Kayak Knifes and carrying them [Scotland]^

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waltfos
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Kayak Knifes and carrying them [Scotland]^

Post by waltfos » Mon Jan 28, 2008 3:05 pm

As we all know the legislation changed a short while back and now stiffer sentencing if not got a valid excuse.

So watch out all you RAMBO lovers and even discrete law abiding citizens. Kayakers do we know what is legal and not if you wished to carry one? We carry them at times on sea kayaks esp when using tow lines fishing etc and for other safety purposes in river kayaks.

The legislation that would relate to our members would be Section 49, Criminal Law (Consolidation)(Scotland) Act 1995. This Section creates the offence of carrying any article which has a blade or is sharply pointed, in a public place. [One for the SCA/BCU to get clearance see below in bold]

There are exemptions to this which include a folding pocket knife with a cutting edge on its blade that is less than 3" (7.62cm).

There are special defences of use at work, religious reasons and as part of any national costume.

It is possible that a knife with a longer blade could be carried in a public place if it was proved that there was reasonable excuse or lawful authority [SCA,BCU] to carry such an article. [One for the traders]

The reason I post this as we arrive on beaches launch and retrieve portages etc or on river banks ie public places. A Police officer has the right to whhisk you away and lock you up until a Sheriff hears your plea.

This one may be for Cailean to give an answer and for BCU SCA to get lawful clearance

Keep shoogling

Walt

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waltfos
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Carrying of knifes in Scotland for Kayaking

Post by waltfos » Mon Jan 28, 2008 3:50 pm

Here is a reply from Strathclyde Police to the question

"Walt Foster,

In your circumstances anyone who has a knife in their possession, in a public place, would require it to have a cutting edge or blade of less than 3 inches.

Anyone who fails to comply with this requirement is liable to prosecution i.e. could be arrested, and depending of circumstances at the time, could be detained until appearance in court on the next lawful day. It would then be the Sheriff who would decide if the circumstances would have reasonable excuse for carrying such a knife.

Lawful authority would not cover your kayakers. This phrase is included in the Act and relates to individuals such as a Soldier carrying a bayonet e.g. the Guards at Edinburgh Castle.

Strathclyde Police Contact Centre "

So beware y'all have been measured <3" now

Keep shoogling

Walt

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Post by Owen » Mon Jan 28, 2008 4:16 pm

Well then my old knife makes me a dangerous hooligan then. Good job I brought a new rope cutter from the Perth show, which I have on my BA.
Image

The old bobbies could really boost their arrest rate by going round every scuba club in Scotland.

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Adrian Cooper
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Post by Adrian Cooper » Mon Jan 28, 2008 4:20 pm

The nice people at British Blades forum give this information:

http://www.britishblades.com/forums/sho ... php?t=8336

The Law FAQ

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Frequently Asked Questions:

Q: How old do must I be to buy a knife?
A: It is an offence for anyone to sell a knife to any person under 18 years of age in the UK.
Section 6 of The Offensive Weapons Act 1996, which is an ammendment to section 141 of The Criminal Justice Act 1988 (offensive weapons) states that:

141A. - (1) Any person who sells to a person under the age of sixteen years an article to which this section applies shall be guilty of an offence and liable on summary conviction to imprisonment for a term not exceeding six months, or a fine not exceeding level 5 on the standard scale, or both.

(2) Subject to subsection (3) below, this section applies to-

(a) any knife, knife blade or razor blade,
(b) any axe, and
(c) any other article which has a blade or which is sharply pointed and which is made or adapted for use for causing injury to the person.

Section 43 of The violent Crime Reduction Act 2006 has ammended the following...

Quote:
(2) In section 141A(1) (prohibition on sale of knives etc. to persons under sixteen), for “sixteen” substitute “eighteen”.


The Violent Crime Reduction Act 2006 has amended the law to make it an offence to sell a knife to persons under the age of 18.

EXEMPTIONS:
There is an exemption order to the above, The Criminal Justice Act 1988 (Offensive Weapons) (Exemption) Order 1996 which reads as follows:

Quote:
2. Section 141A(1) of the Criminal Justice Act 1988 (sale of knives or certain articles with blade or point to persons under sixteen) shall not apply to —
(a) a folding pocket-knife if the cutting edge of its blade does not exceed 7.62 centimetres (3 inches).
(b) razor blades permanently enclosed in a cartridge or housing where less than 2 millimetres of any blade is exposed beyond the plane which intersects the highest point of the surfaces preceding and following such blades.


This means there is no restriction to the sale of folding (none locking) slipjoint knives with a blade of under 3 inches and the sale of safety razors to persons under 16.

Q: What is a lock knife?
A: A knife with a lock!

Q: My knife locks, is it a lock knife?
A: Yes!

Q: Is a Leatherman Wave a lock knife?
A: Yes!

Q: Is an Opinel a lock knife?
A: Generally, yes! Certainly the most common models are. Almost all models of Opinel knives have their patented VIROBLOC® locking ring, these are lock knives. But there are a few models of Opinel knives which do not have the locking ring or any other locking mechanism, obviously these are not lock knives.

Q: I dont always use the locking ring on my Opinel. If the ring is not engaged, is it still classified as a lock knife?
A: Yes!

Q: Is a Swiss Army Knife (SAK) a lock knife?
A: Some of the larger models are, most are not. If it has a lock, it's a lock knife, if it doesn't, it isn't!

Q: What is the legal definition of a lock knife?
A: A Crown Court case (Harris v DPP), saw an entheusiastic lawyer convincing a judge that a lock knife was eqivalent to a fixed blade knife when the lock was engaged. Even though it has not been defined in a parliamentary act, it has never been overturned or superceeded and so is effective law (case law). A lock knife for all legal purposes, is the same as a fixed blade knife. A folding pocket knife must be readily foldable at all times. If it has a mechanism that prevents folding, it's a lock knife (or for legal purposes, a fixed blade)!

In theory, case law can be overturned by a more senior judge or court. The Harris ruling has been tested in a more senior court, namely the Court of Appeal - the highest court in the UK before parliament. The case of REGINA - v - DESMOND GARCIA DEEGAN, Court of Appeal 1998, upheld the Harris ruling stating that "folding was held to mean non-locking". No leave to appeal was granted. This is significant, since the Harris ruling was upheld in the Court of Appeal by Deegan, ALL COURTS MUST now adhere to the ruling.

Q: Are lock knives illegal to own?
A: No! You can quite legally buy, make, sell, import or gift a lock knife. It is perfectly legal to own and use a lock kinfe on your own property, or on private property where you have the landowners permission. It is, however, ILLEGAL to carry a lock knife in a public place, unless you have a good reason to do so.

Q: Are fixed blade knives illegal to own?
A: No!

Q: Are kitchen knives illegal to own?
A: No!

Q: Can I carry a lock knife (or a fixed blade knife) in a public place just because I feel like it?
A: No, it is ILLEGAL to carry a lock knife in a public place without a good reason.

Q: Can I carry a lock knife in a public place if I have a good reason?
A: Yes.

Q: Can I carry a fixed blade (sheath) knife in a public place if I have a good reason?
A: Yes.

Q: What constitutes a "good reason"?
A: According to section 139, subsections 4&5 of The Criminal justice Act 1988....
(4) It shall be a defence for a person charged with an offence under this section to prove that he had good reason or lawful authority for having the article with him in a public place.
(5) Without prejudice to the generality of subsection (4) above, it shall be a defence for a person charged with an offence under this section to prove that he had the article with him—
for use at work;
for religious reasons; or
as part of any national costume.
Q: Are there any other good reasons?
A: Yes. What constitutes a good reason is a matter for common sense, the police and the courts. There is no exhaustable list defined in law. If you think you have a good reason and a police officer disagrees, it'll be up to the courts to decide your fate.


Q: I have an allotment and it's time to cut my cabbages. Can I legally take a fixed blade knife to my allotment to cut my cabbages?
A: That would seem reasonable to me, but there is no written rule. The final word is a matter of magistrate opinion.

Q: I am an odd job man and occasionally have to strip 13amp wires for plugs. Can I carry my 10inch custom Bowie for this eventuality?
A: That would NOT seem reasonable to me, but there is no written rule. The final word is a matter of magistrate opinion.

Q: I am a devout Sikh and am required by my religion to carry a traditional knife or kirpan, can I carry one in a public place?
A: Yes.

Q: I am Scottish by birth, can I carry a dagger or Skein Dubh in my sock as part of my Highland dress?
A: Yes.

Q: I proclaimed myself a Jedi Knight for the last census, can I carry a light sabre?
A: Sadly, no. Although many tens of thousands cited Jedi as thier religion, it is not officially recognised in law.

Q: Is "self defence" a good reason?
A: Absolutely not! If you are carrying a knife for self defence, by definition you are carrying the knife as a weapon. Not only are you guilty of carrying a bladed article, contrary to s139 of The Criminal justice Act 1988, but you are also guilty of the more serious offence of carrying an offensive weapon.

Q: What is the penalty for carrying a lock knife in public, without a good reason?
A: According to section 139, subsections 6 (a) & (b) of The Criminal justice Act 1988:
(6) A person guilty of an offence under subsection (1) above shall be liable
on summary conviction, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding six months, or a fine not exceeding the statutory maximum or both;
on conviction on indictment, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years, or a fine, or both.
Section 42 of The Violent Crime Reduction Act 2006 has the following ammendment to the above...

Quote:
Increase of maximum sentences for offences of having knives etc. (1) In each of the following provisions of The Criminal justice Act 1988 (c. 33), for “two” substitute “four”—
(a) section 139(6)(b) (maximum penalty for offence of having knife etc. in public place);
(b) section 139A(5)(a)(ii) (maximum penalty for offence of having knife etc. or offensive weapon on school premises).


Q: What constitutes a public place?
A: Section 139, subsection 7 of The Criminal justice Act 1988, defines it as:
(7) In this section “public place” includes any place to which at the material time the public have or are permitted access, whether on payment or otherwise.
Q: Can I keep a locking knife in the glove compartment of my car, just because I feel like it?
A: No! Your car is defined by law as a public place. There is no legal difference (for the purpose discussed here) between your car and the pavement outside your local cinema. A car is not a piece of land and is therefore not private property uinless it's parked on private property. Think of it as luggage. Think of a parked car as left luggage.

Q: Are there any knives I can carry in public in the UK, just because I feel like it?
A: Yes.

Q: What kind of knife can I carry in a public place without a good reason?
A: The knife must have a cutting edge of no more than 3 inches and must not have a lock of any kind.
For a knife to be a folding pocket-knife within the meaning of this section, it must be readily and immediately foldable at all times, simply by the folding process. A lock-knife, which required a further process, namely activating a trigger mechanism to fold the blade back into the handle, was held not to be a folding pocket-knife (Harris v DPP [1993] 1 All ER 562); followed in R v Deegan [1998] Crim LR 562,[1998] 2 Cr App Rep 121. The section applies to articles which have a blade or are sharply pointed, falling into the same broad category as a knife or sharply pointed instrument;
Q: Can you give me some examples of a legal folding knife to carry without the need for a reasonable reason?
A: The Spyderco Pride, the Spyderco UK Penknife, any old timer type slipjoint with less than 3" blades, many Swiss Army Knife models and Laguiole slip joints, to name a few.

Q: I keep hearing about "slip joints" what are they?
A: A slip joint is a folding knife where the blade is does not lock in the open position, but rather a spring keeps the blade open for some safety. It can be closed without the need to operate any device or lock mechanism. Think of the Swiss Army Knife basic design, the blade opens by pulling it open and it closes simply by folding it. A slip joint with less than a 3" blade is legal carry in the UK.

Q: I heard that "combat knives" are illegal to own, is this true?
A: No. The Knives Act 1997, made it illegal to market or sell a knife as a combat knife, but it is not illegal to own or buy one.

Q: Are flick knives illegal to buy?
A: Yes. Flick knives, automatics or switchblades are on the "banned items list".

Q: Is there any way at all I can legally acquire a flick knife?
A: No. They are completely illegal to buy, sell, make, construct, pawn, gift, auction, import or otherwise acquire in any way. They were first banned by the Restriction of Offensive Weapons Act 1959 and subsequent acts. With regard to automatic or "flick" knives, the 1959 act makes it illegal to "manufacture, sells or hires or offers for sale or hire, or exposes or has in his possession for the purpose of sale or hire, or lends or gives to any other person. In addition it also states that "The importation of any such knife as is described in the foregoing subsection is hereby prohibited".

Q: So flick knives are illegal to own then?
A: No. You can legally own a flick knife in your own home, providing it was in your posession before the 1959 Restriction of Offensive Weapons Act, came into effect.

Q: Are swords illegal to own?
A: No, swords are perfectly legal to own in your own home.

Q: Are swords illegal to carry in public?
A: Yes, unless it's part of a national costume, or for religious purposes or for a re-enactment event or some other reasonable purpose.

Q: So what items are on this "banned items" list?.
A: Section 141 of The Criminal justice Act 1988 and The Criminal justice Act 1988 (Offensive Weapons) Order 1988 makes it an offence to manufacture, sell or hire or offer for sale or hire, or expose or have in possession for the purpose of sale or hire or lend or give to any person any of the following weapons [7]:
Balisong or butterfly knife
Knuckleduster
Telescopic truncheon
Push dagger
Shuriken, shaken, or death star
Handclaw
Footclaw
Manrikgusari or kusari (rope, cord, wire or chain fastened at each end to a hard weight or hand grip)
Swordstick
Hollow kubotan (cylindrical container containing a number of sharp spikes)
Blowpipe or blowgun
Kusari gama (rope, cord, wire or chain fastened at one end to a sickle)
Kyoketsu shoge (rope, cord, wire or chain fastened at one end to a hooked knife)
Belt buckle knife
Disguised knife (added to the list by the 2002 amendment)
Stealth knife (added to the list by the 2004 amendment)
Note: This Order specifies descriptions of weapons to which section 141 of The Criminal justice Act 1988 applies. Antique weapons, which are defined as weapons over 100 years old at the time of an alleged offence, are excluded.

Q: Is it true that if a knife is too sharp, that can make it illegal?
A: No.

Q: Can my Swiss Army Knife ever be considered an offensive weapon?
A: Yes, absolutely it can. Anything can be an offensive weapon if you either use it as one, or intend to use it as one.
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Post by Jonathan. » Mon Jan 28, 2008 4:22 pm

If it's a question of cutting ropes or lines, you might consider a parachutist's knife.

They're hooked and meant to be safe when you're in a spin and in a hurry. Using one to stab or slash anyone would be next to impossible so there should be nothing to worry the courts.

The jumpshop.co.uk has knifes for £6.50 + carriage.

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Post by Owen » Mon Jan 28, 2008 5:08 pm

Adrian,

That's all English law, north of the border things are different. What Walt is talking about is a new Scottish law.

They made the new law because of the high incidence of knife crime in some parts of the country. With all the gangs of drunken NED's, going around stabbing each other, I don't think the cops will be to bothered with peaseful law abiding kayaker going about their business.

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Post by fiona » Mon Jan 28, 2008 5:10 pm

Are the jumpshot parachutist's knifes less than 3" blades then? The website seems to be down (I'm just getting an error message) so I can't check for myself.

Owen, which supplier did you get your rope cutter from? I didn't get to the Perth show, but would definitely be interested in getting one of these.

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Post by Owen » Mon Jan 28, 2008 5:24 pm

fiona wrote: Owen, which supplier did you get your rope cutter from? I didn't get to the Perth show, but would definitely be interested in getting one of these.
Fiona,
I can't remember, there were so many stands there. Possible it could have been Avoncraft or Brookbank but I'm really not sure. Sorry I can't be more helpfull. If its any help it was £9.

If anyone else can remember it was the stand with lots of books near to Kari-Tek's stand.

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Post by NeilG » Mon Jan 28, 2008 5:25 pm

Interesting thread. A rope cutter would be far more effective than a folding knife especially with cold hands!
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Mark99
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Post by Mark99 » Mon Jan 28, 2008 7:32 pm

Owen said the law won't bother law abiding kayakers in England. A couple of years ago a respectable 70yr old gent was detained by police on his way to a tai ji competition because he had a sword in a bag in his car. The "sword" was to be used in a recognised form competition, had no sharp edges and is so flexible it wobbles. I fear these laws need to be taken seriously, common sense may well not be a defence!

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Post by Reverend » Mon Jan 28, 2008 7:43 pm

I have the same rope cutter style knife. Got mine from Totnes Kayaks. They do mail order.

Regards

Dave

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waltfos
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KAYAKERS AND KNIFES

Post by waltfos » Mon Jan 28, 2008 8:03 pm

Reverend

Any folding knife that has a lock is illegal too.

I do believe in what Owen says most police would us alone but also believe if someone [out to score points] will get you a wee weakend in a police cell as per the police answer to myself and Mark 99 wrote.

The knife that Owen got was from a guy who is at the show every year selling books and maily open boat kit again he his wife and a child manned the stand, cant remember their name, if you e mail SCA the may be able to give a list and get knife form visiting the website a wee bit of logic and homework would prevail a result

Keep shoogling

Walt

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Post by Owen » Mon Jan 28, 2008 8:56 pm

A quick bit of ferreting on t'internet not only have I found them but there cheeper than I paid for mine.

http://www.simplyscuba.com/ProductDetai ... ckID=46249

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Post by Jonathan. » Mon Jan 28, 2008 9:14 pm


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Helen M
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Post by Helen M » Mon Jan 28, 2008 9:32 pm

Is a machette OK then? Cause Dave has one for chopping firewood. And one of these Silky Zubat 330 handsaw Ref: A001

Image

You can never have enough of these things you know - as is obvious on the SCA trip to Loch Etive in December. Chain saws have been known to come out of kayaks on this trip - athough the owner was highly qualified and worked for the forestry commission.

How high do they set bail for these offences nowadays - cause it's only a matter of time ....

H - x
Last edited by Helen M on Mon Jan 28, 2008 9:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by Ken Reynolds » Mon Jan 28, 2008 9:33 pm

Ken Reynolds

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Post by Chris Bolton » Mon Jan 28, 2008 9:45 pm

The Scottish law quoted by Walt looks (so far as the quote goes) to be the same as England and Wales. The advice Walt has from Strathclyde Police doesn't seem to be in line with the wording:
walt wrote:exemptions to this which include a folding pocket knife with a cutting edge on its blade that is less than 3" (7.62cm)
The police advice Walt was given is that any knife would have to have a blade of less than 3" - but that only applies if it's a folding knife. The exemption is for a folding knife with less than 3" blade, ie, both must be true to be exempt. A fixed or locking blade is illegal in a public place however long or short it is (without lawful authority or reasonable excuse).

This is also the case in England - to be legal it must be a folding knife and less then 3".

Chris

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Post by Jim » Mon Jan 28, 2008 10:19 pm

OK now I'm confused!

Basically the law is so the police can stop the Neds chibbing each other.

The police are unlikely to have any reason to stop sea kayakers to see if they are carrying chibs (unless we all email them to ask if we can).

Personally I feel a machete is unnecessary for splitting wood, or cutting it. Axes are good for splitting but wasteful for cutting. A saw is best for cutting, carrying a saw and an axe is the best combination if your purpose is to cut and split firewood. Saws and axes have blades, so presumably both are now illegal in public unless you are a lumberjack at work or on your way to or from work? If you move your saw and axe discreetly from the boot to the boat and only use them on remote beaches, you are unlikely to have any problems with the law.

I just checked, my smallest kitchen knife is 3.5" long. This is the one I take camping, do I need to replace it with something shorter in a folding version, or if I keep it in my mess tin or in the tupperware with the cheese will everything be OK?

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Post by Helen M » Mon Jan 28, 2008 10:29 pm

Jim wrote:OK now I'm confused!

Basically the law is so the police can stop the Neds chibbing each other.

The police are unlikely to have any reason to stop sea kayakers to see if they are carrying chibs (unless we all email them to ask if we can).

Personally I feel a machete is unnecessary for splitting wood, or cutting it. Axes are good for splitting but wasteful for cutting. A saw is best for cutting, carrying a saw and an axe is the best combination if your purpose is to cut and split firewood. Saws and axes have blades, so presumably both are now illegal in public unless you are a lumberjack at work or on your way to or from work? If you move your saw and axe discreetly from the boot to the boat and only use them on remote beaches, you are unlikely to have any problems with the law.

I just checked, my smallest kitchen knife is 3.5" long. This is the one I take camping, do I need to replace it with something shorter in a folding version, or if I keep it in my mess tin or in the tupperware with the cheese will everything be OK?
Jim darling - you always manage to make me see the wood from the trees!

I think we'll just keep on doing what we're doing!

Thanks

H - x

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Post by Douglas Wilcox » Mon Jan 28, 2008 10:32 pm

Tonight on BBC Scottish news they reported that there were 54 fatal stabbings in Scotland in 2007. This rate per population is three times higher than the rest of the UK and compares only with Argentina and Lithuania. Glasgow is the worst part of Scotland. I am not surprised that Walt found that the Police would arrest first and let the courts decide later.

I must check my Leatherman, I am sure the blade clicks into place.

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Post by Jim » Mon Jan 28, 2008 10:50 pm

Quite, but this is nothing new, when I was looking for a University (I started in '93) one of the reasons I chose Newcastle was because I was less than confident about the way the papers were telling us that Glasgow had the highest rate of knife crime in Europe, or the world or something. I also didn't like the dark and dingy look of the place when I came for interviews, I'd still rather be in Newcastle, if only it were in Scotland.....

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Post by The Shark » Tue Jan 29, 2008 8:55 am

I can tell you all first hand that no police officer is going to arrest or give a kayaker any hassle if they have a knife on them while kayaking. If you stop for a break at a beach cafe and start showing or playing with your knife well then some one may feel threatened and contact the police and in which case you may get nicked. Likewise if you're driving to or from your location then make sure it is with your equipment in the boot and in a bag and dont put it in the glove or side compartments.

Taxi drivers think they are a special bunch and quite often carry weapons. Its a commonsense thing which as kayakers we all have so dont do anything to attract someones attention. My advice is also never to carry a machete, like guns there is never a good reason to carry one in the UK. Hope this helps.

Steve

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Post by NeilG » Tue Jan 29, 2008 4:47 pm

I'm inclined to agree with The Shark, although the police north of the border may view things differently. Certainly in England & Wales, a purposeful knife (such as a diver's or sailing knife) is not going to cause you a probem, providing it is carried discretely and for a good reason ie the 'reasonable excuse' test. As long as it is not one of the listed blades (ie a lock knife) then you will be fine. Parade it about or use it inappropriately and you are asking for trouble...

I only have a folding sailing knife with a short thick blade that I can open with cold fingers.
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Post by Ligan » Tue Jan 29, 2008 10:15 pm

Hello

on the subject of "rescue and emergency" knives, Fixed versus folding? etc. in an emergency situation your knife needs to be readily to hand and useable one handed, blind and quite possibly underwater. A folding knife is going to be about as much use as a chocolate tea pot, you need to have warm dexterous hands to open and use it. My preference is for a short fixed bladed knife with a rounded tip, big clumpy handle and serrated blade (gerber) yes its obvious on my ba but its also obvious that it you are not carrying it as a wepon or coverty carrying it.
when i discussed this with the local plod their view was if you were carrying it in the centre of town you would get lifted, but on a river or sea it was not a problem provided you were not harassing the public.
On a realistic side the most use my knife gets it making lunch and the blunt tip means i don't hole my kit when i drop it. Have I ever used an knife in an emergency? yes and every time it was to removed bits of dumped monfill fishing line or plastic bags that you cant see until is wrapped around your arm and your running out of air.
ta pete

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Post by journeyman » Wed Jan 30, 2008 10:07 am

Carrying a rocket flare that has the potential to blow a hole through the middle of somebody and we are worried about a bit of steel!
The world has gone mad.

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Mark99
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Post by Mark99 » Wed Jan 30, 2008 11:20 am

[quote="sinkingpete"]Hello

My preference is for a short fixed bladed knife with a rounded tip, big clumpy handle and serrated blade (gerber) yes its obvious on my ba but its also obvious that it you are not carrying it as a wepon or coverty carrying it.

Can you give a bit more info on this knife please? It sounds handy, Thanks

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Post by Ligan » Wed Jan 30, 2008 11:44 am

hello ,
the knife in question is called a "gerber river guide", if you google it sp services have them.

pete

[/img]

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Post by Mark99 » Wed Jan 30, 2008 1:40 pm

Thanks sinkingpete,looks just the job. That or the Runner

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waltfos
Posts: 297
Joined: Mon Feb 13, 2006 3:54 pm
Location: Largs

KNIVES

Post by waltfos » Wed Jan 30, 2008 3:31 pm

sinkingpete wrote:hello ,
the knife in question is called a "gerber river guide", if you google it sp services have them.

pete

[/img]
http://www.spservices.co.uk/product_inf ... ucts_id/50

Mark

If thats the one you want try here!

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Gerber-Knife-Safe ... dZViewItem


I use this one has a blade length of 2 3/4" but bought it in scuba shop UK

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/DEVIL-Titanium-BC ... dZViewItem

Keep shoogling

Walt

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MikeB
Posts: 7958
Joined: Tue Apr 29, 2003 9:44 pm
Location: Scotland

Post by MikeB » Wed Jan 30, 2008 6:31 pm

Accepting that the question is about the actual legalities as distinct from the practical application, I have had the pleasure of standing (dressed in p[addling gear) beside a police superintendent who was involved in a charity raft race on the Noth at Dumfries. It was mid afternoon and we were surrounded by several hundred participants and general public.

While enjoying convivial conversation with said senior policeman (on duty, in uniform) I was somewhat aware that a bright yellow Gerber river-knife was somewhat prominantly displayed on my ba and was certainly in his line of vision.

Nothing was said.

Perhaps he didn't recognise it for what it was. Then again, perhaps he did.

I rather suspect however that were I to wander into a Glasgow pub with a knife so publically displayed the conversation would be different. I wouldn't carry a flare there either!

Having thought about it, I've just realised that I carry a short folding lock-knife and a generic Leatherman (with blades) in my (sea) ba, a large and very sharp folding lock knife in my general kit, an old swiss army knife and also a generic s/army knife in my tool kit, a genuine Leatherman and a Silky saw when overnighting.

That's a lot of cutting power - I always have a s/army knife with me during the ordinary working day as well. I guess I'm just a serial law-breaker.

Mike.

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