, the best designed fittings I have seen so far - no unnecessary holes in the boat and I wish the backrest in my playboat was as good!

One of my other criteria in a boat is that I have to be able to pick it up and put it on the roofrack all by myself! Can't do it with a P&H quest, my calyspo is nice and light and the alaw that I tried is also 'pick-up-able'. It may sound silly to some of you....

Oh, and then there's the glitter!

I spent a weekend with Aled a few months ago picking up some of his top tips and handy hints and my boat handling skills and confidence have certainly improved as a result.....but this is much more fun in the alaw than in my calypso. I'm still some way off being able to paddle my boat standing on the rear hatch cover though...!

From a rivers/playing perspective, we no longer expect to have one single boat that will do everything well and this is the case with sea kayaks as well. It's just that storage and finance usually limit most of us to one boat only.

There is probably nothing you cannot do in the alaw that you can do in another sea boat but there are some things that you will enjoy enormously - rockhopping, surfing and rough water especially.

Claire


BTW Douglas, does this mean that you and Jennifer are 'fighting' over the alaw?! ; )

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Douglas Wilcox
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Alaw sharing

Post by Douglas Wilcox » Tue Jun 14, 2005 2:21 pm

Hello Claire,

Delighted to hear you are buying an Alaw!

Claire>
BTW Douglas, does this mean that you and Jennifer are 'fighting' over the alaw?! ; )
So far she has had her fair share but I do seem to have the knack of arranging my share when it's rough!

Douglas :o)

nm

Post by nm » Thu Jun 16, 2005 9:28 pm

I also paddled an Alaw and was also impressed, it brought some long overdue designs criteria into the sea kayak world. I also was impressed with the construction, along with the attitude of 'Rockpool' themselves.

However, for me, the bottom line is no skeg no sale unfortunately - a real shame.

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Zoe Newsam
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Post by Zoe Newsam » Thu Jun 16, 2005 10:24 pm

CCL wrote
but with a bit of background of playboating and river running
And the rest...;0)

Having raved about Aled's boats to all & sundry since I first saw them & met him last year, I finally got to paddle one myself last weekend! I'd always assumed I wouldn't fit in the Alaw (feminine hips and all that...;0) ) but I was proven wrong- it was a lovely fit.

The boat handles beautifully- as well as I thought it would- and on edge is just fantastic.

Personally I'm going to be very interested in the next model- the expedition boat.

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Post by active4seasons » Thu Jun 16, 2005 11:53 pm

Claire, not so sure about the full plate foot rest. As a play boat yes but after four hours in a boat I personally need to stretch out my legs. Pegs allow me to do that.
I love the hull shape though and only wish there was bigger water around at the Skye symposium.
How was your paddle latter in the week? give me a ring if you are up this way,
Ollie
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Post by Fast Pat » Fri Jun 17, 2005 8:06 am

Ollie

They have now altered the bottom of the footrest so that you can stretch your legs - having said that I found that the bodies position was so comfortable that i didnt feel the need to stretch my legs. Indeed after a three hour paddle i could actually get straight out of the boat and walk upright up the beach like homo sapiens, not wait for my feet to start to "work" like normally.

Pat

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Rockpool Kayaks

Post by Barnacle Bill » Tue Aug 05, 2008 4:46 pm

My partner and I have been paddling for 18 months in Dagger Charlestons and have done stuff in them way beyond spec, and found them to be excellent. However, the need to move on into proper pointy sea kayaks has occupied us for many months and we have paddled everything we can in order to make the right choice for us. Living in the South West meant a long trip to Holyhead to demo the Rockpools which have always been on the list. Last week I called Mike Webb to arrange the trip to Wales before we ordered the NDK boats that were at the top of our list. I was delighted to hear that Jeff and Simon at http://www.seakayakingcornwall.com/ have just become dealers for Rockpool. We have just spent 2 days down at Falmouth paddling their Alaw and Alaw Bach.

Here is a summary of our findings:

1. The build quality is excellent
2. The boats handled beautifully in the wide range of conditions we encountered. The boats have excellent primary and secondary stability. Right from the beginning there was not any 'twitchiness'. The boats inspired (probably misplaced) confidence. The boats turned easily, held an edge stongly, following seas were great fun (where in other boats they have been terrifying) and because of the higher foredeck they were drier than most.
3. The boats are available with a skeg if desired. If you don't want a skeg reduce the price by £120!
4. The cost, including skeg is £1915
5. We are both about 5'9" and 11 stones. The Alaw was too roomy but the Alaw Bach was great. On the second day the Alaw Bach already felt like an old friend.
6. I rolled it!!!
7. We've both ordered Alaw Bach's. Can't wait. Just as well the delivery time is only 3 weeks.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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rockpool kayaks

Post by mikeyak » Mon Oct 13, 2008 10:16 am

I had the pleasure of testing these at a Kari-Tek demo day in Fairlie a couple of days ago. I'm 5'7", c12st and not very experienced and recently sold my Quest.
The following is an extract from my log.

35. 11/10/2008. Fairlie for Kari-Tek demo, 10.00 to 15.00 on the water. Ann and Jeff(?) incredibly helpful and patient. South westerly to westerly, blowing F4 to F5 with occasional gusts to F6. White horses and choppy. Tested the following;

36. Romany. Perfect fit, instantly stable, turned easily and accelerated quickly. Excellent downwind. Inspired confidence. Poor back support let it down a little for me and discomfort kicked in after about 15 minutes paddling. Perhaps as much to do with the leg position as back support. If this could be sorted it might be a great choice after the Quest.

37. Romany (poly). As above with a little more volume. I found it a bit sluggish after a while. Similar back issues, although paradoxically it had better back support…maybe it is the leg position? Great second boat.

38. Explorer. Great expedition boat apparently, but not for me.

39. Rockpool Alaw. Instantly stable instilling confidence from the outset. Superb seating position and no back discomfort. Leg position, knees closer together with feet resting against angled adjustable footplate. Back rest very secure. Performance quite remarkable. Easy to carve turns, positively dances on waves and wants to surf too. Predictable in following sea. Excellent in a straight line. Very predictable at all points (however see below)

40. P&H Capella (glass). Felt a bit like the Quest, but with lower volume and much better fit for me. Comfortable seat but felt too high and encountered that twitchy sensation I had become familiar with in the Quest. More comfortable after being on the move for about 10/15 minutes. Quite fast and with a familiar feel to it. Liked this boat and if something could be done to alter the perceived center of gravity (if indeed that is the problem) then this boat could be a contender.

41. Alaw Bach. Wow, what a boat! All of the above with the Alaw but with great fit for me. The balance felt perfect. It was instantly stable with no twitchiness at standstill. I could have bounced on the waves all day. I felt completely in control. I suddenly felt that I could kayak again and my confidence grew exponentially the longer I sat in it. However, I could not make sense of its behaviour with wind on the beam (I had been used to weather cocking, head to wind with the Quest and deployment of the skeg restored the balance). The Alaw Bach seemed to want to do the opposite. My demo boat was fitted with a skeg but I did not use it. Playing with edging to see how far I could go, got caught with a wave, poor brace, and went over. Decided that this time did not want to exit and would try to roll up never having rolled before. Paddle a hindrance at the end of my right arm pointing downwards. So lay back on the deck extended my left arm and swung to the left and nearly came up. Tried and succeeded on the second attempt! Gosh never did that before.

42. Alaw Isel. Didn’t think I would fit this low volume version of the above. Neat fit but behaved just like the Alaw Bach. Probably a little on the small side for me, but great fun. Can’t imagine what storage is available to the rear. Beautiful to look at.

43. In summary; liked the Capella, loved the Romany, but adored the Alaw Bach. I will want to look at a few more, but it will be hard work trying to temporarily put the Rockpools out of my mind. Finally, thanks to Kari=Tek for a wonderful demo day, a treat in itself. MR
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soundoftheseagull
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Post by soundoftheseagull » Mon Oct 13, 2008 10:47 am

I’m a thoroughly happy ROCKPOOL customer and I can certainly recommend the quality and after sales service, good luck with your search.
Re the skeg observations,I had a one fitted this year; I have had the boat for nearly three years I only tend to use it on open crossings certainly helps when there is a beam wind about.
Dave

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Re: rockpool kayaks

Post by Pete » Mon Oct 13, 2008 1:31 pm

mikeyak wrote:I had the pleasure of testing these at a Kari-Tek demo day in Fairlie a couple of days ago. I'm 5'7", c12st and not very experienced and recently sold my Quest.
I'm 5'8" and 14 1/2 stone. been paddling a quest for the last couple of years, recently tried the Cetus and the plastic version the Scorpio.

Definitely worth a look IMHO, I'm planning on trying the Rockpool as soon as I get a chance, but if I was planning a switch from the Quest, at the moment I'd seriously consider the Cetus.

Pete

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Post by Ringperm » Thu Oct 16, 2008 10:16 am

I have had my Alaw Bach for 4 months, and I'm very happy with my boat. It's a true pleasure to paddle, and it really helps me to grow as a paddler.
I haven't been paddling for more than 18 months, but for me this is a boat I can paddle for years to come.

Because of my experience with Rockpool, I am considering the Menai for my "expedition" needs. The Bach is a bit too low volume for me for an extended trip. I used it for a 3 day trip, and I barely had packing space for the most essential equipment.

So If anyone has any experience with the Menai, I would be most grateful if you could tell me your impression of this boat.

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Post by soundoftheseagull » Thu Oct 16, 2008 11:48 am

Greetings from North Wales, I have owned the Alaw Bach for nearly three years and have had some overnighters within it.
The most being 6 days in Norway, with some packing skills we managed to survive well, and with some additional treats.
I have taken the Menai out on two occasions and obviously the carriage capability is far greater and the size of the hatches helps considerably.
Great extras with the front day hatch and recesses for spare paddles etc.
It paddles superbly and has loads of stability but likewise good handling and speed.
The other factor is as you are aware the build quality is the ROCKPOOL norm.
As with all you need to take it out although not sure where you reside.
Good luck you can never have enough kayaks!
http://soundoftheseagull.blogspot.com/2 ... -july.html
Dave

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Ringperm
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Post by Ringperm » Thu Oct 16, 2008 12:52 pm

soundoftheseagull wrote:Greetings from North Wales, I have owned the Alaw Bach for nearly three years and have had some overnighters within it.
The most being 6 days in Norway, with some packing skills we managed to survive well, and with some additional treats.
I have taken the Menai out on two occasions and obviously the carriage capability is far greater and the size of the hatches helps considerably.
Great extras with the front day hatch and recesses for spare paddles etc.
It paddles superbly and has loads of stability but likewise good handling and speed.
The other factor is as you are aware the build quality is the ROCKPOOL norm.
As with all you need to take it out although not sure where you reside.
Good luck you can never have enough kayaks!
Thank you for responding

I reside in Norway, and I actually had the pleasure of encountering you on your trip to Norway. We met at Tingholmen on your last day. I was the nosy fellow with all the stupid questions:) And I can't for the life of me understand how you managed to pack your boat for such an extensive trip. By all means, I am not an expert packer. But on my own trip to Lysefjorden, I had to leave a few items behind, which resulted in a few cold hours in the evenings :-)

Since my girlfriend is also paddling a low volume boat (Roman LV) I'm hoping that the Menai would provide us with the necessary space for a week long trip or more.

The Rockpool website states that this is a kayak for the advanced paddler.
Do you know what they define as an advanced paddler?

Kayaks are kind of like desserts. There are always room for more :-)

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Post by Douglas Wilcox » Thu Oct 16, 2008 1:00 pm

Hello Ringperm

I have been lucky enough to paddle the Menai 18 for two weeks, one of them when fully loaded.

Some impressions of this great expedition boat are here.

On an expedition I paddled it beside 2 Quests. When loaded it can be paddled in a sprint faster than a Quest but is not as manouverable as a Quest.

Using it unloaded (as a day boat) is not what it is designed for and neither Tony nor I particularly enjoyed it in that role (especially as we were swapping between it and smaller manouverable boats like the Alaw Bach and Nordkapp LV).

So it would not be ideal to have as a single kayak. It would make a really great partner to an Alaw Bach though, lucky you!


Douglas

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soundoftheseagull
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Post by soundoftheseagull » Thu Oct 16, 2008 2:58 pm

Hi
I remember you great to hear from you again.
The Rockpool website states that this is a kayak for the advanced paddler.
Do you know what they define as an advanced paddler?
I pondered on that one as well but I would state in my humble opinion that although advanced in age not particularly in kayaking that it would be a good boat for you.
Possibly the definition for folks wishing to do more expedition paddling!
Take care and we are working to get back next year.
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Post by danthomas » Thu Oct 16, 2008 6:14 pm

A Menai has a volume fo 382 litres. An Alaw has a volume of 325 litres. (There are lots more such numbers at http://www.kanu.de/nuke/downloads/Marketsurvey-SK1.pdf). For comparison an expedition rucksack might have a volume of 80 litres. A sea kayak - any sea kayak - has plenty of volume for trips of one to two weeks. The main difference between a day boat and an expedition boat is in handling rather volume. A day boat handles best unloaded but an expedition boat needs plenty of weight in it. The extra volume in an expedition boat may make packing a bit easier but it is a convenience rather than a necessity.

My suggestion would be to set aside a day. Collect together all your essentials. Then leisurely pack and repack the boat until you find the way to cram it all in. Once you have managed to get everything in take the boat out on the water and see how it handles. It may well feel quite different to what you are used to.

If however you get to the end of the day and you still can't get everything in, it is time to consider which of your "essentials" are actually essential. 300+ litres really is plenty.

Personally, I have managed kit and tinned food for ten days in my Alaw Bach. It was a bit of a struggle to get my second walking boot in and the boat felt a bit lifeless in the water but it worked.

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Post by geoffm » Thu Oct 16, 2008 11:12 pm

You are misreading the figures. The 325 litres for the Alaw is total volume including the cockpit. The available volume is far less but still larger than a 100 l rucksack. eg the Romany Explorer is 58l front, 39l day and 60l rear total 157 litres.

Geoff

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MikeB
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Post by MikeB » Thu Oct 16, 2008 11:31 pm

Douglas, how did you find the backrest / seat arrangement in the Menai? I ask having briefly tried (and did not like) the Tiderace equivalant - liked the thigh grips, didn't like the seat / backrest at all.

Mike

johnb
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Post by johnb » Fri Oct 17, 2008 8:46 am

Blimey. Some of you lot ought to do a mountain marathon or two and you will realise how to get a weekend's kit in a 20l rucksuck. Perhaps leaving a wine box or two behind.... you wouldn't have to buy two boats then.

If I was considering two boats I would have one for playing rock hopping/surfing/tide races etc and one with a much longer waterline for speed and eating up miles on longer trips. The longer waterline one would have a bit more capacity, but not the primary reason for having it.

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