Warm Footwear^

Places, technique, kayaks, safety, the sea...
Post Reply
pamf
Posts: 108
Joined: Wed Aug 22, 2007 9:39 pm
Location: Cowal, Argyll, Scotland
Contact:

Warm Footwear^

Post by pamf » Wed Dec 05, 2007 10:27 am

I know there are other threads on footwear, however, I have a specific angle that, as a beginner, I'd like some expertise on. I would appreciate your thoughts on the best footwear for someone for whom maintaining warm feet is something of a priority (due to skin allergy: cold/cooling feet = torturous itch, not desirable when "trapped" in a boat!). Right now, I have a pair of Teva spider rubber-soled boots. They are OK, but I have lost feeling in a toe for 3 days using them in cold conditions, so I think I'd like something warmer (and, after a good barnacle slicing, grippier would be nice!). I don't have a dry suit.

Please pass on your thoughts, including any guidance you have on "accessorising", eg best types of socks etc, as I'm a bit confused about the combinations.

Many thanks!

Aleut
Posts: 19
Joined: Thu Jul 05, 2007 11:24 am

Post by Aleut » Wed Dec 05, 2007 10:36 am

Have just bought a pair of Chola Mukluks. They are absolutely superb....warm...dry...comfy... nuff said.

Rhiannon
_______________

heliospanoptes.blogspot.com

Jon Wood
Posts: 558
Joined: Fri Sep 23, 2005 12:23 pm
Location: London

Post by Jon Wood » Wed Dec 05, 2007 10:40 am

I'm one of many who use wellies. Combined with a Reed transpire sock I find that is warm even when damp. The Transpire socks are great for rinsing and drying.

If you have a bigger budget, quite a few people swear by the Mukluk. The range can be seen here.

User avatar
NeilG
Posts: 366
Joined: Tue Oct 31, 2006 6:26 pm
Location: SOLENT (Titchfield) UK
Contact:

Post by NeilG » Wed Dec 05, 2007 8:16 pm

Jon Wood wrote:I'm one of many who use wellies. Combined with a Reed transpire sock I find that is warm even when damp. The Transpire socks are great for rinsing and drying.

If you have a bigger budget, quite a few people swear by the Mukluk. The range can be seen here.
I tried wellies the other day and try as I may, I managed to get water in them twice, once getting out and once getting in. One was a shallow sandy beach and the other a steep shingle one. As a result, my toes were just as cold as when I where wet boots (as usual).

What is the secret to keeping your boots empty?
Experience: something you get, just after you needed it...

Solent Kayak Pages

User avatar
CaptainSensible
Posts: 666
Joined: Sat Apr 23, 2005 3:17 pm
Location: somewhere hot

Post by CaptainSensible » Wed Dec 05, 2007 9:36 pm

I often get cold water in my wetsuit/neoprene socks (if I capsize and have to swim), but you don't notice it after a couple of minutes because the trapped water gets heated to body temperature by your feet. On their own (with non-waterproof socks), most shoes don't offer much protection from the cold.

I wear thermal socks under dry trousers in the winter (and neoprene socks over the dry trouser socks if it's really cold - I don't wear shoes whilst paddling), but a pair of thermal/wool/fleece socks + a pair of aquatherm socks (made by the same people who make the fleece socks that Jon W linked to) + your shoes should be fine. The only downside is that you might have to go up a shoe size.

User avatar
Robert Craig
Posts: 665
Joined: Tue Aug 23, 2005 8:55 pm
Location: Glasgow

Stick with wellies!

Post by Robert Craig » Wed Dec 05, 2007 9:43 pm

I swear by wellies (B&Q £9.95) - with thick socks if cold. I'm very careful getting in and out, and a rarely get wet socks. But I paddle on the W of Scotland, where we rarely need to launch from exposed beaches.

User avatar
Sgian Dubh
Posts: 151
Joined: Tue May 29, 2007 4:20 pm
Location: An t-Eilean Sgitheanach
Contact:

Post by Sgian Dubh » Wed Dec 05, 2007 10:52 pm

The woolly socks are a nono. The creature that scoures the Western Isles shores will suck them off your foot if you venture near the water wi'out wellies. You'll hang onto they clattering stones & pull ashore but you'll have cold bare toes. It's true I tell ye! Waders fea the Fishermans Coop - no more wet woollies - that's the way forward.

oh for a smilie
≈• Black Knife Blog•≈
≈•Qaannat Kattuffiat•≈

User avatar
Jim
Posts: 13497
Joined: Sun Apr 21, 2002 2:14 pm
Location: Dumbarton

Post by Jim » Thu Dec 06, 2007 1:12 pm

How about a couple of pairs of wooly socks under dry trousers, with another old pair to protect the latex feet and then your wellies. That way if you overtop your wellies, your feet stay dry and warmish.

Got some full length sailing wellies a couple of months ago to go yachting (the only bit you can't hire) - they are not expensive and are infinitely more comfortable than the B&Q/gardening wellies, softer and lined, and with a flat sole with razor cuts for grip on wet plastic.... Needless to say I will be trying them in the boat in place of my neoprene and rubber shoes, which do get cold when wet if you aren't actively moving your feet about.

User avatar
waltfos
Posts: 297
Joined: Mon Feb 13, 2006 3:54 pm
Location: Largs

warm feet

Post by waltfos » Thu Dec 06, 2007 4:41 pm

try these Kind of horsey but what the heck if the work any good equestrian centre

http://www.pedlars.co.uk/page_1494.html

Half welly half wet suit

Friend uses similar and swears by them

or maybe these

http://www.gardeningbritain.co.uk/goods ... Boots.html

Walt

User avatar
dorsetyeti
Posts: 43
Joined: Tue Jan 10, 2006 6:10 am
Location: Adelaide, South Australia

Post by dorsetyeti » Thu Dec 06, 2007 4:58 pm

There is also a brand of these reinforced wetsuit boot/wellies called muddies that my wife picked up at our local garden centre they do a calf and full length version and in more subdued colours. I have been looking at them for a while now thinking they would would make excellent seakayaking footwear. Just google muddies and you will get plenty of hits
Cheers me dears

Dorset yeti

pamf
Posts: 108
Joined: Wed Aug 22, 2007 9:39 pm
Location: Cowal, Argyll, Scotland
Contact:

Thanks!

Post by pamf » Fri Dec 07, 2007 12:36 pm

Thanks everyone for all the great replies. Will need to decide on what to ask Santa for (the monster wellies do have their appeal ...!).

MattB
Posts: 188
Joined: Thu Mar 16, 2006 7:57 pm

footwear

Post by MattB » Sun Dec 09, 2007 8:28 pm

I'm surprised that folk are still advising wellies. Have you tried swimming in them? Re-entering a boat in them? I feel they are not the safest footwear for sea paddling, they must cause negative bouyancy when full of water. Sailing wellies maybe better, but B and Q wellies should surely be kept for the garden. Mukluks for winter, wetsuit boots for the summer. I agree with the comment on reed chillcheater socks, but find they don't last more than a weeks sea paddling without leaking. I don't think they like the sand rubbing.

Wellies may sound like an ideal paddling shoe, but wait until you swim in them.

To sum up, dress for immersion, same applies for paddling shoes!!

Matthew

Owen
Posts: 2106
Joined: Tue Apr 19, 2005 4:42 pm
Location: Nr Stirling
Contact:

Post by Owen » Sun Dec 09, 2007 9:28 pm

You can swim in wellies; just. How can a boot full of water which is immersed in water have negative bouyancy? Its an old fishermans wives tale that wellies will drag you down. They only make it hard to swim in because you can't move your ankle very much in them.
I have Reed socks fitted onto the ends of my salopettes I put thick walking socks underneath and Teva Gamma's (trainers) on top; feet stay nice and warm.

tape34
Posts: 433
Joined: Mon Feb 27, 2006 1:16 pm
Location: North Yorks

Re: footwear

Post by tape34 » Mon Dec 10, 2007 10:06 pm

MattB wrote:I'm surprised that folk are still advising wellies. Have you tried swimming in them? Re-entering a boat in them? ...........
To sum up, dress for immersion, same applies for paddling shoes!!
Matthew
Soft flexible wellies with woolley socks, my paddling pants go over my wellies and a latex seal under my socks, if someone made suitable waders I'd wear them.

I don't dress for immersion if I'm touring but for walking up slippy, rocky, muddy beaches because that's what I'll be doing more often (typically west coast of Scotland).

On the other hand if I'm going out to play in a tide race then I agree, wear white water kit.
Pete Ball

User avatar
NeilG
Posts: 366
Joined: Tue Oct 31, 2006 6:26 pm
Location: SOLENT (Titchfield) UK
Contact:

Post by NeilG » Tue Dec 11, 2007 8:46 pm

Tonight I went out to see the Queen Victoria off from Southampton on her maiden voyage. I experimented with a Gortex sock, which comes a long way up my leg. I had my left foot in the sock and my right foot without. As usual, I wore by Aigle wet suit boots.

After and hour and half of watching fireworks and playing in the surf generated by the armada of ribs also out for occasion, I found that my left foot was dry, cold and numb, my right foot wet and warm.

The temperature had dropped from 3.5 degrees to 0.5 by the time we had got back. I actually had frost on my deck for the first time ever.

My fingers were another story altogether... It took two pints to warm them up in the pub.
Experience: something you get, just after you needed it...

Solent Kayak Pages

User avatar
Helen M
Posts: 1717
Joined: Wed Jul 21, 2004 6:40 am
Location: Dumfries, SW Scotland

Post by Helen M » Tue Dec 11, 2007 9:37 pm

Owen wrote:I have Reed socks fitted onto the ends of my salopettes I put thick walking socks underneath and Teva Gamma's (trainers) on top; feet stay nice and warm.
Agree with Owen - I have socks fitted to my drysuit.

However, thermal socks under drysuit socks - with tevas ontop does the job.

H - x

User avatar
Cornholio
Posts: 579
Joined: Mon Oct 09, 2006 8:36 pm
Location: Kincraig- "This Is NOT The Sea!"

Post by Cornholio » Tue Dec 11, 2007 11:59 pm

2 pairs of smartwool thermal socks inside the latex feet of my dry suit with Lomo 5mm diving bootees encasing the lot (= grip, sole's safe on rocks, latex protected and very warm...)
"God tells me he can get me out of this mess, but he's pretty sure you're f****d..."

Jon Wood
Posts: 558
Joined: Fri Sep 23, 2005 12:23 pm
Location: London

Post by Jon Wood » Wed Dec 12, 2007 7:03 am

NeilG wrote:Tonight I went out to see the Queen Victoria off from Southampton on her maiden voyage.
Image

I've just spent the last few days working on the ship-looking after the searchlights on the fore deck (I wasn't given the choice of the Led Zeppelin gig). The story of the non-smashing champagne bottle is long and tortuous, and I'd probably best not post it here!

Back to footwear-the wellies I use are by Aigle. A good combination of soft flexy upper and a decent sole for scrambling. And no problems swimming.

User avatar
active4seasons
Posts: 517
Joined: Thu Apr 21, 2005 10:19 pm
Location: Berwick, North Northumberland
Contact:

Post by active4seasons » Fri Dec 14, 2007 8:51 pm

Highly recommend the sealskin socks inside cheap wellies, go for knee length:
http://www.specialistsocks.co.uk/m10/Se ... _info.html
Ollie
Developing Desire for Adventure!

ian johnston
Posts: 658
Joined: Sat Dec 15, 2007 7:36 pm
Location: Aberdeenshire

Warm Footwear

Post by ian johnston » Wed Dec 19, 2007 11:58 am

Cornholio wrote:2 pairs of smartwool thermal socks inside the latex feet of my dry suit with Lomo 5mm diving bootees encasing the lot (= grip, sole's safe on rocks, latex protected and very warm...)
Yup, Lomo boots with socks and a drysuit - nice and warm, loads of grip and non-restrictive

modfrey
Posts: 1
Joined: Sat Mar 01, 2008 12:25 pm

Re: warm feet

Post by modfrey » Sat Mar 01, 2008 12:32 pm

It's gonna be monster wellies every time for me from now on!!

I know, I'm a fashion victim, but you got to look right or people won't take you seriously.

AllanC
Posts: 186
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2006 3:17 pm
Location: Gourock

Cold feet

Post by AllanC » Sat Mar 01, 2008 2:19 pm

Is there anywhere in/near Glasgow that stock the Plam Kola boots that are in this months OP? They look similar to the Chota's, which I know are brilliant but out of my price range. I've found them online, but I have wierd feet and need to try before I buy.

Thanks in advance.

Allan

User avatar
MikeB
Posts: 7958
Joined: Tue Apr 29, 2003 9:44 pm
Location: Scotland

Post by MikeB » Sat Mar 01, 2008 3:30 pm

Tiso have Palm stuff - maybe worth a call?

AllanC
Posts: 186
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2006 3:17 pm
Location: Gourock

Post by AllanC » Sat Mar 01, 2008 4:04 pm

I've tried their website, a chocolate fireguard springs to mind.

It's just up the hill from my uni though so I might have a look this week.

User avatar
Geoff Seddon
Posts: 283
Joined: Thu Jul 29, 2004 11:04 am
Location: Horwich

Post by Geoff Seddon » Sat Mar 01, 2008 10:37 pm

Equally important is the fit of whatever you have on your feet, also a paddling technique involving leg and foot movement, hands too, will promote circulation leading to warmer extremities. I have done a significant amount of paddling in wellies complete with steel toe caps and find them no hindrance to swimming, at which I am quite adept.
Geoff

User avatar
Mikebelluk
Posts: 562
Joined: Mon Jan 14, 2008 9:28 pm
Location: Merseyside

Post by Mikebelluk » Sun Nov 30, 2008 4:57 pm

I tried my new Gill long sailing wellies yesterday for the first time.
Very comfy and and warm and my feet were dry all day. I have replaced the tie laces in the neoprene tops with some shock cord and an adjuster and wore a pair of Thorlo winter grade wool socks. The footbed in them is better than that fitted in my Scarpa SL walking boots
Very pleased.

User avatar
Freek
Posts: 119
Joined: Sat Jan 06, 2007 9:03 am
Location: Netherlands
Contact:

Post by Freek » Mon Dec 01, 2008 3:50 pm

Nova and Kolaboots warning

I've tried them both. And send it back.......
The soles are way too long, so I can't move my feet in my North Shore Mariner.

The Kola and Nova boots have soles like this;
Image

I've bought the Chota mk200;
Image
The Chota MK150 have stiff soles and MK 250 have long soles, and doesn't fit in my kayak.
the MK 200 is the best choice with short soles.

http://chotooutdoorgear.net/shop/produc ... ucts_id=50

pamf
Posts: 108
Joined: Wed Aug 22, 2007 9:39 pm
Location: Cowal, Argyll, Scotland
Contact:

Warm feet

Post by pamf » Tue Dec 02, 2008 9:52 am

I see this thread has been resurrected so - for the sake of completion - thought I'd add in what I ended up getting. Indeed, I went for the Quicklace Chota Mukluks. I see there are some deals on these with certain retailers at the moment (Knoydart). I like them a lot - they've certainly kept my feet toasty. I wear them with my drysuit and, in an attempt to stop them filling up on the offchance (ha) that I should fall in, I pull the (Palm Aleutian) drysuit outerlayer over them. They are a little long for this, but I've got used to living with a "bumfle" (to use the technical term).

I also picked up a pair of Lomo wetsuit boots for summer wear (to replace old, done Tevas) - really good value at £21.

Where did that year go since my first post?!!

Scots_Charles_River
Posts: 830
Joined: Sun Feb 24, 2008 6:10 pm

Re: Warm Footwear

Post by Scots_Charles_River » Sun Dec 21, 2008 6:04 pm

I bought some CSKINS windsurf boots. 5mm neoprene and very warm dry or wet. They let in a little water and are warm right down to 2degs two weeks ago. Very comfy wet or dry, £25 new.

Enjoy warm feet !

Nick

John N
Posts: 468
Joined: Fri Apr 25, 2008 4:31 pm
Location: STOKENCHURCH, BUCKS.

Re: Warm Footwear^

Post by John N » Sun Dec 21, 2008 6:41 pm

I've used a neoprene changing mat (like a carpet in the boat) under my feet and it does me O.K. £10.00 for a nookie one or make your own from an old / cheap sleeping mat. And keep the legs warm. When I used to cycle to work in really cold weather I'd sometimes resort to tights and thermals under my tracksters and arrive with toasty feet.

Post Reply