LENDAL PADLOCK

Inland paddling
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lp_myles
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LENDAL PADLOCK

Post by lp_myles » Wed Jan 11, 2006 7:46 pm

Has anyone paddled with a Lendal padlock? what are they like compared to a split paddle/normal paddle.

what i mean is can you tell that they are a set of splits when you paddle them, like most splits do they wobble and vibrate?

all i'm wondering is are they any good, and what peoples opinions are.

cheers
lee

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James Hartley
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Post by James Hartley » Wed Jan 11, 2006 7:52 pm

A good solid option. Definatly better than most (if not all) other readily available options. Solid, no play or movement in them.
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Dave @ TRC
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Post by Dave @ TRC » Wed Jan 11, 2006 8:03 pm

And adamsite cheaper than replacing a full paddle. You can just replace the part that's broken. That's if you break it.




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MikeB
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Post by MikeB » Wed Jan 11, 2006 8:04 pm

Superb system. Totally solid.

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Jim
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Post by Jim » Wed Jan 11, 2006 9:08 pm

Here I go again ;-)

I have been using the system since 2001 when I got a set to go to California for 2 weeks of fairly serious boating. Since then I've used that set again in California, in Washington (inc. Idaho and Oregon) and in the Grand canyon. I also used them as my every day paddles in Scotland for a while because my werners had worn down and were utterly useless, and I generally make them up as 2 piece splits to carry on the rear of my sea kayak too.

When assembled and tightened you cannot feel any difference compared to a one piece paddle.

Lendal pay attention to detail and have reinforced all the connection areas. The button is replaceable if you wreck one, and is cleanable so you shouldn't ever totally clog it with sand and be unable to use it. The key is a standard allen key with a fancy moulding on, so you can replace it anywhere in the world if you manage to lose or break it, and can quite easily get spares to take with you if you are clumsy.

Lendal can supply any of their paddles in a paddlok configuration, not just the emergency paddle which most shops stock. I have one of these for a spare on trips abroad but my main paddle is Carbon Nylon Kinetic xti blades on a 4 piece split HPS shaft - tough, fairly light and powerful. I have broken a couple of bits, the main reason always turns out to be that I wussed out of tightening them enough, or failed to retighten them when they slipped after a few hours of use - in such a situation the button does not hold on as well as a conventional button and the joint can start to slip apart and then bang, you snap a bit. It has been easy enough to swap parts with my emergency paddle on the river, and get replacement bits on my return home and I really don't worry about it.

If you are travelling and want something that is easy to take with you and not vulnerable in transit, then paddlok is the only way to go. Lendal even make a nice little bag which will hold 2 sets broken down and a few other odds and ends (my dry clothes usually). You can stash them inside your boat when flying and the baggage handlers can't break them, or put the bag inside a bigger holdall.

Go to a shop and ask if they have any, most have the emergency paddle (cheap shaft, heavy plastic blades, but the same joints) and should let you assemble it in the shop and see how it feels. When you are convinced choose the blade and shaft combination that suit you and ask the shop if they can get them for you, if they won't find a different shop (Des Mes I'm pretty sure will handle custom orders) or if you can't find a shop contact Lendal directly - it's not the ideal solution for them but they understand it can be hard to find shops who will order custom configurations and are usually quite accommodating.

JIM

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Chas C
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Post by Chas C » Wed Jan 11, 2006 9:33 pm

Well I'll keep it short then - Jim !!

As Jim said in not so many words - they are great paddles.

I have a 4 way set that are both left and right handed, bought for my son (who is kack right handed) but also used as spares by me when he's not paddling. Also used when travelling abroad, never had any issues.

Fast Pat
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Post by Fast Pat » Wed Jan 11, 2006 11:28 pm

The best system in the world.

For sea kayaking i have a set of 4 way kninetic wings on a straight shat as my main paddle, i also have kinetic tourers as my spare on a cranked - so the ultimate combinations. As a 4 way split it also means that if i break a blade the cost of change is cheap. Also have a 2 way split set of Mystics on a varilok for surfing - if i ever paddle a river again in a kayak (ie if tthe fishermen let me) then i'd happily use them.

4 ways are great for traveling as well.

Jim (as bloody ever!) has summed it up.

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TomW
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Post by TomW » Thu Jan 12, 2006 12:35 am

The actual Padlock system is great for all the reasons mentioned above.

I think I'm the odd one out here though in that I don't like the Lendal emergency paddle I own. It's heavy and has a huge amount of flex in it.

(It's also way longer than my normal paddle and set at a different angle. This is something I can sort out by buying a new section when I've got time. Some of my friends have had to use it 'in anger' and were just as displeased.)

It is however better than not having a spare at all and it is reasonably priced. Personally, when I get round to replacing it I'll probably go for the 4 piece Werner trip paddle (only £20 more) or something custom built.

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tomhollis
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Post by tomhollis » Thu Jan 12, 2006 10:24 am

If you don't like the feather you can just drill another hole. Our club blades have left and right handed holes.

I guess if you don't like lendal paddles then you aren't going to like their splits, but in terms of the padlock system itself, it is great as so many have said, like paddling with a normal set of blades.

Tom

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Jim
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Post by Jim » Thu Jan 12, 2006 12:55 pm

TomW wrote:The actual Padlock system is great for all the reasons mentioned above.

I think I'm the odd one out here though in that I don't like the Lendal emergency paddle I own. It's heavy and has a huge amount of flex in it.
No no, not all. The emergency paddle is very much the lowest of low spec (mine actually has mania assymetric blades on, the normal one is mania symetric I think - same weight and construction), and I wouldn't be at all surprised to hear people saying they hate it - I have only ever used mine in anger once and didn't like it.

It is an adequate solution for something to carry for an emergency, if the paddle is for travel use you really must go for a custom setup like Pat and I - choose the type of blade and shaft with the feel you want. When I say custom, Lendal do list the options with every paddle type so they are only semi-custom, it's just that with so many options shops don't like stocking the full range so will order them in specially as needed.

I always try and steer people away from the "emergency paddle" or the lendals that 'the shop' has in stock because most of the time they stock the heavy nylon ones on flexi glass shafts that are great for clubs and beginners (being cheap) but not what discerning paddlers are looking for.

JIM

Fast Pat
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Post by Fast Pat » Thu Jan 12, 2006 1:05 pm

TomW wrote:The actual Padlock system is great for all the reasons mentioned above.

I think I'm the odd one out here though in that I don't like the Lendal emergency paddle I own. It's heavy and has a huge amount of flex in it.

(It's also way longer than my normal paddle and set at a different angle. This is something I can sort out by buying a new section when I've got time. Some of my friends have had to use it 'in anger' and were just as displeased.)

It is however better than not having a spare at all and it is reasonably priced. Personally, when I get round to replacing it I'll probably go for the 4 piece Werner trip paddle (only £20 more) or something custom built.
Don't confuse the emergancy paddle with a 4 part padlok.

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Ed Lefley
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Post by Ed Lefley » Thu Jan 12, 2006 1:13 pm

OK I've been watching this thread for a while now as I need to sort out a set out of splits for myself to have in the back of my Hoss.

If people are saying that the lendal padlocks are the way to go, what is the ultimate specification for them? I want a combination of small size (4 way split) and sensible cost.

Any ideas?


Ed

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tomhollis
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Post by tomhollis » Thu Jan 12, 2006 1:32 pm

You pay for the quality of paddle really, they range from the mania which are he basic blade through the xti which is a better blade but still nylon(they are just over £100) and I guess you can even get the carbon ones, but I don't know anyone who bothers with carbon splits

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Ed Lefley
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Post by Ed Lefley » Thu Jan 12, 2006 1:38 pm

Been looking at the XTi with fibreglass shaft/N12 blades and 4 way split, works out at about £140ish or would i be better off using the basic XTi's which work out at £120ish?

Any ideas, they're there as a back up rather than my main paddle, or would i be better off with the emergency paddle?

THanks

Ed

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tomhollis
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Post by tomhollis » Thu Jan 12, 2006 1:41 pm

What are the basic paddles? Or what is the difference?

Tom

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Ed Lefley
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Post by Ed Lefley » Thu Jan 12, 2006 1:51 pm

http://www.lendal.co.uk/page.asp?pgid=500010028 and then click on either the Recreation Tab or the Explorer Tab, scroll down to the split options (4 way, straight shaft)


I do only want them for emergency / occasional use so possibly the best bet are the basic ones

Ed

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tomhollis
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Post by tomhollis » Thu Jan 12, 2006 2:11 pm

I think the nylon blade are significantly stronger for the money, but if you rarely use them does it matter?

Tom

Jon Wood
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Post by Jon Wood » Thu Jan 12, 2006 2:13 pm

Don't forget you can also get a Vari-Lok centre joint, which allows for RH/LH, adjustable feather and length. Ideal if you ever have to lend your spare paddle out.
I've only used it when demo-ing Lendals, and it felt as solid as any other Paddlok join.

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StoneWeasel
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Post by StoneWeasel » Thu Jan 12, 2006 2:33 pm

tomhollis wrote:I think the nylon blade are significantly stronger for the money, but if you rarely use them does it matter?

Tom
I would say probably yes.
The time you are likely to need your splits is when you are doing something a little hardcore on which you have just snapped your normal paddles so the last thing you want is relativly weak paddles.

Oh yea when you get splits use them a bit and get used to them as you also don't want to have to use them for the first time running something hard.

Just my thoughts anyway,
Denzil

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TomW
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Post by TomW » Thu Jan 12, 2006 3:34 pm

StoneWeasel wrote: Oh yea when you get splits use them a bit and get used to them as you also don't want to have to use them for the first time running something hard.
I think this is my point really. If your getting splits as an emergency spare, don't buy something that you 'have to use get used to' just because it'll save you a few quid.

Buy something you'd be happy switching your normal paddle for at any time, so that when you are on that hard creek and break your normal paddle your performance isn’t un-necessarily worsened by a different paddle.

If you're simply buying a paddle you can break down to travel easier with then this won't really be an issue.

My 2p.

Tom

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Helen H
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Post by Helen H » Thu Jan 12, 2006 4:47 pm

Slightly off subject, but was it you who had lost your kayak recently? Hope you've been reunited.

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TomW
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Post by TomW » Thu Jan 12, 2006 5:14 pm

Me? No, not lost one for a couple of years now. Still waiting for the call from an oil rig to say they've found it too. Not that It'll be any use, I saw it destroyed in front of my own eyes before rising water levels washed it away.

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Jim
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Post by Jim » Thu Jan 12, 2006 6:25 pm

Ed Lefley wrote:Been looking at the XTi with fibreglass shaft/N12 blades and 4 way split, works out at about £140ish or would I be better off using the basic XTi's which work out at £120ish?

Any ideas, they're there as a back up rather than my main paddle, or would I be better off with the emergency paddle?

THanks

Ed
I think my Carbon/Nylon Xti Blades with a 4-piece HPS shaft were around the same price as a set of werners when I got them, but it might not be your ideal setup.

The Basic blades (SF and LF) are polypropylene I think, quite heavy and not the strongest. Nylon blades come in N6 and N12 (or used to), N12 being lighter than N6, much stronger. Then come the Carbon/N12 blades which are fairly light and very tough, I hardly have any dents in mine, they have lasted much better than other "tough" blades like schlegels. Lendal now offer most of their blades in Carbon Composite, superlight and I use them on my fixed paddle.

There are then a number of shafts, "fibreglass" doesn't actually say much! There are Economy glass shafts (2 different grades I think), Economy Carbon shafts (all have some glass in them), 2 grades of more expensive carbon shafts (I use G1F on my one piece paddles) and the HPS shaft which is a mixture of carbon and Kevlar - these shafts are often seen on other manufacturers paddles, Gorrillas for example.

Check the website out because Lendal can recommend different combinations for different types of paddling. The Nylon blades are good, but the Carbon/Nylon ones are lighter to carry in your boat. I prefer the feel of carbon shafts and lendal can advise which ones work best with which paddles - the HPS shaft whilst bombproof is on the heavy side.

I suspect something like Carbon/Nylon blades on an economy carbon shaft would make a good set up for carrying spares, but it depends entirely on whether you like carbon shafts or not, and if you think the weight saving is worth the money over nylon blades.

As for blade shape, pick whatever is closest to your normal blades - the Xti is quite an aggressive blade and might not suit if you normally use a symetric blade for example.

JIM

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