Lundy Trip^

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Ian Beith
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Lundy Trip^

Post by Ian Beith » Tue May 02, 2006 2:31 pm

My photos from the Lundy trip are here:

http://www.seakayaking.org.uk/gallery/m ... temId=1048

Fantastic weekend, would highly recommend Lundy to anyone.

Things didn’t look like they were going to get off to a good start but once we were past the tidal race off Morte Point the sea state was fine and the sun came out.
Arrived Lundy at around 1530 making it a 5hr crossing. The last hour was a bit of a slog into the wind.

Sunday
Quiet walk round the island interrupted by the arrival of 250 bird watchers. Weather wasn’t looking good for the return journey so we managed to arrange ferries for half the group on Sunday and the rest on Monday. Zoe Newsam and Mark Gawler decided to go for the paddle on Sunday. Myself Mark R, Dave Thomas and Steve Beith circumnavigated the island.
Dave Thomas writes - The round the Island trip was great - hardly any swell on the W side, a bit of a push getting round the SW corner against the developing flood (another 30 minutes later and it may not have 'gone'!) and a fairly easy run round the NW corner - (well almost round - a 'chicken chute' channel inside the final rock outcrop cut the corner slightly) - despite some quite big white stuff in the race further out. Plenty of seals.

Monday
After a very rough nights sleep, heavy rain and wind we woke to sunshine but still quite breezy. Walked up to North Light in the Morning then after lunch at the Tavern we wondered up to Battery Point. Loaded the boats at 1630 and sailed home, well Bideford, then taxi to Lee Bay (ouch) and THEN home.

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Lord Summerisle
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Post by Lord Summerisle » Tue May 02, 2006 8:44 pm

I like the sunset pictures best.
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Chas C
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Post by Chas C » Tue May 02, 2006 9:20 pm

I was in the pub and missed those "sun set photo's" being taken.

Trip was great apart from the mishaps, leaking boat, wet kit, broken tent poles which added to the fun.

Beer and pub food was very good and a very reasonable price considering where its had to come from.

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Mark R
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Post by Mark R » Tue May 02, 2006 9:27 pm

Lundy, most definitely working its way up my list of favourite places.

Eleven of us made the crossing on Saturday, which involved fairly nasty conditions...large breaking tide races at the start, mild weather in the middle, but then strong headwinds whipped up and turned the last hour into nearly two hours...just what you need with a large tired and mixed group, 18 miles offshore. I didn't enjoy the crossing much this time, only good bit was the dolphin who cruised among us.

The forecast on Sunday morning was not good...Force 5 or 6 winds due that afternoon or evening, with more lousy weather into the next day. This meant that paddling back with the whole group was not going to be a viable option. We split...some decided to get back to the mainland on the ferry that night (Island Manager couldn't have been more helpful), some decided to paddle back early to try and beat the wind (they joined another group who were good enough to invite them, and made it back fine)...

...and the rest of us decided to stay on Lundy and loaf around. We made the paddle around the island which was awesome, seals absolutely everywhere and some amazing tunnels and caves to explore.

On Monday (after a windy night which destroyed one tent in the campsite), the sea was fairly lumpy and I couldn't persuade anyone to come for a potter along the sheltered side...instead we loafed some more, walked around the island, drank Lundy beer and finally sailed home on the ferry.

Splendid, good effort all.


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Mike Marshall
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Lundy Trip

Post by Mike Marshall » Tue May 02, 2006 9:35 pm

Nice trip all, and some great photos.
Now Lundy is added firmly to my list!!

MikeM

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Zoe Newsam
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Post by Zoe Newsam » Tue May 02, 2006 9:55 pm

I'd definitely echo Mark R's sentiments: Lundy is awesome. The trip there, however, was really tough this time. Last summer we had a lovely, relaxed crossing; this year the head wind for the last few miles after we'd lost all but the smallest tidal assistance turned it into sheer purgatory, with an island ahead that never seemed to get any closer.

I was gutted to miss the paddle round the island, but as we hadn't managed the trip back last year, Mark G & I really wanted to paddle the return journey. We decided that the weather looked like holding (the forecast said 'becoming SW 5 or 6 overnight) long enough for the crossing, and another group of paddlers (who we'd coincidentally met & paddled with 2 weeks ago on a NWSK trip) were setting off with the same plan so we decided to hook up with them.

Visibility was pretty dreadful- we finally saw land when we were about 5 miles off- and when we did, we discovered we'd rather overcooked the ferry angle and were much further South than we'd thought. There is something rather special, though, about being 10 miles offshore in a Sea Kayak with no sight of land in any direction! We corrected (paddling 3 miles further than planned) around the time the wind started to pick up, and eventually came to the race at Morte Point, which even with wind and tide in the same direction was pretty impressive!

All in all, though this is definitely not a trip to be taken lightly, I'd recommend it- I'll certainly be going back. Lundy's a magical place.

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Post by Helen M » Tue May 02, 2006 10:07 pm

If Lundy is a magical place why is Heather thinking about diving head first off the cliff?

Or am I missing something?

Seriously - looks a stunning place - in good weather! Think that is the key. St Abbs will be good - in decent weather and am looking forward to going back.

Glad everyone enjoyed the trip.

H - x

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Mark R
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Post by Mark R » Tue May 02, 2006 10:30 pm

zoenewsam wrote:(the forecast said 'becoming SW 5 or 6 overnight)
The Inshore Waters and Inshore Forecasts certainly did not say 'overnight', although I think someone from the Coastguard might have ventured the opinion that the bad weather would most likely arrive then.

I'm glad you both got back safely, as we were sure you would...we had calm seas for the paddle around the island, but the cloud had descended and we couldn't see the tops of the cliffs. At 5 pm the Coastguard were reporting Force 5 at the Mumbles already. By dusk the rain had arrived, the tents were flapping...we discovered that the only solution was to drink lots of Lundy Experience.
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Graham Bland
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Lundy

Post by Graham Bland » Wed May 03, 2006 7:40 am

I was in the pub and missed those "sun set photo's" being taken.
Be honest Chas - we walked to the wrong lighthouse and looked East!

A great weekend amongst good company on a beautiful island. Sad to have missed the 'around the island paddle' but a good excuse to return.

Thanks for organising the trip Mark

Graham

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Post by Mark Gawler » Wed May 03, 2006 8:20 am

A very enjoyable weekend, the trip knocked up a couple of firsts for me, my first open crossing and first time paddling with a loaded boat. The crossing gave a different perspective on the sea, I’m no stranger to the sea as I grew up sailing with my parents, who thought nothing of nipping to Guernsey to stock up on duty free and visiting my uncle, but being stuck in the seat for five hours added a little to the exposure.

I leant quite a few things on the trip about group synergy, navigation[1], boat packing / unpacking[2]. There’s lots I would do differently, but I think all made the correct decision for them about the return crossing. I have a great deal of respect for those who can say no and catch the Ferry. As for Zoë and myself we knew we had the ability and were prepared to turn back in the first 30 minutes if the conditions looked to bad.

As it turned out we packed the boats in sunshine, there was a little drizzle as we launched, which ensured we weren’t under dressed for the crossing. After an hour of paddling the wind had died and some were removing there cags, these conditions lasted for the next couple of hours. In the final hour or two the wind picked up and the food tide reached its peak, which made the race at Mort Point fun to have a quick surf on!

I was really grateful to the Taunton paddlers for inviting to tag along with them; I would have been less happy about paddling as a two and may well have not committed to the crossing.

On the equipment side I will be buying a VHF radio, these things seem to be a little fickle, so having more in the group can only be a good thing. As we set off Mark attempted to call us Zoe’s VHF did not receive the call.

MarkG


[1] Mark recons we came back via Cornwall after seeing the GPS track, I’m just glad Mark teaches History not Geography ;-). OK we came close to surfing at Croyde, but there was no danger of reaching Cornwall.

[2] Remember to unpack your tent poles from behind the skeg box before slogging up the hill to the campsite, and while you’re about it you should check the bow for the themorest!

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Mark R
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Post by Mark R » Wed May 03, 2006 8:35 am

Mark Gawler wrote:I will be buying a VHF radio, these things seem to be a little fickle
I'll be testing mine before the next trip - despite two days on charge, I discovered two miles into the outward leg that it wasn't working.
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runswick2000
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Post by runswick2000 » Wed May 03, 2006 12:53 pm

Mark Gawler wrote:I leant quite a few things on the trip
So did I. Top of the list of things to remember is, if you sit next to someone chatty on the ferry, be friendly back despite your tiredness. She ended up giving our two drivers a lift back to Lee bay (saving a fairly hefty taxi fair).

Great trip, sad to miss the trip trip around the island.
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Hudman
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Post by Hudman » Wed May 03, 2006 2:43 pm

Out of interest, how much did the ferry cost you carrying the boats? I've heard it is up to the discression of the ferry company and can be super expensive?

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Zoe Newsam
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Post by Zoe Newsam » Wed May 03, 2006 2:45 pm

MarkR wrote:
Mark Gawler wrote:I will be buying a VHF radio, these things seem to be a little fickle
I'll be testing mine before the next trip - despite two days on charge, I discovered two miles into the outward leg that it wasn't working.
Yes, mine appeared to be on less than its' best behaviour, too. (MarkR, I think ours are the same type aren't they? Silva S12?) It worked fine on the outward crossing- small swell only, and I listened to the MSIB without interference. On the return journey, however, I heard Mark call on other people's handsets but not my own, and when I tried to reply he obviously couldn't hear me. The forecast was unreadable, too. I do carry it on my deck though, and the swell was larger than the previous day, but others seemed to be receiving fine.

Weird.

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stripper
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Post by stripper » Wed May 03, 2006 2:47 pm

'OK we came close to surfing at Croyde'

Our return GPS track looks interesting!! Our outward track was very similar to yours and taking 5hrs from Ilfracombe, so we assumed (always dangerous) to reverse timings and bearing for the return,also suggested on the Trips page. As the track shows this is defineatly not the case. We didn't seem to get much of a push from the tide at all which is strange considering we were on springs. After correcting our mistake all was well and only half an hour longer than outward journey. Surfing with the small chop pushed us on nicely to Morte Point and the finish albeit slightly tired bunnies. Oops , probably shouldn't mention bunnies as the peace process between the warring rabbit factions on the island are obviously failing and they're taking no prisoners!! Either that or the island warden is from Portland .

Clive
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Ian Beith
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Post by Ian Beith » Wed May 03, 2006 2:48 pm

Hudster wrote:Out of interest, how much did the ferry cost you carrying the boats? I've heard it is up to the discression of the ferry company and can be super expensive?
They charged us £40 each which was quite reasonable. A day return ticket is £29 (they don't do singles!)
I think Mark paid more than that last time.

Another £60 for the taxi back to the cars mind.

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Zoe Newsam
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Post by Zoe Newsam » Wed May 03, 2006 3:06 pm

stripper wrote:Our return GPS track looks interesting!!We didn't seem to get much of a push from the tide at all which is strange considering we were on springs.
Clive
Somerset Sea Monkeys
Aha, identity reavealed!!

Yes indeed- very odd. We set off only just before LW local (1436 BST) and I guess we all thought we'd pick up tidal assistance fairly quickly given that it was springs, and a big one at that- but it didn't seem to kick in at all for the first couple of hours.

I suppose what we ended up having to do was the classic 'handrail' navigation technique: head to the right/ left of your desired point, then when you hit a feature (or in our case, when you sight land) you know which way to turn.

It was a pleasure to paddle with you & the rest of the Taunton gang, Clive- even if you did manage to hold up a solid 4-knots paddling speed for 5 hours! It's been a long time since I've sat at the back of a group for an entire trip!! ;0) Hope to see you all again sometime.

Zoe

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Post by runswick2000 » Wed May 03, 2006 3:47 pm

Ian Beith wrote:Another £60 for the taxi back to the cars mind.
You should have found a nice girl to chat up on the ferry! Can't get cheaper than free.....
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Post by Dave Thomas » Wed May 03, 2006 3:57 pm

zoenewsam wrote:We set off only just before LW local (1436 BST)
From the chart (and I think the tidal stream atlas in the almanac as well), the flood at Morte Point starts between 5 and 6 hours after HW Avonmouth (ie betweeen 1443 and 1543 BST on Sunday). On the basis of tide alone, I would have been inclined to depart perhaps an hour later than you did, to avoid too much paddling without a 'push' from the tide - though the deteriorating weather militated against that, of course. Even so, it is surprising that you didn't appear to pick up much assistance for at least a couple of hours. Maybe the stream turns later well out in the sound - perhaps there is some sort of eddy effect at the N end of Bideford Bay which causes an earlier turn near Morte Point?

There again, the local tidal stream chart didn't predict the distinct counter-current we experienced as we approached Lundy on the Saturday. Just shows that , when your speed through the water is approximately the same as the stream, the most accurate formal navigation calculations need to be heavily modified by 'seat of pants' and visual inputs to account for local and time-variable effects!

Did you not observe the deviation on the GPS as you crossed, Mark - you clearly had it running?

Dave Thomas

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Zoe Newsam
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Post by Zoe Newsam » Wed May 03, 2006 4:05 pm

Dave Thomas wrote: the distinct counter-current we experienced as we approached Lundy on the Saturday
There's a technical name for that- it's called a Headwind! ;0)

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Post by Dave Thomas » Wed May 03, 2006 4:18 pm

I know I was paddling about 50m away from you, but there wasn't enough wind where I was to be having that dramatic an effect on speed in the area I'm talking about (a stretch of a few hundred metres a few hundred metres out from the point on Rat Island(?)).

And to be honest, it wasn't a full-on head wind anyhow, through most of that last hour or more. I reckon the slowness of that period was down to a combination of loss of 'push' as the stream fell off, general tiredness and the unsetling effect on paddling rhythm of the 'on-the-beam' component of the wind, as much as to the 'on the nose' component of wind.

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Mark R
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Post by Mark R » Wed May 03, 2006 6:36 pm

Dave Thomas wrote:Did you not observe the deviation on the GPS as you crossed, Mark - you clearly had it running?
No, I used the GPS only to judge our speed and our distance to the target.

The GPS track shows pretty much what you'd expect...maintaining the same heading for the majority of the trip, curved south of the Morte Point/ Lundy line through the strongest hours of the tide, and then curved back onto it at the end.
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Mark R
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Post by Mark R » Wed May 03, 2006 6:50 pm

Graham's pics and report.
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Mark R
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Post by Mark R » Wed May 03, 2006 6:58 pm

Image

Where did you spot these chaps, Graham? I didn't see any gannets.
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Ian Beith
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Post by Ian Beith » Wed May 03, 2006 7:22 pm

MarkR wrote:Graham's pics and report.
Slightly confusing that the Track goes Right to Left but the Graph goes Left to Right.
Quite interesting though.

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Post by Dave Thomas » Wed May 03, 2006 9:11 pm

MarkR wrote:[No, I used the GPS only to judge our speed and our distance to the target.
Sorry - wrong Mark! I meant Mark Gawler, on the return trip.

Dave Thomas

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Graham Bland
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Post by Graham Bland » Thu May 04, 2006 6:28 am

Where did you spot these chaps, Graham? I didn't see any gannets
The photo was taken from the back of the ferry Sunday evening on it's island circuit - but I had seen a couple of Gannets earlier that day half way along the East Coast. There was also a Peregrine perched on the cliffs at the same spot
G

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Chas C
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Re: Lundy

Post by Chas C » Thu May 04, 2006 12:13 pm

Chas said - I was in the pub and missed those "sun set photo's" being taken.

Graham said - Be honest Chas - we walked to the wrong lighthouse and looked East!
Well we fell out of the pub looked into the sky and only saw one light house - when we got there we could not see the sun set as it was on the other side of the Island. So then had to slog over to the other side - to the correct but previously unseen lighthouse, but were too late.

Next time its out of the pub and turn right (or was it left !!)

Chas

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Mark R
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Post by Mark R » Thu May 25, 2006 8:56 pm

Image


Ten miles offshore.


What has Chas got on his back deck? Suggestions, please.
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Jim
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Post by Jim » Thu May 25, 2006 11:18 pm

Looks like a wrapped christmas tree to me, probably useful for bartering I doubt if they grow indigenously over there?

JIM

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