Cooking tips for exped's^

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Surf or Die
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Cooking tips for exped's^

Post by Surf or Die » Tue Feb 12, 2008 3:59 pm

Just come back from a weekend bothy trip and we tried to cook a cake in a bag. I've had this before at a works bushcraft course and couldn't remember exactly how it was done.

We had cake mix, put too much water in the first lot (we'd had abottle of port by then and had the munchies aswell) but put a hole in the ziplok bag. Second try we mixed it and then plopped into the pan but found another hole and it leaked into the water.

Anyone any ideas on how to do this.

Any other good weight saving food stuff or recipes.
Andy

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Twix
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Post by Twix » Tue Feb 12, 2008 4:25 pm

There are special bags, I tried this for the first time this weekend, 4oz flour 1 teaspoon baking powder 4oz sugar 1 egg and a splash of milk, the bags are called Baco cook-in bags, I got them from Tesco. I was quite pleased with the result.

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CCL
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Post by CCL » Tue Feb 12, 2008 4:47 pm

or use an orange!

cut the orange in half - eat the flesh.

put cake mix in the 2 orange halves and put together

then cook in the embers = orange flavoured sponge cake

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Jim
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Post by Jim » Tue Feb 12, 2008 7:56 pm

CCL wrote:or use an orange!

cut the orange in half - eat the flesh.
Did anyone else get this far and think desert was over? ;-)

Got to admit I've never thought of cooking in orange skins before.

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Twix
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Post by Twix » Tue Feb 12, 2008 9:28 pm

Used to get Scouts to cook eggs in 1/2 orange peel. Not the best, but worth a try. Cake sounds better....

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Post by Tom_Laws » Wed Feb 13, 2008 12:06 am


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capsized8
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Post by capsized8 » Wed Feb 13, 2008 1:27 am

Sounds like Tesco have missed market penetration on this one, I think they should start selling cakes, sounds like they would go welll!!

Lifes just too short.

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Twix
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Post by Twix » Wed Feb 13, 2008 11:22 am

Never as nice as the home made ones. The fun is in the traveling not the arriving, same with cooking, with a bonus that it tastes good in the end.

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Post by Strad » Wed Feb 13, 2008 11:24 am

There's nothing like proving to your self that you really can boil water in a paper bag, or cook and survive from stuff that you have foraged....
Old School?? I miss my AQII..
Graham Stradling

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Post by capsized8 » Wed Feb 13, 2008 11:44 am

Twix wrote:Never as nice as the home made ones. The fun is in the traveling not the arriving, same with cooking, with a bonus that it tastes good in the end.
Not according to the original post

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Post by Twix » Wed Feb 13, 2008 11:49 am

Well, after that much port I am sure they weren't that bothered....perhaps mine was better for being made sober.

Do you only eat ready meals then? Life is too short to not too eat well in my opinion, but each to their own.

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Post by capsized8 » Wed Feb 13, 2008 11:58 am

Twix wrote:Well, after that much port I am sure they weren't that bothered....perhaps mine was better for being made sober.

Do you only eat ready meals then? Life is too short to not too eat well in my opinion, but each to their own.
We are not talking meals here, but since you mention it - baked hedgehog in mud from an open fire - kills the fleas as well!!

I eat 100% organic vegetarian (until my wife blinks)

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Post by Jim » Wed Feb 13, 2008 12:20 pm

To be honest when I am sea kayaking/camping cooking is a time consuming chore that is essential for survival but otherwise to be avoided. Boil in the bag, tins to reheat, pasta and stir in sauce are exactly the sort of thing I take away with me, but almost never touch at home. Ready meals fall in between - the cooking method usually rules them out for camping, but I will eat them at home when I'm knackered and can't be arsed to prepare something fresh. Freshly prepared food in camp can be good for morale early on (whilst the food is fresh) but the dent to morale of food prep and washing up in the gathering gloom with temperature plummetting has to be at least covered!

Note that Grand Canyon catering is entirely different, I am talkng about cooking on miniature stoves.
Cooking on/beside open fires doesn't work when it's cold, you are never allowed to have embers, there must always be logs and flames.....

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Post by Surf or Die » Wed Feb 13, 2008 1:43 pm

I suppose after a bottle of port and a hip flask of whisky we weren't seeing too well or very co-ordinated.

Thanks for the bag tips twix, that was our main problem. Were going to just eat the cake mix that had fallen into the hot water like aporridge but i think the sight of it started to turn our stomachs.

I like to eat well myself and have got to grips with baking bread, pastry, pies, flans, pizzas, stews you name it at home. But i'm all for simplicity when camping, sachets of sauce, noodles, oats, ready chopped veg etc etc all decanted into ziplock bags.
Andy

Daddy tell me about girls?

Son, one day you will make a girl very happy for a short period of time. Then she'll leave you and be with new men who are ten times better than you could ever hope to be.

These men are called kayakers.

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Post by Surf or Die » Wed Feb 13, 2008 1:44 pm

I suppose after a bottle of port and a hip flask of whisky we weren't seeing too well or very co-ordinated.

Thanks for the bag tips twix, that was our main problem. Were going to just eat the cake mix that had fallen into the hot water like aporridge but i think the sight of it started to turn our stomachs.

I like to eat well myself and have got to grips with baking bread, pastry, pies, flans, pizzas, stews you name it at home. But i'm all for simplicity when camping, sachets of sauce, noodles, oats, ready chopped veg, salami, sliced cheese, bacon etc etc all decanted into ziplock bags.

I'd rather have the extra room in my rucjsack for a little snifter of whisky or port.
Andy

Daddy tell me about girls?

Son, one day you will make a girl very happy for a short period of time. Then she'll leave you and be with new men who are ten times better than you could ever hope to be.

These men are called kayakers.

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Post by Kate D » Thu Feb 14, 2008 11:26 am

Another plastic bag cookery tip..

What better brekfast can you think of than freshly cooked scrambled eggs? Forget the pan scrubbing and the risk of broken eggs in your hatches. Transport and cook the eggs in heat resistant plastic bags. Lakeland plastics sell 'boiling bags' designed to be used in the freezer and microwave. Before I leave home I put eggs, pepper, salt and a bit of butter in a bag, squeeze the air out and seal it up. For breakfast I boil water for coffee, chuck the unopened plastic bag in the boiling water, take it out and shake it a few times and hey presto, delicious scrambled eggs, hot coffee and no washing up.

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Post by RichardCree » Thu Feb 14, 2008 11:52 am

Kate thats a great idea.

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Post by capsized8 » Thu Feb 14, 2008 12:27 pm

Kate D wrote:Another plastic bag cookery tip..

What better brekfast can you think of than freshly cooked scrambled eggs? Forget the pan scrubbing and the risk of broken eggs in your hatches. Transport and cook the eggs in heat resistant plastic bags. Lakeland plastics sell 'boiling bags' designed to be used in the freezer and microwave. Before I leave home I put eggs, pepper, salt and a bit of butter in a bag, squeeze the air out and seal it up. For breakfast I boil water for coffee, chuck the unopened plastic bag in the boiling water, take it out and shake it a few times and hey presto, delicious scrambled eggs, hot coffee and no washing up.
peace and good padlin.

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Post by tizereyes » Thu Feb 14, 2008 12:56 pm

Kate D wrote:Before I leave home I put eggs, pepper, salt and a bit of butter in a bag, squeeze the air out and seal it up. For breakfast I boil water for coffee, chuck the unopened plastic bag in the boiling water, take it out and shake it a few times and hey presto, delicious scrambled eggs, hot coffee and no washing up.
Took me a few seconds to realise that you remove the shells first. Doh!
Nothing worse the cruchy scrambled egg.

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Post by NeilG » Thu Feb 14, 2008 1:06 pm

Interesting thread this. I was wandering around the supermarket the other day, trailing the wife as I planned food for a paddling trip. Looking at packets and tins, it became obvious that in order to consume enough calories every day, to eat from tins would be problematic, both in weight, number and waste. The answer is definately in carbs. A tin of big soup, tin of curry and tinned fruit only makes 700 Calories. You can't carry 6 to 8 tins for every day of a trip so spuds, pasta and rice must be carried in bulk in order to raise the calorie intake dramatically. But then lots of water is also needed... Catch 22 really.

Any answers? Taste is important, but food as fuel is surely more significant?
Experience: something you get, just after you needed it...

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Post by capsized8 » Thu Feb 14, 2008 1:23 pm

To the moderator ------

What happened to tongue in cheek humour around here ????????????

Answer at your leisure -

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Post by Jim » Thu Feb 14, 2008 1:44 pm

NeilG wrote:Interesting thread this. I was wandering around the supermarket the other day, trailing the wife as I planned food for a paddling trip. Looking at packets and tins, it became obvious that in order to consume enough calories every day, to eat from tins would be problematic, both in weight, number and waste. The answer is definately in carbs. A tin of big soup, tin of curry and tinned fruit only makes 700 Calories. You can't carry 6 to 8 tins for every day of a trip so spuds, pasta and rice must be carried in bulk in order to raise the calorie intake dramatically. But then lots of water is also needed... Catch 22 really.

Any answers? Taste is important, but food as fuel is surely more significant?
Perhaps I should have clarified, for me tins are usually used with quick cook rice or pasta - if it needs more than 5 minutes, it ain't going in my basket! Lunch usually consists of tortillas used as wraps around stuff with a few calories as well.

I normally use fresh water for cooking, but if short one can get away with sea water, particularly for boil in the bag. Also save the water for washing up rather than just pouring away. Keeping your utensils etc. clean when camping to avoid stomach upsets is more important than most people treat it.

Tongue in cheek humour?

For you Capsized8, I can't recommend dehydrated water strongly enough! :-p

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Post by capsized8 » Thu Feb 14, 2008 2:00 pm

Jim wrote:[
For you Capsized8, I can't recommend dehydrated water strongly enough! :-p
Thats a bit dry Jim, can you cook scrambled eggs in it?

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Post by capsized8 » Thu Feb 14, 2008 5:03 pm

Jim wrote:
I normally use fresh water for cooking, but if short one can get away with sea water, particularly for boil in the bag. Also save the water for washing up rather than just pouring away. Keeping your utensils etc. clean when camping to avoid stomach upsets is more important than most people treat it.
Joking aside - do you really mean it(underlined) some boil in the bag foodstuffs are in perforated bags to let the water in, eg: rice, couscous, bulgar wheat etc. Surely you are suggesting hermetically sealed bags containing military type rations, curries, etc.

But there again sea salt is healthier than rock salt

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Post by Twix » Thu Feb 14, 2008 5:59 pm

Cous cous or bulgar wheat or noodles don't take long to cook. Don't forget fat if you want to up your calories, we are so used to everyones obsession with a low fat diet. And of course lots of cake :-) I like the scrambled eggs without washing up idea.

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Post by capsized8 » Thu Feb 14, 2008 6:06 pm

Twix wrote:Cous cous or bulgar wheat or noodles don't take long to cook. Don't forget fat if you want to up your calories, we are so used to everyones obsession with a low fat diet. And of course lots of cake :-) I like the scrambled eggs without washing up idea.
But they do require water.

As for low fat diets, thats a no-brainer at any time, just got to be sensible and active

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Post by Owen » Thu Feb 14, 2008 6:08 pm

capsized8 wrote: But there again sea salt is healthier than rock salt
And where does rock salt come from? A dried up sea bad; salt is salt.

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Post by capsized8 » Thu Feb 14, 2008 7:09 pm

Owen wrote:
capsized8 wrote: But there again sea salt is healthier than rock salt
And where does rock salt come from? A dried up sea bad; salt is salt.
not quite, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sea_salt

but it does indicate that I was the wrong way round, my apologies

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Post by Jim » Thu Feb 14, 2008 8:19 pm

Don't see a problem with cooking in sea water, or water drawn from streams if you will be bringing it to a rolling boil. Most people salt the water for pasta, rice etc. to increase the boil point slightly and it gets strained off the finished food. Obviously you want to collect it from a clear spot so you don't have to strain floating stuff out of it, I would also recommend collecting it from a different area to the lavatory.

You can't rehydrate stuff in sea water, and it really doesn't work in tea, but if I've spent all day awash in the stuff including eating snacks,possibly lunch (I usually have antiseptic wipes handy to clean up at lunchtime), and drinking from a bottle which is kept on deck with the neck frequently doused in sea water, I really can't see it as a hazardous substance.

Almost forgot, all the boil in the bag rice I've used is in porous bags, which means you can't use the water for making tea after (Ok with sealed stuff like wayfarer) unless you like a good starchy cuppa! The same goes for all rice, pasta and potatoes cooked normally, the only thing the water is good for is washing up, but you will probably need a bit of fresh for a rinse to remove the last of the starch.

It is my considered opinion that everyone should give themselves food poisoning regularly to develop resistance to it.

Jim

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Post by maryinoxford » Thu Feb 14, 2008 9:04 pm

Jim wrote: Most people salt the water for pasta, rice etc. to increase the boil point slightly
It's a long time since I did school chemistry, but I thought adding salt or other solubles to water lowered the boiling point. (One reason why I could never see the point in salting cooking water.)

Mary
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