Restoring a Sea King^

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peakfreak
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Restoring a Sea King^

Post by peakfreak » Wed Jan 09, 2008 9:35 pm

Whilst I am waiting for the next trade up in my paperclip blog (UKRGB recent post) I have decided to do a bit of restoration on the Sea King sea kayak I have obtained, to make it even more inviting than it already is; though my wife is not too happy about my decision :-).
It should be quite an interesting venture as I am more used to restoring Landrovers, this will be my first go at a water bourne craft.

So I am looking for a seat and rear hatch cover for a Sea King.

My sisters boyfriend is a body worker and has stupidly agreed to help me and has suggested to see if anyone may have a mould for the Sea King seat or a Sea King which he can make a cast from, so if anyone can help that would be grand.
He has also asked what is involved in the taping of the seams, are the tapes a kit or is it just a reinforcement tape with resin overlayed?

I am led to believe that the original colour for the Sea King was all white, is this true?

Finally, and this may be a long shot but has anyone got any design plans available of a Sea King.

Any help or suggestions would be very much appreciated.

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al27
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Post by al27 » Wed Jan 09, 2008 10:01 pm

Seaking... name rings a bell.

I dont have an original seat moulding, I do have the all new and improved cockpit rim (with or without thigh braces) and sepatate seat moulding if thats of any interest? I'll be at the show and could knock you out a set if you want (couple of bottles of Hobgoblin should cover the materials!!).
Tape seam, pretty much as you said; mask the edges, abrade, glass tape, gelcoat with a bit of wax in styrene, bobs your uncle.
Don't know about the colour...

Al.

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Jim
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Post by Jim » Wed Jan 09, 2008 11:50 pm

Some heathens find them a bit tippy with the original seat, you may be as well buying a foam one from Knoydart and fitting it instead - assuming that you do have the cockpit rim, to which the seat is normally moulded.

Unless it has come from some modified deck mould the hatches are almost certainly the old school size (17cm or something). If it takes a rubber cover, it will almost certainly be the standard valley round hatch (knoydart should have them), if it is a screw on type, whilst you are getting your hands dirty, carefully cut/chisel/grind/unbolt it out (depending on how it is attached) and replace with a complete standard valley round hatch (complete kits with coaming and cover are available). The screw types always jam, by their nature the worst jams are when your fingers are frozen and you really need to get something out to warm them up with....

Al clearly has the most serviceable mould since he has only recently restored and modified it, but these were originally mainly built in moulds that could be rented for home construction and there are quite a few kicking about. Being mainly home built, I don't think there would ever really have been a standard colour. Mine has an orange deck on an orange hull.

I think Mike has added the how-to threads for things like re-seaming to the almanac section so have a look around.

Jim

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Post by Geoff Seddon » Thu Jan 10, 2008 10:11 pm

We became the holders of a set of Sea King moulds last year,as well as some other assorted stuff. location - Bolton.
Geoff

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Post by MikeB » Thu Jan 10, 2008 11:01 pm

I think Mike has added the how-to threads for things like re-seaming to the almanac section so have a look around.
Indeed I did.

Looking at the pictures on the paperclip blog (what a good idea!) it seems as though someone has already cut out the seat pan and stuck in a bit of foam as a seat. Sadly, they also seem to have taken out virtually all of the side portion so it's going to be impossible to add a backrest.

If you want to avoid all the hassle of trying to remove the remaining rim (which is fun - not) the simplest thing to do would be get a decent foam seat (Knoydart) and build up a backrest against the rear bulkhead with foam.

The V profile of the hull will need to have some foam cut to shape to give you a flat base for the new foam seat.

While you're at it, dump the hand pump and fit a bulkhead behind the seat instead, filling the pump's hole with a suitable hatch. Again, the Almanac has details.

Sea Kings are a bit "tippy" because of their pronounced chines and fairly old design and need some weight unless expedition loaded. So fit some ballast into it - a BDH full of lead will do nicely, secured with Fastex buckles nicely glassed in to make a neat job of it.

If you can tolerate refurbishing Landies then this will be a walk in the park for you!! Enjoy.

Mike.

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Jim
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Post by Jim » Fri Jan 11, 2008 12:21 am

Hmm, completely failed to look at the blog before!

Mike, I reckon he has the base for a foam seat already, that's the bit that is left! For that and the hatch cover try Knoydart, that usually have both in stock.

Peakfreak - I take it you are just adding a bit of value in the hope that you can trade it up to a burn?

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Post by peakfreak » Fri Jan 11, 2008 12:54 am

Jim wrote:Peakfreak - I take it you are just adding a bit of value in the hope that you can trade it up to a burn?
That is pretty much my intention but knowing me once I get started I will end up in the "little bit more" situation. You know what I mean... you say to yourself "I will just restore X" and then when you've done that you then think well I've done that I might aswell do a "little bit more" :-)

With all the advice you guys have given in this thread (thanks to you all for that), I must admit the old Landy type restore bug I used to get has started to rear it's ugly head again. :-) I have also been browsing through the Almanac and there are a couple of modifications on there I wouldn't mind trying out ;-)

But to start off with I want to get a seat into the craft and get the seams taped and then see how she floats.
I think I might look at Mikes suggestion of dumping the deck pump and fitting a new bulkhead whilst I'm at it as it will make the installation of the seat plan I was looking at much easier to build.

I have given the hull the once over and there is a, ahem... "repair" been made which will need, at the very least tidying up but all in all it looks pretty sound.

Al, what is the "show" you have refered to? Is it the canoe expo? I'm more of an Olde Trip or Snek Lifter kinda guy but if Hobgoblin is your tipple then Hobgolin it is. 8-) I will let you know about the cockpit rim once I have given the whole craft a good looking over and photographed it all.

Cheers guys

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Post by sub5rider » Fri Jan 11, 2008 11:13 am

Jim wrote:... Mine has an orange deck on an orange hull.Jim
Not that much of it is ever visible ... ;)

Image

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MikeB
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Post by MikeB » Fri Jan 11, 2008 7:03 pm

Ah yes - now that's what I call "ballasting" - - -

But I said "in" - not "on" - - -

;-)

Mike

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Jim
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Post by Jim » Fri Jan 11, 2008 8:53 pm

Interestingly when Rob flashed up another infamous photo of me on his laptop in the pub the other day, he came very close to re-enacting it himself within a few days.

Good luck staying afloat this season Nigel :-)

Jim

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Post by MikeB » Fri Jan 11, 2008 11:10 pm

Which of the many infamous photos would that be then???????????

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peakfreak
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Post by peakfreak » Sun Jan 13, 2008 11:01 am

Well I made a start on the Seaking yesterday and after 5 mins I decided, instead of just re-taping the seams and fitting a seat, I might aswell do a proper job of the restoration. Much to the dismay of my wife :-)

I have stripped of all the ancillaries, rigging and hatches etc as the seals around the hatches were a mess with crap sealant, needed cleaning up and fitting correctly. There are also a couple of holes around the seam that will need dealing with.

Eventually I will need to move the craft to get it re-sprayed and seeing that I have removed the hatch rings will that weaken the integrity of the structure?
If it does would you advise that I put the hatch rings back in temporarily (without sealant but handtighten the screws) or am I looking at using a flatback vehicle instead of roofbars to move her?

Thanks in advance.

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Jim
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Post by Jim » Sun Jan 13, 2008 11:51 am

Personally I have always thought that re-spraying a kayak is a waste of time. Once used it will get scratched and dirty and stuff, the original finish is about as hard wearing as you will get.

Which I suppose should bring us to a question for Nick Crowhurst - how is the paint job on the HM a year or so on?

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Post by Chris Bolton » Sun Jan 13, 2008 1:53 pm

I doubt removing the hatch rings will make much difference, and if it does, it suggests the boat is too shot to be worth spending any time on. If you pick it up and and it creaks and distorts you have a problem, otherwise not.

I agree with Jim about the respray.

Chris

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Post by peakfreak » Sun Jan 13, 2008 4:41 pm

Thanks guys re the hatch rings, I was just a little curious about it as I have experienced problems with fibreglass bodied vehicles where, if you took out the windscreens etc which play an integral part to the structure of bodywork, should you then move the shell incorrectly, they had a tendency to crack.

With regards to the paint job, what exactly are you saying? Are you saying just brush paint the kayak?
The original paint job is in a pretty poor state and once I have feathered down the repairs and removed the "customised" black diamonds, it will need some kind of finish.

What would you all suggest for the paint job? Maybe a fine brush finished job with loads of t-cut and wax or something else.
I have heard that marine varnish is not the way to go.

Mmm puzzled :-s

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Jim
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Post by Jim » Sun Jan 13, 2008 5:42 pm

GRP panels on vehicles are much larger, usually thinner and tend to be flatter, than the decks of sea kayaks, therefore they flex and are more likely to develop cracks. The shape of the recess and the extra thickness of laminate around it (the deck is joined at each hatch) will provide more strength than the hatch coaming itself, the hatches are also close to the bulkheads.

I was trying to avoid commenting on the bolted hatch coamings, if you are going the whole hog, you will fill the holes and then laminate the coamings in place under the deck (if they will go through the holes), Bolted coamings often turn out to be the source of leaks and all those nuts and last threads on the inside snag your gear and knuckes when packing.

As for the paint job, are you telling us that the black diamonds are painted on? GRP boats have pigmented gelcoat which is part of the laminate and gives a shiny neat looking surface. Paint applied to that surface has a tendancy to flake off and get scratched. You can get etch primers and stuff to make the paint adhere better, but in my opinion you are better off sticking with the built in colour. So if the black is additional and looking tatty I would suggest stripping it and then polishing up the gelcoat underneath - use something like Farecla polishing compounds rather than just T-cut if you ever want to finish, T-cut is OK for the final polish but something a bit more aggressive is useful to start with.

Now I know what you are thinking now, if you just polish what is there you are going to end up with nasty grey patches of filler (or maybe redif you use epoxy). DONT use isopon! It is not a car! Structural repairs will be done mainly on the inside, for the exterior repairs use gelcoat the same colour as the boat (mixed with 2% liquid wax so it sets in air) - or a gelcoat filler, which is the same stuff prepared for your convenience. Feather the area before you start, apply the gelcoat as close as you can to the original surface line, and when it is hard (next day ideally) take it back level with P400 wet and dry (wet) and the work gently down through the grades (getting finer) to finish with polishing compound. If you can match the colour it is possible to make almost invisible repairs this way.

Does the boat have a keel strip? If not I strongly recommend it to cut down wear and tear on tear that bottom v chine - most people will look for one when buying second hand. Also if there is no keep strip, you might want to inspect the keel carefully for cracks, before I put my strip on I found a lot of cracks in my keel, but as noted I do load the boat heavily and often don't have the luxury of a sandy beach to land on.

Jim

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Post by Chris Bolton » Sun Jan 13, 2008 6:27 pm

Bren,

Have a read about how Nick Crowhurst renovated his Nordkapp. This should give you some ideas of the best way to refinish it.

http://www.ukriversguidebook.co.uk/foru ... hp?t=16330

Chris

PS - where does this leave the paperclip swap chain? Is it just on hold while you renovate the Sea King to a more swappable value or are you going to keep the Sea King and start with a new paperclip - because I did note in your other thread that you're wondering about doing some sea paddling?

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Post by peakfreak » Sun Jan 13, 2008 7:44 pm

Chris Bolton wrote: PS - where does this leave the paperclip swap chain? Is it just on hold while you renovate the Sea King to a more swappable value or are you going to keep the Sea King and start with a new paperclip - because I did note in your other thread that you're wondering about doing some sea paddling?
Cheers for the link Chris.

Just to clarify, my intention is to continue with the paperclip chain. As you have said it is just sort of on hold whilst I make the Seaking a little more swappable. If anyone still wants to swap whilst the Seaking is in dry dock (excuse the pun) and carry on with the restoration then I will still be open to offers.
As for the sea paddling, yes I am wanting to have a go and a nice UKRGB member has kindly offered to take me in the not too distant future.
I won't name the person for fear of said person being ridiculed for taking a muppet like me out. :-)

I will be updating the paperclip blog shortly to reflect my intentions but I am also putting together a bit of a restoration blog and want to link the 2 together.

Jim - Thanks for your detailed reply especially with regards to the hatch coamings. The black diamonds are just painted on and as you say are easily scratched and look a bit tatty. I am sure when they first went on they looked pretty cool but I want the craft to look smart. I don't think it will be glass shiny when I have finished but I want it to be a good catch for whoever takes it on.
As for the coamings, whoever put them on made a bit of a hash when they did, The sealant was a mess and had overspilt onto the hatch rims and on the front hatch, I am not sure just what they used as sealant but it has turned into what can only be described as coal! There was even a 3/4 inch plywood ring that was being used as a gasket.
I am going to rebolt them back on but when I was in the REME I remember using a latex based rubber sheeting to create gaskets for sealing hull plates onto tanks. I have put the feelers out for a sheet of this to redo the hatch gaskets. Sounds a bit extreme I know but this stuff is strong and extra squidgy so it will form itself into the deck without making an unsightly mess.

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Post by Jim » Sun Jan 13, 2008 10:40 pm

First thing then is to strip off the black paint and try polishing the gelcoat. An electric polisher is a great asset and you probably have one from restoring landy's, but if not elbow grease will do the job if you have time and patience.

If after that it is beyond looking smart, will Chris gave you the best link...

Sounds like someone has used builders mastic to seal the hatches, nice (not). You could choose from a lot of different rubbers for a gasket, or just use sikaflex 291.

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Post by Pav » Mon Jan 14, 2008 9:01 am

Bren,

I have several boxes of paper clips which you can choose from. I reckon that would be a fair swap for the sea king. After all each box has approx 100 paper clips so you should be able to get a whole fleet of kayaks with your skills! ,You just need the confidence to swap.

PM me your details and we can arrange a time and place for you to view my paper clips, or if you want I can send some photos.

Pav ;<)

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Post by peakfreak » Mon Jan 14, 2008 9:17 am

Pav wrote:Bren,

I have several boxes of paper clips which you can choose from. I reckon that would be a fair swap for the sea king. After all each box has approx 100 paper clips so you should be able to get a whole fleet of kayaks with your skills! ,You just need the confidence to swap.

PM me your details and we can arrange a time and place for you to view my paper clips, or if you want I can send some photos.

Pav ;<)
Very tempting Pav, your genorous offer has been noted and I shall be in touch should I wish to take this further. :-D

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Post by peakfreak » Sat Jan 26, 2008 7:05 pm

Suggestions Please:

The hollows where the rigging goes through (not sure of the correct terminology) have had a pretty poor patch up job on them in the past, see pic below to understand what I mean.
Anyhow I have tried feathering them back and shaping as best I can with them but they look a bit tatty, Even after they have been coated I don't envisage them to look thier best, so I was considering filling them completely and sanding them smooth and then using surface mounted rigging fixings.

So am I mad to do that and if not what would you suggest I fill them with?

If I am mad what would you suggest to get them to look thier best?

Thanks in advance.

Image

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Post by Chris Bolton » Sat Jan 26, 2008 8:49 pm

The technical name is Recessed Deck Fitting (RDF). What I would do is to paint them with "gelcoat" (see below) to match the deck colour, then sand the deck surface back to flat, leaving the recess with a layer of gelcoat as painted. The difficult bit is getting a good match between your infill and the deck, but you have that problem whether you fill the whole recess as you suggested, or just fill the chips in the deck and coat the inside of the recess with the thinnest layer which will give consistent colour. Surface fittings are not often used; they tend to catch the paddle or knuckles, make a hard spot in rescues and it's difficult to make them strong and watertight.

You'll need a resin which is thixotropic enough not to flow into the bottom of the recess, and thick enough to fill the chips back up to deck level. Although gelcoat is what you're patching, you can't use gelcoat as used on a new boat, because it's designed to stay tacky for the next coat, and only set hard when not exposed to air (ie, the surface against the mould). Earlier in the thread, Jim suggested using gelcoat with 2% wax; alternatively you could use ordinary resin with thixotropic additive - in both cases with appropriate colour.

One variation would be to use a vertical shutter made from pvc tape to extend the edge of the recess upwards. Then you don't need a (such a) thixotropic resin.

Care is needed not to fill the holes for the rope with resin! Maybe a length of plastic tube (or clothes line?) very well waxed and threaded through the holes?

I'm assuming here that you are expecting to spend a bit of time on this to get it right!

Chris

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Post by nickcrowhurst » Sat Jan 26, 2008 8:51 pm

Jim wrote:Which I suppose should bring us to a question for Nick Crowhurst - how is the paint job on the HM a year or so on?
I'm on an extended paddling trip in the Gulf of Mexico, and haven't had access to the forum for weeks, hence the delay in answering. Anyway, I'm sitting under a palm tree in a wireless hot-spot, and just noticed this post. When I stripped off the original thick paint, the glass hull was revealed to be almost as new, so I just polished it as described:
http://www.ukriversguidebook.co.uk/foru ... g+nordkapp
You can see the finish in one of the photos.
I agree with Jim, spray painting is at the bottom of my list of options for an old glass boat.
Nick.

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Post by Jim » Sun Jan 27, 2008 8:27 pm

Look like badly retrofitted RDFs, either that or some cheapskate has just made them by adding plasticine to the mould (it works to fair small areas and joints between mould parts, i.e. making a fillet between a temporary RDF mould and the main deck mould to disguise the join, in this case it looks like maybe the RDF mould itself was made entirely of plasticine...).

Chris method will work fine, but will take quite a bit of work. Personally I have RDFs for my deck lines, but my elastics originally had half RDFs - imagine just once scallop with the hole drilled through into the boat, the elastic threads, knot tied and then the knot and hole laminated over on the inside. Awful solution, after a few years you need to tension or replace the elastics and it becomes a massive job. These elastics (well the replacements which I bedded in silicone rather than glassing ove - it didn't work they weep a bit) are still there but I don't use them, I have used Valley Topcleats to lay out my elastics in a configuration I want. They are bolted on but relatively low profile, I have never yet snagged my knuckles on them, BUT they aren't really strong enough for the decklines. For decklines you would be looking at a decent sized fairlead or stainless steel lacing eye if you wanted to do away with the RDFs. As Chris says most of us don't like those sort of things!

Anyway, I haven't quite decided what to do about my half scallops, they will be filled this year (elastics removed first) but I and not decided about whether to just stop up the holes, or do somethign more like your suggestion/question and cut them out and make the deck flush.

This is a feasible project but a lot will depend on the amount of access - I am looking at the area immediately in front of my cockpit, I don't think I would consider this way up in the ends where some of the RDFs are.

Basically you need to find a thick plastic sheet that will happily bend to match the curvature of the deck (and them tape it in place like mad) but will be stiff enough for you to work against it from the inside. Mylar is probably good, you might find something cheaper. Decide which side will be the side against the boat, And apply several coats of mould release wax, just to make sure! Carefully cut the offending fittings out of the deck, a jigsaw with a diamond blade is ideal for this but takes some getting used to controlling....
Sand the area on the inside around each hole, there will be some remnants of the bulge to remove but you also want to make sure you key it up for laminating to later. Wear thick gloves, glassfibre splinters are not fun, they are near invisible and very very small, irritating etc. Also wear a decent dust mask.

When you have it cleaned up, and a wipe with acetone or cellulose thinners rarely goes amiss, but give it enough time to evaporate, tape your plastic mould (or moulds, might as well do them all at once). Now you want to gel coat the plastic mould from the inside (as neatly as you can, you want to get it quite thick and do it in only 1 or 2 brush strokes - the longer you faff with it, the more chance you will just drag it off again and leave brush lines in the finish).

The gelcoat needs to cure for an hour or so (find some data sheets for %age catalyst to use and how long it will take), then carefully brush some resin on - that is key because the gel coat will be tacky and you could rip it off if the glass touches it and you have to move the glass around.

Now for such small areas my preference is to wet the glass out off the job and then offer it up and smooth it out - in this case this will be better than working directly against that plastic sheet... I have only used this technique with epoxy resin, but as long as you measure the catalyst accurately for the working temperature and spread the strips out thinly to prevent premature exothermic reaction, it should be possible with polyester too. You need a wetting out board, an old door is good but a piece of plywood or something is fine. Use a roller, wet the board well, lay a few strips on and wet them through with the roller (they will go transparent). Oh yeah, use tape or woven cloth, not chopped strand mat, that will just fall apart at this stage!

You initial pieces want to fit fairly well in the hole to build up to the same thickness as the rest of the deck, after that you can use longer/wider pieces to overlap the existing laminate. I would suggest using bigger and bigger pieces so each covers the edges of the previous one (the edges may be sharp when cured, this saves some sanding) to make up the same thickness again so you retain the strength of the connection. Smooth out the air at each stage, dont worry if the whole job is a bit wetter than would be ideal for a perfect laminate, it is a drawback to the technique that you have to keep the pieces wet. You will need to work fast and be aware for the resin starting to thicken and go off, when that happens leave whatever is left on the board and move to a fresh area and start again (hopefull the initial stuff will cure by the time the second area goes and you can move back to it, with epoxy you can just keep working in the same spot but paint more resin on and leave abandon the pieces in the resin that is setting.

If your gel coat was pigmented right you should be able to peel off the plastic and see an immaculate repair. Chances are you will see a black line around it unless you feather the edges of the hole back to about 45 degrees initially to make sure the gelcoat overlaps slightly. If you have a black line, just carefully sand a shallow vee in the gelcoat and fill and finish it as previously described.

It may be worth testing your gelcoat on a piece of plastic in advance to see if the cured colour matches your deck - if not you may need to mix some grey pigment in to make it slightly off white or something - use pigment very sparingly! Also if the styrene in the gelcoat makes the plastic curl up or pucker, it's worth knowing in advance....

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Post by Chris Bolton » Sun Jan 27, 2008 11:57 pm

Good stuff, Jim. I was thinking that what Peakfreak had in mind was filling the recesses with isopon and putting a skin of gelcoat over them, then polishing it flat, but your description may be what he meant. However, once you go to the trouble of cutting out the old RDFs, and keying a laminate to the underside of the deck, wouldn't it be possible to put in new RDFs?

On way to make a well fitting mould for the deck surface, if it happens to be curved (if using Jim's method) - rather than taping plastic over the hole, wax the immediately adjacent deck, apply release agent, laminate on a small square, when cured remove, polish and use as the mould for the deck next to it.

Chris

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Post by Jim » Mon Jan 28, 2008 9:49 am

Chris Bolton wrote:However, once you go to the trouble of cutting out the old RDFs, and keying a laminate to the underside of the deck, wouldn't it be possible to put in new RDFs?
Absolutely, but I kind of figured that if his previous bodywork experience was enough to give him the confidence for that slightly more fiddly option, he would come up with the possibility on his own and work out the details :) My post was long enough already!

Good plan regarding taking a part mould off the deck, I'm not sure the curvature is even enough for this but it is worth investigating. I was at one point going to build a mould to fit hatch recesses to a couple of ancient Nordkapps my old club had, but they swapped/sold them before I ever got round to it, and I left. I would have started with that kind of approach - take a mould off the deck, build up the recess part onto the mould, make the parts and then insert them into the deck, probably using the mould to aid alignment as they would still have fitted on the deck....

A lot is possible if you have time and have mastered the basics - some of these projects would be a nightmare if you are the kind of person who just finds that fibreglass hates you and ends up sticking to everything except the bit you want it to :)

Jim

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Post by Helen M » Mon Jan 28, 2008 10:08 pm

WARNING!!!!!

Peakfreak DO NOT continue with this mad quest for a Burn. You have a gem of a boat - a Seaking. I learnt to sea kayak in one thanks to Tim. Yes - it is tippy - yes, packing it is a dark art - but that is the same for any seakayak! You are already half way to falling in love with it - all you really need to do now is paddle it. She will be the start of something magical - a whole new paddling experience. The world of spiritual enlightenment. Something money, or paperclips, can't buy!

Once you have given it away you will regret it.

H - x

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Post by peakfreak » Mon Jan 28, 2008 10:33 pm

Helen M wrote:WARNING!!!!!

Peakfreak DO NOT continue with this mad quest for a Burn. You have a gem of a boat - a Seaking. I learnt to sea kayak in one thanks to Tim. Yes - it is tippy - yes, packing it is a dark art - but that is the same for any seakayak! You are already half way to falling in love with it - all you really need to do now is paddle it. She will be the start of something magical - a whole new paddling experience. The world of spiritual enlightenment. Something money, or paperclips, can't buy!

Once you have given it away you will regret it.

H - x
Damn you Helen!!! :-) Why did you have to give such a good reasoned argument.

I have been constantly telling myself "It's going to be swapped" and not to get attached to it. I must admit it is a nice craft and with the TLC and titivating I am enjoying doing on it, it is hard not to keep thinking about how it would feel to take it for a bimble.
Last week I was in talks with someone who wanted it and I was a little dissapointed to think of it going. For perfectly valid personal reasons, the person in question has had to back out of the swap and I must admit I was more pleased than bothered when they pulled out.
BUT! I must be strong and see the venture through otherwise (as someone as already said to me) it would spoil the "spirit of the endeavour"

Ho hum :-]

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Helen M
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Joined: Wed Jul 21, 2004 6:40 am
Location: Dumfries, SW Scotland

Post by Helen M » Mon Jan 28, 2008 10:41 pm

peakfreak wrote:
Damn you Helen!!! :-) Why did you have to give such a good reasoned argument.

I have been constantly telling myself "It's going to be swapped" and not to get attached to it. I must admit it is a nice craft and with the TLC and titivating I am enjoying doing on it, it is hard not to keep thinking about how it would feel to take it for a bimble.
Last week I was in talks with someone who wanted it and I was a little dissapointed to think of it going. For perfectly valid personal reasons, the person in question has had to back out of the swap and I must admit I was more pleased than bothered when they pulled out.
BUT! I must be strong and see the venture through otherwise (as someone as already said to me) it would spoil the "spirit of the endeavour"

Ho hum :-]
The seed of doubt has been sown - it will continue to grow. My advice - Let it! A whole new world will open up. Am not saying anymore.

H - x

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