Food on multiday trips^

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monkeyboy
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Food on multiday trips^

Post by monkeyboy » Fri May 11, 2007 6:24 pm

I was having a chat with a mate of mine recently and we were discussing the merits of various menus. So what would you take for your main meals on say a four day trip?
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Douglas Wilcox
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Post by Douglas Wilcox » Fri May 11, 2007 7:08 pm

I am particularly partial to curried potatoes made with fresh spices. Note the pressure cooker bottom right.

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It is however, hot thirsty work, which requires a cooling Guinness for the cook.

Douglas

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Cornholio
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Post by Cornholio » Fri May 11, 2007 7:10 pm

This is what I'd eat, every night for a week if I had to(and I have...!)

Cornholios Spicy Italian Cous Cous…
Ingredients:

125g cous cous
185g Tin of Princes Tuna in Brine (130g well drained)
20g Olive oil
10g Schwartz “Spicy Italian” herbs
Large clove of Garlic, crushed
Ground Black Pepper (add to taste)
250ml(g) Boiling water

Method:

Boil water in a pot with a lid.
Add the oil, drained tuna (broken up with fork)*, herbs, pepper and garlic and stir it.
Add the cous cous and stir briefly, put the lid on and let it boil for 10 secs then remove the pot and let it stand for 5-7 mins.
Either put it on a plate/bowl to eat or eat from the pot to save washing up

Ready to serve- this will provide approx 790 cals which are pretty well balanced- about 58% carbs, 17% protein and 25% fat (the healthy kind!)
It takes no time at all and tastes damn good too IMHO.

*A more travel friendly way I’ve used now is using tuna in sunflower oil, then the olive oil is not needed. But be sure to drain off a fair bit of the excess oil by squeezing the lid against the tuna meat or it’ll have you nauseous by the time you’ve finished!
Vegetarians could substitute the tuna with something else I suppose…gravel?
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Cornholio
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Post by Cornholio » Fri May 11, 2007 7:12 pm

oh- leave the lid on firm while it's standing...
"God tells me he can get me out of this mess, but he's pretty sure you're f****d..."

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Pelagic
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Post by Pelagic » Fri May 11, 2007 7:31 pm

uummm........no apperitives? no sweet, just main meals.......Ok.
Steak au poivre with new potatoes, green beans and mushrooms, crusty bread rolls and a robust red.
Gammon steaks, pan fried rostis with onions and garlic and egg or pineapple depending on taste (Alex prefers pineapple) possibly a Chilean cabernet Sauvignon to accompany.
Pork Char Sui stir fry, beansprouts, sugar snap peas etc. with egg fried rice or noodles. I would suggest a pinot noir, although it's always tricky with chinese food any left over Cabernet Sauvignon would be great with a black bean or Hoi sin dish.
Italian meatballs (you can prerpare these in advance) pasta sauce of choice and fresh pasta, a bit unconventional but a Reisling is a nice alternative to accompany.

Breakfasts would be a choice of Muesli, porridge or full English, but kippers are nice if toast can be provided. Alex is particularly fond of Variety pack cereals) Fruit juice.
Lunches would be a selection of cooked meats and cheese (Primula is especially nice with ham) Tortilla wraps, crisp salad and tomatoes,Crisps or nuts and biscuits. Salami sausage is very tasty and pepperoni can be eaten on the go, also makes a quite acceptable Cassoulet.
Supper and snacks can be anything classed as cake. Fruit cake and Stilton is very nice with a single malt.
Obviously chocolate, to choice,
a selection of beverages, not forgetting hot chocky (wth sprinkles)
Lager or beer of choice.
Surprise meals can be anything you can catch or gather, Moules marrinere, or Macarel salad, for example.

Or you could survive quite happily on de-hydrated crap.
Because there other more important considerations on a multi day trip but just off hand I can't remember what they are..........

Phil

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Post by monkeyboy » Fri May 11, 2007 7:35 pm

God that all sounds good-I'm hungry now!!!
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Cornholio
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Post by Cornholio » Fri May 11, 2007 7:52 pm

Is that a menu for a multiday trip with B+B every night?!Is there a "supply" kayak following you? Are you a "kayak pirate" sneaking on board yachts and raiding cupboards and fridges(and wine racks!) like the Black Magic "Bond"esque fella?!
Can anyone enlighten me how the stuff stays fresh for say 4 days, crusty rolls on day 4? Chewy as hell more like, and 4 day old pork, sweating away in a hot hull, day after day, mmmm...
As for "any left over Cabernet Sauvignon " HA! I'm a Scotsman- that would be first down the hatch- any food consumed after that would be divine, "rehydrated" crap a sheer delicacy!!!
"God tells me he can get me out of this mess, but he's pretty sure you're f****d..."

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lg18
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Post by lg18 » Fri May 11, 2007 8:05 pm

Drag the pork in the water and hope sharks don't get it! In the North Sea it will be about 9 deg so should keep a day or 2. For beef, it should be hung for 3 weeks anyway, so dragging in the water for at least week could surely only improve the flavour!!!

The claret should be just the "room temperature" in the sweaty hull!

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Pelagic
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Post by Pelagic » Fri May 11, 2007 9:42 pm

Can anyone enlighten me how the stuff stays fresh for say 4 days, crusty rolls on day 4?
Ok, but you must keep it a secret,
first off, be old enough to remember a time before refrigerators were essential, and experiment. Start fresh and work to tins then dehydrated.
Freeze your fresh meat solid and pack it in a small cool bag with a cooler block, if you can, buy the meat vaccum packed too.
Now bread.........
Crusty rolls are on day one, however Warby's type bread stays fresh much longer than that, all time world record for me was some bavarian black bread which lasted 10 days and made fantastic toast. Part baked rolls can be crisped up wrapped in foil in embers, As a last resort there are always Bannocks... (see Scouting for boys)
A lot of my mates swear by pitta bread but I only carry that if chilli is on the menu.
Totilla wraps last over a week and fit very snugly against any part of your hot sweaty hull that is handy. My hull only gets hot when left in the sun, this is usually fine because I put my cool stuff in the shade with a wet towel over it, it keeps it cool (evaporation refrigeration).
Meat will stay fresh easily 2-3 days if carried frozen in a cool bag.4-5 at cooler times of year. Pork seems to last longer than other fresh meat.
bacon and other cured meats, a week easy.
Salami and other sausage, longer than any trip I have done recently.
Eggs last 10 days or so, longer if smeared with vaseline, (never had to do this yet).
Fresh veg + salad stuff, I carry in the cockpit (doesnt mind getting wet) Potatoes are great roasted in the fire, they are also cunningly designed to be totally waterproof...........as is most fruit.
Rostis and potato salad are better using tinned tattys.
As for "any left over Cabernet Sauvignon " HA! I'm a Scotsman- that would be first down the hatch
Of course most of the other essentials have a much shorter shelf life....
and I was exagerating slightly about the wine list, Nigel and the girls however swear by a bag of white and a bag of red (without the box), which seems eminantly civilised, although I have no idea how they tell which is which.........
As they say "any fool can be uncomfortable" and we always come back with food, usually the de-hydrated "emergency" stuff........which is how it should be.
The smell of bacon and eggs frying on the last day is to die for....................

Phil

P.S I believe Haggis lasts well! and dont forget the condiments.

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Helen M
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Post by Helen M » Sat May 12, 2007 6:59 am

Like Douglas we often take the pressure cooker and have casseroles etc. |'m not a huge eater but do like the odd toastie which cooks to perfection in this little device:

Image

H - x

Think that one was bannana and cinnimon

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Cornholio
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Post by Cornholio » Sat May 12, 2007 10:32 am

Pelagic, I salute you! Seriously- some good tips there. I always thought pork was bacteria ridden(almost as bad as chicken!).Bacon a week? Is that the dry cured stuff? I presume the standard supermarket stuff would not last as long? Steaks are always a good bet, and I'll always carry a foil/grill (from an old cooker of mine) to grill stuff on an open fire. Refrigeration(or the slowing of food going off is more accurate) is a tricky one- bagging stuff up and putting it in a stream etc would work but then concern there is the rise/fall of the temp between paddling/camp. Was in Aldis/Lidls the other day and they had these "piece box" type things with "refrigeration gel inserts"(?). Think I'll pop up and see if they've any left, as these could be ideal mini meat fridges.
Try my cous cous recipe though- with some rocket salad etc you may be surprised- it's certainly not bland, and, as I've pointed out before, cous cous is far less demanding on gas supplies to cook than pasta or rice, far quicker therefore and is nutritionally almost identical...
"God tells me he can get me out of this mess, but he's pretty sure you're f****d..."

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Douglas Wilcox
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Post by Douglas Wilcox » Sat May 12, 2007 10:57 am

I am totally with Pelagic on this style fine dining in the outdoors.

Cornholio>
Bacon a week? Is that the dry cured stuff?

Yes that's the best stuff to get. Last year in the heat of July, Little's dry cure bacon(which they vacuum packed for me at the counter) lasted two weeks. It made wonderful tasty breakfasts. Also, when chopped up with a handful of dried Scotch broth mix, it made delicious home made soup in the pressure cooker in just a few minutes.

Absolutely no point in making yourself miserable when camping from a kayak.

Douglas

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Cornholio
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Post by Cornholio » Sat May 12, 2007 11:00 am

Dry cure it is then...bacon rolls in the morning can't be beat!
"God tells me he can get me out of this mess, but he's pretty sure you're f****d..."

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Pelagic
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Post by Pelagic » Sat May 12, 2007 1:37 pm

cous cous is far less demanding on gas supplies to cook than pasta or rice, far quicker therefore and is nutritionally almost identical...
To be honest I must try Cous Cous again, the last time was when I was climbing in the Verdon in France and two of us were living on 10 francs a day, cous cous and sardines, cous cous and peppers, etc. etc. so I do admit to swearing never to touch it again as long as I live! It tastes basically of whatever you put in in it and it does cook quickly. but so does easy cook rice and fresh pasta (fresh pasta tastes so much better than the dry stuff too!)
I will definately try the recipe though..........

To be honest it boils down to whether you regard food as fuel or fun, I am absolutely with Douglas on this, a main meal is a highlight of the day and the more effort and imagination you put into it the better, It can be quick and nutritious as well as being tasty. Half the fun is in the experimentation with fresh ingredients, the other half is watching your mates slobber!

As am doing now looking at Helens yummy looking toastie!
I just have to get me one of those...........and a pressure cooker too........

Phil

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Geoff Seddon
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Post by Geoff Seddon » Sun May 13, 2007 11:45 pm

And on the veg. side, which can be a nice accompaniment to any sort of meat, celery, sugar snap peas or mange touts, mini corn, carrots, onions will all last pretty much a week with little or no attention. Top tip carry a variety of herbs, the smell of these gently wafting on the evening air can drive someone, warming up their fifth packet macaroni cheese, quite delerious, which is fun.
Geoff

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runswick2000
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Post by runswick2000 » Mon May 14, 2007 8:34 am

I can't believe what I am reading! This is what I eat, rain or shine (unless there is a pub nearby). Sadly I live the life of a new man and cook every night of the week for my wonderful but hardworking wife.

A trip away in my kayak is pure escapism..............for me that can't involve any proper cooking. The only exception is anything edible that I can lift from the sea.

Of course I also take a bit of this to tickle the taste buds......
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geyrfugl
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Post by geyrfugl » Mon May 14, 2007 11:11 am

I can't better any suggestions for evening meals (indeed, hastily scribbling down details...) but I reckon you can't beat pancakes and maple syrup (and cafetiere coffee) for breakfasts.

I make up a pancake mix of the flour, sugar, salt and baking powder (I'm using an American recipe, no doubt you could use SR flour) in exactly the right amount for one day (needs 1 egg) in a small freezer bag. Inside that I put 1 oz butter wrapped in cling film (insulated by the flour mix, this very rarely melts). That bag goes into an old E45 tub, and a second one follows, a perfect fit. Three of those and half a dozen eggs in a robust container. One bottle of maple syrup also does about a week. You need milk, of course, fresh keeps 2-3 days if you buy small bottles so they aren't open for long (much better for coffee than dried). You can often resupply on milk, even in the smallest of shops in remoter bits of Scotland, but if not, pancakes work fine with dried.

For one person, four thick pancakes is a serious breakfast, for two of us, we add a few other snacks. I use a small steel omelette pan bought very cheaply at a hardware store. I wouldn't use an aluminium pan for frying on a stove - they're soon ruined. The steel one occasionally needs the bottom cleaned with an angle grinder, but the cooking surface stays properly conditioned as long as it is only washed with boiling water and detergent is left at home.

If an early or hungover start means you only have time for the cafetiere coffee and snacks at breakfast, pancakes make an excellent lunch instead. But be prepared to share or defend them from marauders !

Andy

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waltfos
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food for thought

Post by waltfos » Mon May 14, 2007 11:46 am

As ll sounding good

Greys pancakes are good but can but mix from CO-OP and keeps well and can make biscuits and scones with it too

Take some of Runswicks [this] i asume its elegancia, some dried fruit soake in this and then thrown into mix nex morning i bit of a hair of the dog you may say in solid form but yum

Cambells soup [condenced type] with rice couscous, noodles or pasta brightens it up but dont put in too much water

Forgot to say sinsbury's do croissants that are quickly het up over stove ie shelf to side and rotate and you have steaming sweat bread [not to be confused with sweatbreads] and tea or coffee great

All this is making me hungry of for lunch

tara

Keep shoogling

Walt

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woody
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Post by woody » Wed May 16, 2007 9:05 pm

Hey folks would you mind letting me know what kind of pressure cooker you are using and where it came from please?

Thanks
Woody
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Douglas Wilcox
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Post by Douglas Wilcox » Wed May 16, 2007 11:27 pm

Pressure cooker available here for £13.

Douglas

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geyrfugl
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Post by geyrfugl » Thu May 17, 2007 3:06 pm

Nice pressure cookers. Easy to use shopping site. Right up until it goes
off to validate your debit card, which it does via HSBC, whose web page tells me "Cardholder Authentication in Progress". Forever. Broken website depending on some custom bug in Internet Explorer, no doubt. That's the second organisation that's lost my business this way.

Anyone know of a working e-commerce site that sells these neat little Pressure Cookers ?

Andy

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Pelagic
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Post by Pelagic » Thu May 17, 2007 4:32 pm

It worked fine for me Andy, (I use Firefox as my browser) There was a pop up window from RBS, to confirm card details, do you have pop ups disabled?
Sorry if I am teaching my granny to suck eggs............
Speaking of food,

boeuf bourguignon with herby dumplings.........cant wait!

Phil

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geyrfugl
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Post by geyrfugl » Thu May 17, 2007 8:16 pm

[quote]There was a pop up window from RBS, to confirm card details, do you have pop ups disabled?[/quote]

Hmm, the javascript setting for opening new windows is "Smart". Probably not smart enough. I've changed it to "Ask", but I recall that this gets very irritating after a while.... Expect my session has timed out by now and I'll have to start again....

I do hate sites that try to make decisions for me and force my browser to try to outsmart them - 'cause software is never clever enough to get it right 100% of the time :-(

I'm using konqueror, 'cos I only have 2 Gb of memory (and jsut over a hundred browser windows open in five or six incarnations of the browser, some of them running on remote machines) and Firefox would just stiff the system with that amount of load... And I can't turn off the dreadful tabbed browsing feature. Hate it :-(

timber
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Post by timber » Thu May 17, 2007 11:05 pm

I've just returned from the most fantastic four days on the west coast and mull. I'll put up a trip report soon!! But we ate quite a varied diet but always freshly prepared.

I quite like the dried stuffed pasta you can get , mix it with pesto, pine nuts sun dried tomatoes and if you feel like it some olives and sheepscheese. Though usally the olives and sheep cheese gets consumed as a snack with the red wine!!!

Stir fries are good, as are curries. I also make a lovely pasta suace using a few freshly prepared veggies, veggie stock, tomatoe puree, italian herbs and sheeps cheese. Great with pasta and red wine!!

I've also been known to make fajitas. All of the above can easily be made on a MSR or trangia etc.

I love Sea Kayaking as the food is only really limited by you're imagination!

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