Fish, lovely fish

Places, technique, kayaks, safety, the sea...
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Jonathan Theobald
Posts: 124
Joined: Sun Jan 26, 2003 3:43 pm

Fish, lovely fish

Post by Jonathan Theobald » Thu Apr 03, 2003 12:31 pm

Can anyone recommend a cheap and cheerful fishing rig that can be trolled behind a kayak?

Sea fishing is new for me so the things I'd like to know are basic like -

What sort of hand-rig (I've heard a paravane works but am not sure what it is and does)?

What type of hook?

What type of bait or lure?

What breaking strain line?

How long a line to use?

Most of my kayaking has been off the west coast - Cornwall, Wales and Scotland - where I've seen paddlers catch mackerel and pollock.

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sub5rider
Posts: 655
Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2003 4:38 pm

Re: Fish, lovely fish

Post by sub5rider » Thu Apr 03, 2003 12:57 pm

My recommendation would be to let others catch them for you, and gut, clean & cook too, preferably.

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Jim
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Joined: Sun Apr 21, 2002 2:14 pm
Location: Dumbarton

Re: Fish, lovely fish

Post by Jim » Thu Apr 03, 2003 1:07 pm

Last year I thought using the bottom half of a small boat rod would work OK, it doesn't! Get a handline (sometimes sold as crablines at the seaside), you can just tuck it under your elastics, or hook the winder onto something and forget about it.

Rig wise you probably only want to bother about mackerel so use mackerel feathers, or for the ultimate cheapskate, pieces of tin foil twisted onto the hook - they'll go for anything shiny. Not sure about hook sizes as I used to coarse fish and very much guess when I'm sea fishing, probably 6/0 or 8/0. The technicalities of the hook shape probably aren't that important to you, for coarse fishing I switched to barbless as we always let the fish go, you could use barbed hooks without guilt if you are going to eat the fish, but barbless are easier to take out. I guess a little weight will help kep the rig down, I don't know how much so would take shot (non toxic although there are no swans at sea) and experiment.

I tried trolling a spinner last year, but I either needed more weight, or I paddle too damn fast for this as it kept returning to the surface. Feathers or tin foil are much cheaper and easier to use. By the way, I haven't caught anything from a kayak yet, but then as I say I used to be a coarse angler I'm a bit out of my depth sea fishing!

JIM

Mike B
Posts: 167
Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2002 10:23 pm

Fishy

Post by Mike B » Thu Apr 03, 2003 3:03 pm

See www.nswseakayaker.asn.au/...ishing.htm for some practical tips. Mind you, he is going after things a bit bigger than mackrel!

Once you've caught your fish (pref a nice salmon) Wavelength on www.wavelengthmagazine.com/index.php has a potentially tasty recipe - see the download. Its also got thoughts on mussles etc.

(Mark - how about a menu section???)

The only fish I have ever seen caught from a kayak in UK was a 6inch "coalfish" (whatever that is). In Canada however, someone caught a 15 pound sockeye salmon which subsequently fed most of about 24 folk.

M.

Jonathan Theobald
Posts: 124
Joined: Sun Jan 26, 2003 3:43 pm

Fisherman's tale

Post by Jonathan Theobald » Thu Apr 03, 2003 4:11 pm

I had a good time with lake trout on the Kazan in the NW Territories; from an open canoe a 24-incher was both a typical and an easy catch.

My best effort was anything but easy. It was 36 inches and though it didn't put up a great fight it did pull long and hard. I remember thinking: it's a fish! - no, it's a rock - no, it's a fish! and so on, until a tug decided me. After that it took over an hour to haul in, only possible after my paddling partner landed me and I walked 50 yards to the nearest shallows where I could pull the fish in. With no net it was too big to hold and yank out of the water. At the last moment the line snapped and I was in the river on my knees, desperate not to lose it. Primitive stuff.

I never knew the weight but I reckon most fishmongers would have been proud to have had the chance to sell it. The disappointing thing was that having gone to the trouble of pre-packing our food, we were short on kitchen supplies. That lake trout ended up boiled in with powdered milk, dried onions and not much else. I lost track of how the same aluminium pot got used. Epicurean cuisine it was not.


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sub5rider
Posts: 655
Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2003 4:38 pm

Re: Fisherman's tale

Post by sub5rider » Thu Apr 03, 2003 4:19 pm

Ohhh - don't you just get salmon outa those big net shaped thingies that float around in Scottish lochs.... That's where I was planning to source most of me Easter protein.
Nigel (ace self-rescuer, coz I get the practice) Crompton

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Jim
Posts: 13497
Joined: Sun Apr 21, 2002 2:14 pm
Location: Dumbarton

Re: Fisherman's tale

Post by Jim » Thu Apr 03, 2003 5:41 pm

" Ohhh - don't you just get salmon outa those big net shaped thingies that float around in Scottish lochs.... That's where I was planning to source most of me Easter protein."

Well for goodness sake do it under cover of darkness and don't get caught, them there nets are patrolled by big stroppy Norwegians - you would think they actually are vikings rather than their descendants!

Of course the wild Salmon taste better!

JIM

Rockhopper1
Posts: 23
Joined: Thu May 01, 2003 1:10 pm

Catching Mackerel

Post by Rockhopper1 » Thu May 01, 2003 3:43 pm

I use a crab line, large weight and mackerel feathers. Best in summer months for mack/pollack and with sandy bottom or hooks get caught. The most fish I caught in one trip was nine six of these came up in one go - six hooks, six fish. A guy I was with caught 29! Just let the weight go deep (touch the bottom then paddle forward for some speed, then glide and do gentle pulls on the line to jiggle the feathers.

Julian Patrick

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