Safety widgets

Places, technique, kayaks, safety, the sea...
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Mark R
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Safety widgets

Post by Mark R » Fri Jun 11, 2004 6:34 pm

I realised last week - out with Heather in the midst of lively conditions off an obscure part of the Scottish coast - that I wasn't very well equipped safety-wise. All I had to hand was splits on the back deck, a towline stuffed in a pocket, and a set of mini-flares on the deck....which I hadn't even read the instructions for.

I have the funniest feeling that my pathetic toy flares would have gone totally unnoticed if I'd ever managed to use them. Clearly I'm too used to boating on the South Coast, where you are never more than 400 yards from a lifeboat station.

I really ought to do better. What do people carry safety-wise, either to hand whilst paddling or on their person? Where/ how do they stow it?


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Jim
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Re: Safety widgets

Post by Jim » Fri Jun 11, 2004 7:12 pm

Flares. Miniflares are a pain to use in any conditions, probably impossible from the water. I currently carry 2 handflares and 2 handsmokes, both of which require there to be a vessel or aircraft in sight before you bother to use (even Scotland is rarely that remote). I keep thinking I should but a parachute as well, once again launching a projectile from the water might not be exactly easy! My flares are attached to the seat by a bungee and slip in between my legs - if I ever bail they should float out with me and all I have to do is unscrew the cap from the tube and transfer to my BA in case I lose my boat.

Paddle float. Lives under my map case, never used it but it's there if I need it for self rescue or as an outrigger in some kind of rafted rescue or huddle situation (like getting extra clothing on perhaps).

Easy bailer pump. back up in case the built in pump fails, lives between the split paddles

Split paddles on rear deck.

Towline on rear deck to deck mounted cleat. The debris on my rear deck will interfere with it much of the time but depending on the speed with which it is required that could be transfered to the towees boat? For 2 of you I guess a short tow so heather could hold your boat (or you hers) for stability would be most appropriate in many circumstances - I think we did towlines here 2 or 3 times ;)

Whistle in my BA.

Epoxy putty for repairing holes in the boat.

My phone is generally beyond easy reach and safe :)

I carry something most sea kayakers don't - a helmet. I wear in place of the more popular floppy hats on cold days, and there have been a couple of landings or launches where I have felt much less vulnerable wearing it. Did you have any moments like that, where your only options are scrambling onto rocks between waves that would try and turn you over and drag you upside down over them???? Or landing and launching in surf are the other obvious times for it, and sometimes you may not have any choice.

I guess the top tip would be to have extra clothing handy - not an option for me in the spring when I am fully drysuited and couldn't really add any layers, but as it warms up and layers come off it's important to keep them handy, especially a cag!

Emergency shelter? On my first trip my mate rolled and became near hypothermic by the time we could land and lucky had an emergency shelter to get into quickly. I don't have one, but it would make a lot more sense than trying to extract and erect the tent and/or sleeping bag in a hypothermia situation where time may be of the essence.

I bet you were hoping I'd admit to having a VHF and EPIRB weren't you? Well no license for the former and I'm not that happy about the idea of carrying the latter as there can be heavy fines for accidently activating it (and you know how things get knocked and abused in the kayak!). A strobe light to attach to your BA would be a sensible addition, they last a lot longer than flares and would help a rescuer all the way in after the flare or smoke has gone out.

JIM

Jonathan
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A keeper.

Post by Jonathan » Fri Jun 11, 2004 7:20 pm

That sounds a very comprehensive list. I'm now going to file it, and use it as the basis of a checklist.


Phil
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Re: safety widgets

Post by Phil » Fri Jun 11, 2004 8:29 pm

Excellent advise from Jim, and I can confirm he wears a helmet! several times I wish I had had the forthought.
We tend to break safety equipment (widgets or gubbins if you prefer) into SELF, BOAT and GROUP.
SELF
1 night / day flare (these are rather nice double ended things)
Epoxy putty carried in a film can (for repair)
Insulating tape, rudimentary first aid and also repair
Knife (rope cutting, serrated edge)
Piece of heavy duty plastic bag and a strong elastic band, for replacing that hatch you just dropped.
Silva compass
cigarette lighter
whistle
That lttle Lendal widget for paddles
sun screen and lippy
Spare bung, I use one of those plastic wine corks also good for pump outlets when they become a pump inlet!
VHF radio in aquasac (this is how you get someone to see your flare)
All carried in B/aid sorry PDF!
DECK BAG
Flares, handsmoke, handflare and 1 rocket also miniflares as backup If paddling in congested shipping areas would also consider a white collision.All carried in a drybag so they all float, Jims flare-tubes are excellent for this.
Mobile phone in a waterproof case
Multitool
headtorch
small towel, old reliable bartowels are good, for drying hands and boats prior to repair with good old gaffer tape
Piece of old icecream container (in case of whale attack! major holing)
Spare batteries for GPS/VHF in drybag
small first aid
Food (high energy, or just plain old moreish) I like choccy, and sucky sweets (allegedly good for sea-sickness)
sea-bands (also allegedly good for sea-sickness)
aid-memoire for lights buoys and such, getting a very bad memory these days!
sunglasses and readers (bad eyes these days, probably from not wearing my sunnys)
Assorted slings etc for rescues
spare watch
lightsticks
waterproof notebook /chinagraph pencil (just run up there for a signal and read this!)
BOAT
Splits
electric pump and spare dingy type, if Im in my old HM I also carry spare diaphram etc for Deck pump.
Gore-tex bivvy
Thermorest to insulate casualties from ground (in cockpit)
Hot drink in flask
More food!
Cold drink (though Im renowned for nicking everyone elses)
comprehensive first aid / repair (Jim could probably make another boat with his)
spare hatch, (I must admit to not having a spare for my big oval)
Towlines, boat and snatch.
I only carry a paddle float when alone
GPS, not strictly safety but I find it reassuring!
GROUP
Safety shelter or KISU, its a good idea to carry more than one if you are in a big group, theres nothing more miserable being on the outside while your mates are dry and warm. These are seriously good bits of kit!
mobile phones on another network than yours.
A 20 metre length of line for replacing the towline you just lost, also comes in handy for washing line.
Throwline (see above)

I also like to take a paramedic, a physiotherapist, a vet (they can treat humans too), a boatbuilder etc...

Ive just realised why my boats so heavy!
Phil

Mike Buckley
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Safety

Post by Mike Buckley » Sat Jun 12, 2004 9:33 am

Yep, good advice there. What a lot of stuff we carry though!

I guess I have most of the above in one form or another - also carry a double orange-plastic survival bag; spare spray deck (the nylon multi-adjustable sort)and some small hand-tools.

Things like multi-tools are great but I've found it helpful to have a small adjustable C-spanner and also a small mole-grip. For the spec wearers amongst us, you can get a tiny screwdriver thingie from opticians which is also worth having when your screws come loose :D

Mike.


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Simon Willis
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Safety

Post by Simon Willis » Sun Jun 13, 2004 1:27 am

My girlfriend and I are still pretty new to this, so it's helpful to read what others are carrying. Since I always paddle with her, we can share our gear. Here's our list:

We have a submersible marine VHF in my PFD (not PDF as I keep calling it - too much tim on the computer with Adobe!).

We each have one of those double-ended day/night flares (a red flare one end, orange smoke the other). This is kept in the back pocket of our PFD's on a cord which we can pull out if we're in the water. I also carry the mobile phone in that back pocket (programmed with the coast guard numbers), & Liz carries a waterproof strobe.

I've tried to use mini-flares in a mountain rescue and they were useless - more helpful for the "bang" than any visual signal. Now we're venturing further from shore, we're thinking about getting a parachute flare too.

We each carry a waist tow line. I carry the split paddle while Liz has the pump. The first aid kit is handy too.

We usually stow our "emergency" bag of repair gear in a hatch. We based what we carry on a handy-hint article on the Sea Paddler website.
www.seapaddler.co.uk/newpage152.htm

I'd be interested to hear what people think of this selection, since we've never had to use it in a real emergency. And I've never heard of epoxy putty. We have plastic Capella RM's. Any use on such boats?

Finally we have a spare spray deck, a pertex shelter (a wild country Bothy Bag - really useful), and some warm fleece clothes (gloves, hat, waterproof socks and rain suit) just in case we take a drink and have to haul up somewhere to dry.

www.simonwillis.co.uk



Phil
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Epoxy putty

Post by Phil » Sun Jun 13, 2004 7:20 pm

Hi Simon,
I assume that both Jim and I are refering to the same "stuff", its a two part epoxy stick,(Aquabond repair putty) I normally just cut off a small bit and carry it in my PFD in a film can. It is used by kneading the inner and outer bits together (its a bit like cannelloni!), its usable for a few minutes and will set underwater. I havnt used it on plastic boats but it should do as a temporary repair to get you home, particularly if you then cover it with the all important gaffer tape. An alternative is Flashband type tape but this will leave a nasty black residue that is very difficult to remove.
Phil

Helen
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Safety

Post by Helen » Sun Jun 13, 2004 7:32 pm

Mike - don't forget about the hair bobble! Essential piece of safety equipment! I mean - if us girls can't see where we are going - then danger, danger, danger! Luckily Mike was to hand! Prepared for all contingencies. Haven't forgotten about TAB Mike! Am sending article off soon - and if it's published will finance next trip at your expense!!!!

Helen - x

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Douglas Wilcox
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Re: Safety

Post by Douglas Wilcox » Sun Jun 13, 2004 8:37 pm

Having paddled through last winter off the Scottish West Coast, I take most of the above! Plus the following might be considered:

I take two parachute flares plus a hand held and a smoke for when the rescuers are in sight. I take both VHF and mobile. I take light sticks in case we get caught out at night and need to keep in sight.

A large orange bivvi bag can be used at sea in a dire emergency. Inflate with wind and tie it off with a rope: it's then a huge orange buoy.

I am a great believer in Polartec Aquashell breathable, waterproof fleece, either on its own or under dry suit, or semi dry top and bottom. I always take buffalo pertex/fleece jacket to keep warm on shore.



For each boat we take a drogue. This can either be used over the front to lie nose to wind if you need a rest or over the stern, it's a great aid to a surf landing but reducing broaching. (I have previously mentioned the deck lines we run from the carry toggles, back to cleats near the cockpit. a small krab on the end of the drogue line clips into these.

Oh I do take a paddle float. On a windy winter paddle when I forgot my pfd, it was comforting to have it as a water wing!

Also just to emphasise keeping a jacket to hand: dont do this.
Image

We set off on a 15km crossing to Jura in a flat calm, heatwave. By the time we got to the otherside it was force 5 wind against tide. No chance of gettig a jacket on. We should have been wearing our aquashell tops.

Lastly stuff for making bacon and egg rolls!

Douglas

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Douglas Wilcox
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Re: Safety

Post by Douglas Wilcox » Sun Jun 13, 2004 8:45 pm

Forgot!

Phil>I also like to take a paramedic, a physiotherapist, a vet (they can treat humans too), a boatbuilder etc...

Actually I am a medic but I have a hopeless first aid kit. But one thing I do have is tintcure of iodine spray. This would be very useful if you were on a longer trip and cut your hand. It's a very effective dry antiseptic. Having had a webspace(beteween fingers) abscess on a previous camping trip (it required surgery), I know you can't kayak with one hand.

Douglas

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Jim
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Re: Epoxy putty

Post by Jim » Sun Jun 13, 2004 9:34 pm

Yeah, the stuff I have is aquabond too, but I've seen stuff called 'Ding' advertised in surf shops too. I have to admit that I just stick both entire "sausages" in my BDH with my gaffer tape, trowel, baby wipes and washing up stuff :) The BDH forms an integral part of my foam footrest.....

Phil's list is very comprehensive and based on 20 or (maybe 30?) years of sea paddling, whilst I don't usually feel the need for all of that stuff, the one item I really must get round to ordering is a spare hatch cover or 2! Dropping one of those suckers really would be game over!

I know I am the boatbuilder in Phils list of essential emergency items, I'm not sure who the paramedic or vet are, but I do know the physio - some use he'd be, he can't even keep himself fully functioning most of the time! ;) And don't forget we have the Admiral in case we need an emergency disagreement over some minor navigational detail.... ;)

JIM

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Mark R
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Re: Epoxy putty

Post by Mark R » Sun Jun 13, 2004 10:07 pm

Thanks for all the advice so far.

There are two strobes on this page...
www.bournemouthcanoes.co....-lines.htm
...anybody know the difference?

VHF - what's the cheapest effective handset you can get? Where do I look for VHF training?

Paddle floats were mentioned, which hadn't occurred to me. Some people have suggested they are useful for stabilising the boat for a rest. How well does that work in practice?

What make of BAs do people use to deck themselves out in all this gear?

Thanks,


-----------Mark Rainsley

Mike Buckley
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Re: Epoxy putty

Post by Mike Buckley » Sun Jun 13, 2004 10:31 pm

Er, maybe I'm missing something - but isnt one a light and the other a strobe??

As to VHF's - well, (as we've debated before) I think the Garmin is pretty good but it isnt the cheapest. But then, is "cheap" best?? For training, look at the RYA site www.rya.org.uk/training/c...Id=1032183 and/or speak to the Coast Guard who may be able to help as well.

BA's - not necessary really to have much pocket space - most of my kit lives in the boat or in a small deck bag. I'm experimenting with the waterproof waist-bag idea outlined on the Seapaddler site which has similar stuff as discussed there although I've found it doesnt work as a "waist/bum bag" very well.

My BA/PFD only has one large front pocket in which lives mini-flare pack, cheap multi-tool, roll of repair tape - knife on shoulder patch and VHF in a velro pocket thing I found in a car-park! Back pocket carries a Platypus so not much space there. Small chest pocket has whistle, keys, spare marsbar.

I work on the principle that I can deal with most things with the kit I can reach while still seated in the boat. Everything else can wait till I'm ashore.

If I was ever to lose the boat (and all its kit) I'm reasonably confident I could manage 24 reasonably comfortable hours with whats in/on the BA and my waist-bag, call/signal for help and be in a fit state to be rescued once help arrived.

As to losing hatches, tie the suckers on Jim.

Mike.

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Mark R
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Re: Epoxy putty

Post by Mark R » Sun Jun 13, 2004 11:02 pm

Mike B - 'I'm experimenting with the waterproof waist-bag idea'

When I travelled around the world I did the same thing with essentials - exactly the same bag even - but I think that you need to be able to dump your safety pack in a corner (or in the puddle at the bottom of your boat, etc) and forget it for weeks at a time - and if you use a roll-top container like that bag, it will get wet, mouldy even. I had to dry my passport every night on the RTW trip!

Maybe the best container is a dedicated safety Pelicase (which is what I currently use on rivers), not ideal for carrying though.


-----------Mark Rainsley

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Simon Willis
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Expoxy, drogue, bobbles etc.

Post by Simon Willis » Mon Jun 14, 2004 1:16 pm

Thanks Phil, Douglas, Jim & Mike for explaining "epoxy putty".

I saw some Araldite putty in a hardware store at the weekend, but I don't think it's the same. Presumably Aquabond is only available in a specialist shop? Douglas -is Duncans Yacht Chandlers the only place in Glasgow to get this?

Also, since I'm fairly new to the board, could you tell me where you previously discussed the drogue & the deck lines you run from the toggles? (I saw the lines in some of your photos and wondered what you had rigged there. I particularly like the idea of using a drogue to help control a surf beach landing.)

I too use the Garmin VHF - it's submersible and people who've used them for a while tell me it can be carried on the PFD without an Aquapac, although that would be "belt and braces". Shop around, because I found a £75 price difference on the internet.

I also found exactly the same strobe priced £25 and £35.

Oh, and I agree about hair bobbles - Liz always forgets one so I WILL have to put one into the handy-bag!
Simon








Mike Buckley
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Re: Expoxy, drogue, bobbles etc.

Post by Mike Buckley » Mon Jun 14, 2004 6:09 pm

:p Well, I'm afraid the hair bobble Helen refers to was found on the beach - - - - -

(So much for what was left of whatever credibilty I may once have had!)

In my defence, I had offered a bit of cord, or some bungee - neither of which had appealed to the asthetic requirements of the lady in need of hair restraint, and both of which had been bluntly rejected - out of hand! :b

I dont think we have ever discussed the use of drogues - - -

That said, I have a drogue which is also on my "testing" list - not had the opportunity to use it properly yet.

Mike (virtually bald, so no personal need for hair bobbles :rollin )


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seismicscot
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Re: Safety

Post by seismicscot » Mon Jun 14, 2004 8:09 pm

Douglas,

I just saw your picture of the crossing to Jura. Concerning the need for dressing for changing weather conditions, one solution is the OverSea jacket by NRS (nrsweb.com). NRS claims that this jacket fits snugly OVER your PFD! Unfortunately I have no experience with this item, so I cannot tell you whether it is a worthwhile investment.

Cheers,

Clark

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Jim
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Re: Expoxy, drogue, bobbles etc.

Post by Jim » Mon Jun 14, 2004 8:36 pm

Can't think of anywhere apart from Duncans that would definitely have epoxy putty (well games workshop do but you get considerably less for the same amount of money). Duncans is almost next door to West St subway and has late night opening to 8 on Thursdays, their website has been under construction for quite some time......

Mike - how do I tie the suckers on? I have the original round VCP type with the metal band to seal them, the only solution I've seen for tying these on removes the band and thus the reliability of the seal (well some of it, never depend on anything 100% :) ). If I tie to the metal band, note that it can be slid easily off the hatch cover when open.....

My personal favourite solution is to never open them at sea, one day something (food probably) will be required out of one though :(

JIM

Mike Buckley
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Re: Expoxy, drogue, bobbles etc.

Post by Mike Buckley » Mon Jun 14, 2004 8:55 pm

Ah! IIRC though, my N/kapp Jubillee didnt use the metal bands, and that was on a traditional size "day" hatch and front hatch, which suggests they aren't necessary anyway - - - - - - maybe.

I seem to recall there was a bit of rubber in the "well" of the cover (the bit the band goes in) which I was able to drill a hole in and attach a length of bungee.

The large oval rear certainly had a bit of rubber.

The Quest is fitted with Kayaksport hatches which come with a wee flange on the outside of the two round hatches and the inside of the large rear hatch, making attachment easy! On the rear one I attach the thin bungee I use to the bulkhead between the rear and "day" compartments.

No chance of losing them! Never open them at sea anyway, even the "day" hatch. In fact, I think thats a misnomer really - while the third compartment makes packing easier, I dont regard it as a compartment from which I'd expect to take things while at sea.

Mike.

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Jim
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Flange

Post by Jim » Mon Jun 14, 2004 9:21 pm

Hmm, no tab in the hatches anywhere as I recall (they aren't here), I did think of drilling the flange but then they won't sit down tight against the deck then. I fitted an oval VCP hatch to a friends boat years ago and I recall that it had a web at one end that would have been ideal - his Anas Acuta has a flat rear deck so it was an easy mod, my Sea King has considerable camber and I can't be arsed to build a mould for a recess. An oval hatch at the back would be so good! My day comp has a much bigger hatch but I can't really get to it at sea either, I just have to slacken the backstrap and push it all past the seat, only items that don't mind getting wet though (pans, pelicase, water bottles).

IIRC Phil only got his Jubilee because he heard that the deck mould with the round front hatches was on it's way out and he figured his HM would bite the dust eventually and he didn't want to be forced into having an imploding oval hatch at the front by waiting until it did before upgrading? So how's the skeg these days Phil? Glassed it over yet and fitted an HM?

All things considered, whilst a new dry boat with dry tanks would be nice, I am just about used to getting the gear in this one, my method works now! I just have to be careful that when I get my forearm in past the elbow punching the sleeping up towards the front, that it doesn't spring back and wedge my arm so that I can't ever get it out of the boat...... been close a few times! :D

JIM

Mike Buckley
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Drilling

Post by Mike Buckley » Mon Jun 14, 2004 9:50 pm

Could you (carefully!!) drill the TOP flange?

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Douglas Wilcox
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Re: bobbles

Post by Douglas Wilcox » Mon Jun 14, 2004 9:58 pm

Not having much hair, this is passed on, second hand, from my daughter. If you forget your bobble, womens knickers have just the right amount of lycra. Of course if you are a male with long hair.....
Douglas :)

DaveM
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Safety kit and drogues

Post by DaveM » Tue Jun 15, 2004 1:23 pm

I collected a lot of safety kit through needs of coaching awards, and also from looking at disaster scenarios. I got like day paddling with expedition kit. Then I looked at what I took, what got used, and what I could do without, also match the safety gear to the trip.

Nowadays I tend to travel much lighter, the overall experience being vastly improved.
On a trip I always carry a throwbag (20m of 6mm line), drougue, first aid kit, emergency food and drink, map and compass (wrist compasses are great just in case the fog rolls in) and a cag.
Other kit is added only if needed.

Consider what you would have remote white water paddling in the winter then look at sea kit. Is it all really necessary? I concluded not.

Dave

Phil
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Drilling

Post by Phil » Tue Jun 15, 2004 2:57 pm

Hi Jim
Skegs a little sticky, but still operable,I also carry a spare wire now (taped to a bulkhead), the original which jammed in the Summer Isles was standard Valley stiff wire and bent in the skegbox, after an illuminating afternoon with Dave I now know how to fix it and use very bendy wire which seems to survive my hamfisted landings.We also have invented a very crafty way of reusing P&H Capella skegs without paying the £28 for a complete unit (also thanks to Valley for that)and can now carry spare wire for them.
My opinion on skegs remains unchanged, I do however find that I dont need it unless conditions are fairly knarly, or Im towing, Nigel has also provided me with an idiot sticker which says BEACH-raise skeg!( these were suposedly for club boats but were such a good idea......) Geoff being Mr toolbox also spent a huge amount of money on some fearsome wire-snippers which go through 6mm stainless like a knife through butter, they are also very small.So like wives and children its the accessorys that cost a fortune!
Sorry hatches, on my HM I just pushed a big sail needle through the top flange close to the edge and threaded, or rather pushed, a piece of 4mm through tied to the decklines. If you try tying anything through the metal band they wont close. When Frank designed them it was a bit belt and braces and Valley now say you dont need the metal band, however I find that the ones on the HM leak a little without them (I think they are ever so slightly bigger on the newer hatches and replacements are not as good a fit on the older hatch rims)
On the Jubillee I just tie 4mm tightly around the rim recess and to a deckline, a single fishermans works well as it tightens all the time, also seems to work well on the oval hatch too (doesnt work on Capella square hatches though, its back to the sail needle!).Still carry a spare though! I split a tired and crazed hatch once sitting on it while I pulled on my wetboots. Neoprene adhesive (like Black Witch) will fix them up for a while if this ever happens to you.
Phil

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Jim
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Re: Drilling

Post by Jim » Tue Jun 15, 2004 6:42 pm

Phil,
As you may remember I didn't know how to work the bands on my hatches until you showed me, so I know it makes a difference to how dry mine are too :) The chances of me remembering to find a big enough needle, something to push it with and a couple of lengths of 4mm cord at the same time as I am next with my hatches is pretty slim :) Then again the chance of me ordering spares when I don't have a trip planned is also slim!

Good to hear that your skeg works reliably now - some of those idiot stickers could be useful, we had a couple of relative beginners (in romany's I think) on the Bute trip and they needed reminding whenever we came in to a beach!

What was this thread about now????

JIM

Phil
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Re: Drilling

Post by Phil » Tue Jun 15, 2004 7:08 pm

Whats wrong with kite string and a swiss army knife?
use the thing for getting stones out of horses hoofs, if you cant get spares buy a beachball, they make great emergency hole fillers and it will make a change from Frizbee!
Phil

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Simon Willis
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...and to confuse the thread further

Post by Simon Willis » Thu Jun 17, 2004 9:45 am

I am now the proud and happy owner of some Aquabond!
simon

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Mark R
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Re: Safety widgets

Post by Mark R » Sun Jun 20, 2004 6:18 pm

A trip to Bournemouth Canoes and some Solent Chandleries yesterday procured...

2 rocket flares
2 hand flares
2 orange smoke flares
1 Strobe light
1 mobile phone case
1 Paddle float
1 Handpump
1 AK-47 assault rifle

Okay, I made the last one up. Many thanks for all the suggestions. The only other thing on the shopping list is VHF...coming shortly.




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Mike Buckley
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Stuff

Post by Mike Buckley » Sun Jun 20, 2004 7:24 pm

The AK could well come into the category of safety equipment based on a story I heard this weekend!

Apparantly someone turned up on a coaching assessment with a cross-bow! It seems he used it to catch the odd sheep (sure beats mackrel!!) and brought it to support his lecturete on "Alternative Food Sources while Kayaking".

I'm assured its a true story :rolleyes

Mike

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Mark R
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Re: Stuff

Post by Mark R » Sun Jun 20, 2004 7:38 pm

I just ordered this VHF...

www.seamarknunn.co.uk/cat...em1564.htm

...so you can now all tell me that it's hopeless etc!

Was undecided about buying VHF in the morning yesterday, changed my mind in the afternoon when I had to make a '999' call from the water which - although my mobile worked fine - wasn't really a satisfactory method of contacting the Coastguard.


-----------Mark Rainsley

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