EGGLESTON BURN

North of the Trent drainage, flowing to the North Sea
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Mark R
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EGGLESTON BURN

Post by Mark R »

Schmalley
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Re: EGGLESTON BURN

Post by Schmalley »

Regarding the sheep fence on the section from the usual get out to where the river meets the tees, had a bit of a nasty entanglement; two chains had either got tied together or had clogged up with so much debris that i got caught in the loop, got pulled back and held underwater for a while; very unpleasant. Advise being very careful, if level had being higher might have been a lot worse.
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geyrfugl
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Re: EGGLESTON BURN

Post by geyrfugl »

There's a river wide tree blockage just as you come in sight of the tall road bridge - plenty of eddies when we paddled today at a fairly low level, but it would come up on you quite fast with few eddies at higher levels. Easy portage left. We got out at the footbridge and ford a short way downstream, but there was muttering about more tree blockages further down...

On the bright side, even at low level, we saw none of the strands of barbed wire or sheep fences.

To add to the major hazards section, there seems to be quite a lot of pinning potential at low levels, especially just as it widens out after East Skears gorge and for the next fifty metres. There's also a large boulder river left under which a lot of the water flows, so rather than being flushed round it, one may run spank into it, and then get sucked under when you try to sidle round. Fortunately, nothing caught and I came out the other side, but with no paddle in my hands :-( It's also worth pointing out that exit from the East Skears gorge is always up very steep and slippery slopes and cliffs often block any walk along the banks, so portages and or rescues can turn into minor epics very easily.

There were at least four or five parties on the river today, numbering over twenty paddlers, at times all rather closer together than you'd hope for a river with few eddies...

Andy
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Re: EGGLESTON BURN

Post by Neptune »

Paddle this on saturday 29th. as Andy says tree dowm about 50 yards from the bridge, eddies diffuclt satrurday due to higher water level.We paddle on down into the Tees, however there was a D.I.Y. bridge across te river about halh a mile past the get out at the road bridge. This is made of concrete drainage p[ipes about 3 feet in diameter with a walk way fastened over the top of them. Is this legal? Do the EA know about it? Did however built it have permission to do so? It could be very dangerous.Peter
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geyrfugl
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Re: EGGLESTON BURN

Post by geyrfugl »

There's some video from our paddle on the 29th December at lowish level showing what happens when people don't spot the slot drop coming up, among an amount of other entertaining carnage (there's a bit from the Allen on the 30th, too)

Karnage Kapers at Boldron Paddlefest

There's a distinctive landmark rock on river left about halfway down the reach that ends in the slot drop. This photo shows the rock, and the red boat is in the last eddy on river left before the drop - it holds only one boat and you can't get out without someone on the bank (at this level). There's an eddy river right slightly further on, no way to get out at all. There's an eddy river right just above the red boat, not too hard to get out, and there's the eddy the photo was taken from, easy get out. But river right is not a useful portage, and not brilliant for inspection...

Image

Andy
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Re: EGGLESTON BURN

Post by dgg2dwp »

We paddled this yesterday and found a new tree strainer which we walked river right. Its about 300m after the bigger drop with undercut sides (not the slot drop- after the main gorge section) where the river is tree lined. Its easy to spot and there were quiet a lot of micro eddies.
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Re: EGGLESTON BURN

Post by Ben Smith »

Level / Access
We ran this a fortnight ago, I would guess it was on the upper end of medium, judging from the range of videos online. See image for photo of the get on.

Image

The level proxy of the flat rock near the tunnel bridge at the top wasn't obvious, I suspect its moved over the years. The rocks there were passable but still a bump down, and the first few 100m until the confluence was relatively scrapey. The confluence, from the other trip coming in from the right, had a fence across it (so it is best to get on by the tunnel bridge as there are car parking spaces) and just below the confluence there is a small wooden beam across the flow, so be ready to grab an eddie. We had had rain all day but when we got on the Tees was at 0.35 at the Middleton Gauge (empty), though while we were on it went up to about 2m (huge). The beck also went up, though this wouldn't have been obvious at the tunnel (without comparing photos) where the flow is considerably less than further down.

Features
Eddies were tight and we had a lot of looking around corners and checking for trees (as it was our first time), so it took us a few hours. From watching videos, it seemed like the river eased after the gorge, but we found (in the diminishing light) that there were still plenty of features and plenty of trees on or near the water. These trees were getting hard to spot as the light was fading and, as there is a path along the bottom part, we ended up walking the last 1km. We walked around two trees that were blocking most/all of the channel.

The 'surprise slot' was a surprise as we confused it up with a similar feature higher up, but it was a simple feature as there was plenty of flow over the ledge on the left (the following waves/holes were a decent size but flushy). The only sticky feature we found was a steep (1m?) drop downstream of the gorge that pulled us back a little on the landing.

Really great river and one of the most technically challenging to lead that I've done for a while. The gorge at that level was a solid grade 4 with several km of interesting and challenging features, small eddies, and a tree.

There are some other useful videos online, as well as Andy's great carnage reel below:
- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3aGKfADsx1k
- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Nt0Bq6cTuk&t=434s
- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NJSMvlLj-no
- https://www.instagram.com/reel/C7hfq-UsASl/ (our trip, for a gauge of level)
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