Cranked shafts for sea paddling

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Hairy Pat
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Cranked shafts for sea paddling

Post by Hairy Pat » Tue Jan 27, 2004 11:53 pm

Does anyone have any experience or advice using cranked shafts for sea paddling. Also any advice about combining them with Galasport Cobra, Rasmusson, or Corsair Blade types.

Thanks
Pat

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Jim
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Re: Cranked shafts for sea paddling

Post by Jim » Wed Jan 28, 2004 1:07 am

Just do it!

I bought a set last year, used them, for a week straight off and found them to be wonderful.

I recommend Lendals modified crank, for sea paddling the G1F construction is suitable (and light). Check their standard between the thumbs distance, it is wider than I was used to (I find it OK now) and you might want to specify something a bit different. The ID of lendal tubes is 27mm, if your galasport paddles have stubs with OD about 27mm you are sorted.

Align the spine of the blade with the rise of the crank to get your hand and blade in line, this should be fairly intuitive.

JIM

PhilK1969
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cranky

Post by PhilK1969 » Wed Jan 28, 2004 1:07 am

I borrowed a friends Lendal cranked paddle and I just couldn't get into it, it just felt wrong! Not for me, but he would never go back to a straight shaft.

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Douglas Wilcox
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cranks

Post by Douglas Wilcox » Wed Jan 28, 2004 11:10 am

I agree with Jim. I am on my second set of lendal cranks. this time with removable padlok carbon fibre nordkap blades, variable centre joint so you can adjust feather angle and width by up to 5cm. I have gone for cranks 5cm closer together than Lendal standard, a pal, Richard Cree has gone for 7.5 cm narrower. Neither of us is particularly narrow about the shoulders!!

I get blisters on my thumbs if I do a lot of river paddling with a straight shaft. I paddled 450km on the sea last year with cranks and never got a blister.

Alison, my wife, also likes them:
www.gla.ac.uk/medicalgene...5fleet.jpg

Douglas :)

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Mark R
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Re: cranks

Post by Mark R » Wed Jan 28, 2004 12:30 pm

I borrowed a friend's pair (when I forgot mine) last year, they were Lendal right-handed cranked splits - even though I had to adjust them to LH and put up with te handgrip being on the wrong side, I really liked them.

I'm no scientist, but my impression was that my lats (ie. back muscles) got used more, relative to my forearms.

I will be buying some before the summer. Scare me...what sort of price are we looking at for a top spec pair?


-----------Mark Rainsley

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MikeB
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Cranks

Post by MikeB » Wed Jan 28, 2004 3:49 pm

I'll echo all the "go for it" comments - my first sea paddle was a Lendal Nordkapp with straight shaft and I still have it, albeit as a spare / splits.

I now use a Lendal Powermaster (essentially the same blade) with crank and can therefore make a side-by-side comparison.

The crank stops blade flutter (well controls it anyway) and that in turn allows me to hold the paddle with a lighter grip which in turn allows more relaxed paddling. My g/friend is a "sometimes" paddler and much prefers to try and nab the cranked shaft rather than use the straight shaft of the smaller blades I got for her to use!

It's also much easier on the wrists I find and better for the blisters! I suspect it may be easier to get rotation thanks to the better wrist angles and that might (????) account for Mark's comment re lats v forearms.

Do make sure you have it made to order / your spec, and consider using less feather than you would normally expect. The comments re crank-spacing are also interesting as I certainly find the cranks were set a little further apart than I personally find ideal, even though the paddle was created for me based on measurements/sizing taken by a retailer.

Mike.

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sub5rider
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Re: Cranks

Post by sub5rider » Wed Jan 28, 2004 4:13 pm

Ditto to all of that. It took me all of 20 mins to get used to them, if that.

The crank spacing is critical, and I had several discussions with Knoydart before they were made up and they were then made on the narrow side of the recommended sizing. I still find them a tad too wide and did contemplate having another 2cms taken out the middle. Blade sizing was a closely related thread here last spring.
Nigel, aka Sub5Rider, Onioneer

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Douglas Wilcox
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lendal cranks

Post by Douglas Wilcox » Wed Jan 28, 2004 4:32 pm

Lendal have some cosmetic seconds Nordkap carbon fibre/composite blades at the moment. I cant see the blemish in mine but apparently our Americans friends are even more critical of carbon finish than they are of dentition.

Richard Cree and I both paid £200 for a set with the brand new padlok variable centre joint, padlok fittings for each blade on a G1F 75% carbon crank shaft.

We also paid extra for the nifty paddle bag that will take 2 four piece paddles.

Last year I used carbon nylon kinetic touring blades which I thought were very nice until I used my wife's nordkap composite blades.

Richard Cree and I both went for slightly shorter overall lengths, blade tip to blade tip on the Nordkaps, I think we got 206 cm (might have been 216cm) but Lendal have our measurements in their
computer.

Lendal tel no: 01292 478558


The concept of control hand is totally redundant with these shafts and waterstarting with your non control hand forward is a piece of cake.

Douglas

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Hairy Pat
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Cranked Shafts

Post by Hairy Pat » Wed Jan 28, 2004 6:17 pm

Thanks for the advice, I'll definitely go for cranks.

Pat

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Jim
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Prices

Post by Jim » Wed Jan 28, 2004 8:28 pm

Are you sitting down?

Well Douglas already mentioned cosmetic seconds, I would have to say you don't get cosmetic seconds with composite blades, if there is a blemish in the weave or an air bubble in the laminate it is a structural defect - whether it is enough to be a problem depends on the exact defect. I wonder if people are so used to being able to get cosmetic seconds of the regular coloured blades (where colour problems can occur) that Alistair is actually providing perfect firsts as seconds to keep those customers? If not well, you want to check the defect and see if it looks significant, but that's getting a bit cheeky!

Anyway, as far as I remember the full list price for my carbon composite kinetic touring blades on a cranked G1F shaft was about £240 last spring. I think 4-piece paddlok costs about another £30 on top of that, so Douglas got a bargain!

You can of course go for cheaper blades and/or shafts. The Carbon Nylon are fairly light for a blade with it's toughness and if you are one of those wierdos that can't handle feather light paddles these might be a better option anyway. The G1F shaft is pretty much the perfect choice for sea paddling, a G2F is a bit heavier and stronger and great for rivers, but there are also heavier economy spec shafts - just note that they are not as strong. I've said it before and I might as well say it again, choose the shaft that is strong and light enough for YOU - if you just go cheapskate expect it to break. G1F is great for the sea.

I think, but I'm not totally sure, that Carbon Nylon blades would knock about £60 off the prices above. I used to have a price list but I have mislaid it (and it was last years).

JIM

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