Latex seals

Inland paddling
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Turboboy
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Latex seals

Post by Turboboy » Sun Feb 26, 2006 7:25 pm

Recently the latex seals on my cag have become sticky. Does this mean they are on their way out. If so is there anything i can do to make them last longer.

Cheers James

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RichA
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Post by RichA » Sun Feb 26, 2006 7:32 pm

Yes, they will probably tear soon. There's a product called Seal Saver available in most diving shops etc/online, but I don't know if it works. I'm sure somebody can comment on it...

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davebrads
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Re: sealsaver

Post by davebrads » Sun Feb 26, 2006 7:54 pm

Sealsaver certainly makes the rubber more slippy. I do use it on an intermittent basis, but I can't be sure that it has any beneficial effect, as there appears to be quite a variation in the quality of the latex used by different manufacturers, so I may just be lucky in having good quality latex seals in the first place. Maybe it works because the seals are more slippy, and this reduces the stress when you are putting on or removing the cag.

I had seals replaced by the rubberman on an old Wildwater cag (which didn't have good quality seals), and his seals seem to be of decent quality. I think the cost is £25 for the neck, and £25 for the cuffs, but I may be wrong

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Ryan Clements
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Post by Ryan Clements » Sun Feb 26, 2006 8:13 pm

Apparently, the thing that makes them go sticky is the grease from your skin slowly penetrating the latex and acting as a kind of solvent. A neat trick which I was told of is to wash your seals with normal soap after use; this removes the grease and stops them going sticky. If you can be bothered to do this and hide the seals from UV they will last for years. It really does work! Or so I'm told- my kit is still in a bag wet from a paddling trip last week.

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MikeB
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Post by MikeB » Sun Feb 26, 2006 8:32 pm

Sticky seals = dying seals I'm afraid. Sealsaver helps protect seals from degrading, but wont save yours I fear.

Check the Sea Site / Alamanc / DIY, Repairs etc page where there are some links to Rubberman and others for replacement options.

Mike.

Turboboy
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So they are on their way out

Post by Turboboy » Sun Feb 26, 2006 8:43 pm

Cheers guys so in summary they are on their way out and when they do go i should send them off to rubberman.

Cheers James

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tizereyes
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Post by tizereyes » Sun Feb 26, 2006 8:51 pm

I've been told that talcum power can also be used a seal saver. Never tried it myself tho.

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ol
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Post by ol » Sun Feb 26, 2006 9:13 pm

I've been told (by a man in a long raincoat) that KY jelly is an alternative for Seal Saver.

So, if you happen to have any lying around the house, then this can also be used in its place.

I believe, that it may be formulated so that it does no harm to rubber, such as that which is used in neck/wrist seals and in Johnson-jackets.
OL

CaileanMac
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Post by CaileanMac » Mon Feb 27, 2006 12:43 am

TurboBoy,

Do you dry your cag in a really warm drying room/shed? If so latex doesn't like excessive heat regularly, which may have contributed to your seals demise.

Rubberman - A+++++ service. Very quick and reasonable price.

CaileanMac

muirs
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Post by muirs » Mon Feb 27, 2006 9:43 am

Hey James :) long time no see...
The seals on my cag have been on the way out for a while, but as someone said, putting talc on them after I dry my cag, before putting it away seems to be doing the trick. They started getting sticky last.... June(?) and are still stuggling along. Just make sure it's unperfumed talc.
Finally got a new job, and the cash for a new cag recently, and now I'm having to wait months for the shop to get it in in my size!
Muireann

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Jim
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Post by Jim » Mon Feb 27, 2006 11:06 am

The point regarding using seal saver, or 303 (UV barrier), or KY or any other solution, is that you needed to use it years ago to prevent the seals going like that!

If you don't want to be without your cag for the time it takes to post it away and get it fixed you can get good DIY kits (with glue and instructions) from Trident

JIM

PENDLETA
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Post by PENDLETA » Mon Feb 27, 2006 3:19 pm

Top tips from the diving world.

As most people seem to have a little complex about the idea of buying KY, baby lotion is a good alternative.

It never seems to have damaged latex or neoprene seals on my drysuit, though for some unknown reason i've never got round to taking it boating.

It's also immeasurably better than talcum powder at taking the stress off the seals when you're putting them on and tends to keep them quite slidey when you're removing as well.
Happy Paddling

Andy Pendleton

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ol
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Post by ol » Mon Feb 27, 2006 6:47 pm

PENDLETA wrote: As most people seem to have a little complex about the idea of buying KY, baby lotion is a good alternative.
Yes, and if you also feel a little uncomfortable about buying that alone at the chemist, simply buy a bumper pack of Pampers, a pack of Kandoo wipes and a breast pump with it. They'll never suspect a thing, so I'm told....
OL

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MikeB
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Post by MikeB » Mon Feb 27, 2006 7:02 pm

Ozone - as produced by electric motors - doesnt do seals much good either. So, if your kit is stored/dryed in an area with electric motors, that is also a seal killer.

Mike.

Dave Thomas
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Post by Dave Thomas » Mon Feb 27, 2006 7:18 pm

MikeB wrote:Ozone - as produced by electric motors - doesnt do seals much good either. So, if your kit is stored/dryed in an area with electric motors, that is also a seal killer.
ie all those 'great' drying rooms with dehumidifiers rather than heaters!

Dave Thomas

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tizereyes
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Post by tizereyes » Mon Feb 27, 2006 10:35 pm

ol wrote:
PENDLETA wrote: As most people seem to have a little complex about the idea of buying KY, baby lotion is a good alternative.
Yes, and if you also feel a little uncomfortable about buying that alone at the chemist, simply buy a bumper pack of Pampers, a pack of Kandoo wipes and a breast pump with it. They'll never suspect a thing, so I'm told....
OL
Ol, for some reason I'm left with a most disturbing image
I'm sure it'll keep me smiling all the way into next week

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MadHatter
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Post by MadHatter » Tue Feb 28, 2006 1:13 am

KY works well. I swear by it, the rest of the club think i'm upto something kinky when i get it out. But i have never had those rashes that make you look like you've tried to hang yourself, and as far as i know all the seals on my kayaking and diving kit are sweet.

As a professional diver we tend to wash the seals on our dry suits then lightly talc them for storage (if you are not using them for more than a day or 2) this means that they dont stick together. Then break out the KY for putting them on. Makes it easier to put on and means you can adjust things without putting too much strain on the latex.

Turboboy
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Vasaline

Post by Turboboy » Tue Feb 28, 2006 8:59 pm

Does vasaline work in the same way as ky?

Would this be suitable?

Cheers James

MattD
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Post by MattD » Tue Feb 28, 2006 9:37 pm

I was led to believe that hydrocarbons of any form would not be to beneficial to latex rubbers. I'm not about to test it on any of my kit, but for sure I was warned of this by Laurent Vales (the Mad French Formulations Chemist and all 'round good egg).

Stick to the water-based lubes, if you really must use any. I've never found the need, but whatever tickles your fancy.

Matt
NB: Laurent was formulating a product called "PhysioSport Anti-Friction Cream" (or the like) for UniLever back in the day. Basically, Vaseline with Tea-Tree oil in it. Works darned well on Surfers neck in post-paddle applications. Not seen any on the shelves for a while but my tube is still going strong after about 5 years...
Take nothing but pictures. Leave nothing but footprints. Kill nothing but time.

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RichA
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Post by RichA » Tue Feb 28, 2006 11:28 pm

Don't use vaseline, for the same reason you shouldn't use it on latex condoms. The reason KY is used is that it doesn't break down the latex in the same way that vaseline would. Latex seals on a cag, hence use KY.

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