Greenland paddles

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ems
Posts: 2
Joined: Sat Dec 20, 2003 11:02 pm

Greenland paddles

Post by ems » Sat Dec 20, 2003 11:02 pm

I have recently read about greenland paddles, and I am attracted to them for the claims made in their favour.

For instance (no connection)
www.glenburn.care4free.net/index.htm

They are supposed to be easier to paddle, less tiring, easier to perform a roll - and they look so good!

However, I have no experience using them, and I wonder how easy it would be to make the switch after years of using 'normal' feathered paddles.

Has anyone got had the experience of making the switch, and have they found that the benefits are indeed real.
Also do people interchange freely between both types of paddles or stick to the one kind.

I would be glad to read your views.

Thanks

Ems

Also, Mark - great site and keep it up

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MikeB
Posts: 7958
Joined: Tue Apr 29, 2003 9:44 pm
Location: Scotland

G/land Paddles

Post by MikeB » Sun Dec 21, 2003 11:28 am

Well, there is a chap (name of Nigel) from Cumbria who seems to be able to transition easily from a Greenland to a "normal" feathered paddle and back again easily enough, based on what I saw on an SCA trip in the summer.

(If I can locate an email addy I'll pm him or maybe he'll see this and reply anyway).

He also makes the boat move along very nicely indeed using the G/lands!

Mike.

Richard Best
Posts: 15
Joined: Thu Mar 28, 2002 7:26 am

Re: G/land Paddles

Post by Richard Best » Wed Dec 24, 2003 2:09 am

I switched to using a Greenland paddle just over a year ago after Ryanair "lost" my Lendal. I was short of funds, and decided to make a paddle from a piece of cedar I bought for about £15.

Paddling with it was very interesting... It took quite a few short trips in calm conditions before I started to feel comfortable with it, but soon it felt completely normal. I use it all the time, and now find the "normal" feathered blades very difficult to use.

Rolling with them is a real revelation. They're so bouyant it makes rolling much easier, at least it did for me. I have started learning some of the different greenland rolls, mostly in the pool but also cold water.

I'm in Kent if you want to borrow a paddle one day...


DaveM
Posts: 145
Joined: Tue Nov 11, 2003 11:51 am

Greenland paddles

Post by DaveM » Wed Dec 24, 2003 11:20 am

I assume you've found the qajaqusa website ([url=http://www.qajaqusa.org),]www.qajaqusa.org),[/url] being Greenland dedicated it's the best source of info, and no question is too daft. There are also good links and lots of info for paddle building and technique.

Unfeathered paddles take a little getting used to, get used to swapping your control hand with each stroke - borrow a pair of splits to practice.

Make a GP and go for it, it's the only way.

However, I know it's not considered traditional, but if you want feathered GPs, do it.

BTW, don't make them too short, you can always trim an inch or two off the ends, but you can't put it back on.

Clive Leonard
Posts: 2
Joined: Sun Jan 11, 2004 12:52 am

Greenland Paddles

Post by Clive Leonard » Sun Jan 11, 2004 12:52 am

I made my first Greenland paddle a year ago, being un-feathered, and with such a small blade area, it was a little disconcerting at first. I was amazed at how little effort was required to move a sea kayak at cruising speeds. As a bonus, my kayak rolling became far more reliable! A year later, I find it quite strange trying to use a feathered euro-blade: preferring a G P every time. During the last year, I have made about half a dozen Greenland Paddles: both standard and storm blades. Like all things, the later paddles are more refined. At the Sea Kayak Symposium in Anglesey in May 2003, I was fortunate to paddle with Maligiaq’s favourite paddle: It seemed so thin and light. My preference now is for a rounded rectangular loom, with a shouldered transition from loom to blade.
I recommend that you go out and buy a piece of western red cedar, from your local timber merchant. Ask for an 8ft of 4” by 2” (about £15). Insist that you go out into the timber store and turn over several pieces of cedar with the salesman: looking for minimal end splits, and an even colour. Tell him (or her) what you are going to make, and that’s why you want a piece with minimum sap.
Make yourself a G P, oil it, don’t varnish it, and get out paddling with it.

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MikeB
Posts: 7958
Joined: Tue Apr 29, 2003 9:44 pm
Location: Scotland

GPs

Post by MikeB » Sun Jan 11, 2004 1:28 am

Clive - fascinating - any pics please??

Richard Best
Posts: 15
Joined: Thu Mar 28, 2002 7:26 am

Re: GPs

Post by Richard Best » Mon Jan 12, 2004 1:30 am

My son did a web page for me, http://www.freewebs.com/bestie and the paddle I made can be seen with the kayak. It is "unshouldered", i.e. the loom makes a smooth transition into each blade. I found that easier to cut out and shape, but many prefer the shouldered variety.

But Clive is the master paddle-maker! I have quite a few photos of him making a paddle, and I could post them on the site too.. well, rather I could get my son to do it.

E-mail me off-list and I'll send you the pics.

Richard

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