What should be in a paddlers First Aid kit?

Inland paddling
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Dave T
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What should be in a paddlers First Aid kit?

Post by Dave T » Wed Dec 20, 2006 2:50 pm

I had a look through mine for the first time in a while last night and realised it could do with a few additions to say the least.

What do you think paddlers should carry in a First aid kit for average river use?

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Helen H
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Post by Helen H » Wed Dec 20, 2006 2:55 pm

Triangular bandage (for head injury), melolin, crepe bandages, bivvy bag, light stick, gaffa tape, sugar or glucose gel.
The woods would be silent if no bird sang except those that sing best.

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Adrian Cooper
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Post by Adrian Cooper » Wed Dec 20, 2006 3:01 pm

If you buy a first aid kit from a shop, I often find you need to take stuff out rather than add to it. What you can use on the river is very limited. Strapping and dressings is about it. Something to stop bleeding and something to immobilise.

Oh, and some elastoplast.

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davidw
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Post by davidw » Wed Dec 20, 2006 3:02 pm

Items needed/used by groups I've paddled with in the last few weeks:

Something for mopping up blood
Painkiller/Anti-inflammatory drugs,
Steristrips,
Plasters (hypo-allergenic),
Anti-septic wipes,
A source of glucose,
Roll of electrical tape

Agent Nomad
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Post by Agent Nomad » Wed Dec 20, 2006 3:03 pm

CPR instruvtion card and a non return valve [looks like a plastic hankachief and stops the vomit/body fluids getting in your mouth]

Triagle bandage


Will finish from home latter

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Helen H
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Post by Helen H » Wed Dec 20, 2006 3:49 pm

Paul H3, an alternative to the type of face shield you are describing might be the pocket mask by laerdal.

www.laerdal.co.uk/

(Type "pocket mask" into the search. Sorry- my technical skills are very limited!)
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twopigs
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Post by twopigs » Wed Dec 20, 2006 3:55 pm

Pencil and waterproof paper to make notes - write out messages
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littlejohn
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Post by littlejohn » Wed Dec 20, 2006 4:00 pm

gloves

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Grumpy Fisherman
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Post by Grumpy Fisherman » Wed Dec 20, 2006 4:00 pm

mouse wrote:Paul H3, an alternative to the type of face shield you are describing might be the pocket mask by laerdal.

www.laerdal.co.uk/

(Type "pocket mask" into the search. Sorry- my technical skills are very limited!)
A lovely bit of kit, makes the whole process a little more palatable.

However, if size were an issue (expedition boating, etc), the Laerdal is quite bulky, while the sheet faceguards can be packed down to keyring size.

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newstylerocka
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River First Aid Kits

Post by newstylerocka » Wed Dec 20, 2006 4:20 pm

As a first aid provider and kayaker, i'd stay the following,

Gloves,
Safety Pins,
Triangluar Bandage x 2
Crepe Bandage x 2
Waterproof Plasters
Micropore (duct tape or electical tape will do the same job)
Sterile Dressings x 2
Small face shield
Steri Strips
Foil blanket but your bivi bag will do the same job,

This is a small basic list that should cater for most if not all of scenrios that should arise on a trip.

Its much better to make your own first aid kit rather than buying one, as perviously said you end up taking a lot of stuff out of a bought first aid kit.

I carry a little bit more than the above list and it all fits into a small drybag, same size as the ones that i put my sandwitches in.

Dale

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AndyK
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Post by AndyK » Wed Dec 20, 2006 5:03 pm

Keeping a few tampons in the first aid kit is vey handy as they are individually sealed they keep dry and a obviously great for absorbing fluids when ripped open. In addition, ripping them apart also gives you dry kindleing if you need to make an emergency fire.

Agent Nomad
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Post by Agent Nomad » Wed Dec 20, 2006 5:06 pm

Dale has just about covered all the bits I was going add

Here is the link for a face shield http://www.crestmedical.co.uk/product-catalogue.asp you need to down load the catalog and on page 3 of the pdf file 5 of the paper one there are 3 types the bule one has a CPR reminder on the back of itas I have one here and is the size of a credit card in a tear to open platic bag

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john smith
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Post by john smith » Wed Dec 20, 2006 5:08 pm

Try this thread for some useful ideas.

http://www.bcuwestmidlands.org.uk/phpBB ... .php?t=584

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ol
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Post by ol » Wed Dec 20, 2006 6:51 pm

The best thing to carry, would be someone in the group who has the slightest clue what they are doing in that situation I would have thought.

I did a first aid course for work and it was very bad, still wouldn't rerally have much of a clue what to do in certain situations beyond my own common sense.

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James Hartley
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Post by James Hartley » Wed Dec 20, 2006 7:56 pm

As Ol has already hinted at, carry nothing that you don't know how to use!

However, one very useful piece of kit that no one has yet mentioned is superglue, for use on small cuts and nicks
The more apparently complex an act, the more vital it is to search until you find its inner simplicity
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James Hartley
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Post by James Hartley » Wed Dec 20, 2006 7:59 pm

Oh and a china graph pencil, you can turn your boat over and use it to write on, you can jot down a full list, and times of when things where done, or the situation changes. Admittedly taking the boat with you when you need the info written on it may be problematic.

I also carry airways and a small suction pump to help maintain an airway, but this is not for everyone
The more apparently complex an act, the more vital it is to search until you find its inner simplicity
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twopigs
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Post by twopigs » Wed Dec 20, 2006 8:13 pm

James Hartley wrote: However, one very useful piece of kit that no one has yet mentioned is superglue, for use on small cuts and nicks
If I remember rightly superglue was developed to act as an emergency field dressing in Vietnam - plugging scrapnel wounds - stops the wounded man bleeding to death before he can be heli-vacced to a field hospital. Gruesome!
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Helen H
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Post by Helen H » Wed Dec 20, 2006 8:14 pm

If you write on the gloves, they can simply be sent with the casualty to hospital if needed.
The woods would be silent if no bird sang except those that sing best.

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john smith
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Post by john smith » Wed Dec 20, 2006 8:34 pm

mouse wrote:If you write on the gloves, they can simply be sent with the casualty to hospital if needed.
Sorry Mouse, but they will be binned by accident, long before anyone looks at them.

I know from bitter experience, I used to write reams on my gloves, till I kept throwing my notes away.

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Helen H
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Post by Helen H » Wed Dec 20, 2006 8:40 pm

I retract! Don't write on your gloves! Write on the casualty?
The woods would be silent if no bird sang except those that sing best.

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john smith
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Post by john smith » Wed Dec 20, 2006 8:42 pm

twopigs wrote:
James Hartley wrote: However, one very useful piece of kit that no one has yet mentioned is superglue, for use on small cuts and nicks
If I remember rightly superglue was developed to act as an emergency field dressing in Vietnam - plugging scrapnel wounds - stops the wounded man bleeding to death before he can be heli-vacced to a field hospital. Gruesome!
It does work, but remember if you don`t know exactly what your doing, you can leave a large scar if the wound isn`t aligned before closure. Best to stick a bandage on and leave it to the A&E.

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Big Henry
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Post by Big Henry » Wed Dec 20, 2006 8:49 pm

How about a diver's slate (a hard plastic card and pencil) which works underwater? Or use a permanent marker and (as mouse said...) write on the casualty.

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Post by husky » Wed Dec 20, 2006 9:51 pm

You should be very careful using or taking any pain killers, most pain killers thin the blood and will promote the bleed
Also you have some people suffer from blood disorders such as ITP ect, administration of pain killers could cause them serious problems although the likely hood of the some one paddling with chronic ITP or similar Would be small as they are aware of the risks of haemorrhaging.

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Helen H
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Post by Helen H » Wed Dec 20, 2006 10:20 pm

If someone had chronic ITP, might they be wearing a medic alert or are these just for particular conditions?
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heybaz
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Post by heybaz » Wed Dec 20, 2006 10:37 pm

If records scrawled on a soggy sandwich wrapper, or the bottom of a boat, are going to be needed for any kind of reference, pop a couple of shots of them (or anything else of import) with a digital camera and send it with the casualty? Less crucial, I've found this invaluable when travelling for things like bus / train timetables in station concourses....

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Post by RichardCree » Wed Dec 20, 2006 10:44 pm

When using superglue to fix cuts, you first have to wait for the bleeding to stop, then clean the edges then glue.

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Ed Lefley
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Post by Ed Lefley » Wed Dec 20, 2006 11:00 pm

My FAK contains:
Large Ambulance Dressings x 3
Medium Ambulance Dressings x 3
Melolin Pads (quite a few)
Plaster (asst sizes)
Steri Strips
Permanent Marker Pen
2 x 20p pieces
triangular bandage
electrical tape (duck tape is in my repair kit and on my paddles for quick fixes)
micropore
Loads of medi wipes
2 prs Gloves

Everything is grouped together in plastic bags inside my FAK so that you can open it and drip on it without getting things wet.

I did a L3 assessment and got told that my FAK was missing some bits, mainly the dressings... so I added a whole load.

I too believe in writing on the casualty any notes that may be needed, it means that it would have to be a complete monkey to loose them!!

I've been thinking about adding some spray elastoplast to it, as I've been using that on myself when i get skin splits from working with climbing ropes, but it isn't actually that good in wet conditions, although it does stop bleeding on contact pretty much I've found. The biggest problem with is the cost, £7ish a pot.

YvonneB
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Blisters

Post by YvonneB » Wed Dec 20, 2006 11:09 pm

A minor thing but if you get blisters on the side of your thumb, I found that the self- sticking crepe support bandage you can get from
Boots now works a treat. It has a latex coating and sticks to itself. You have to put it on when your hands are clean and dry, but once on I found it lasted a whole day's sea paddling, unlike elastoplast. Not cheap but the pain relief is worth it.

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Dave T
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Post by Dave T » Wed Dec 20, 2006 11:23 pm

Ed Lefley wrote: 2 x 20p pieces
Why?

heybaz
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Post by heybaz » Wed Dec 20, 2006 11:25 pm

40p is better than nothing...

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