Hints & Tips For Training

Inland paddling
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Taz
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Hints & Tips For Training

Post by Taz » Tue Jan 17, 2006 7:41 pm

I paddle an open canoe and am looking at venturing further a field planning longer trips inclusive of overnight camps. I am hoping someone can suggest training methods, I currently do weight training and mountain biking but I do find open canoe paddling gets to other muscles. Does anybody out there do any other type of training for open canoe paddling or specific exercises?

Thanks

TAZ
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taz

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Ricks-Freestyle-Mind
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Post by Ricks-Freestyle-Mind » Tue Jan 17, 2006 8:08 pm

Hi

Before i went to Norway, knowing i'll be paddling every day, i just got my dumbells from out of the cupboard. I also increased my stomach muscles, by doing scruntches and sit ups every night for two months. I also went jogging and chose less down hill routes on my bike. I also carried 10kg wieght in my camel back. Superior athlete or what! I did take it a bit extreme!

Rick

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Mark R
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Post by Mark R » Tue Jan 17, 2006 8:11 pm

I can't really talk about Open boating, only paddling in general. The only bit of open canoeing I've done in recent years was on a chain of lakes in New York State last summer. This experience left me deformed and lop-sided like Quasimodo for weeks afterwards.*

However, MTBing I can talk about with some knowledge. I bought myself a mountain bike for Christmas (no one else was going to) and it's one of the best things I've done in years. My first few rides were pretty hard work, but I seem to be - extremely slowly, but surely - developing that extra lung that MTBers have. In short, within a month of riding 2-3 times a week, it has already had a noticeable positive impact on my cardio-vascular fitness.

More crucially, it's a great laugh. Bombing downhill whilst desperately trying to make the brakes work isn't ever going to replace whitewater for me, but it's one of the nearest feelings I'm ever going to get on the way home from work. Stepping through the door of the house caked in mud and cowsh*t is also surprisingly satisfying and has the added bonus of making you more adorable to your partner. Especially when you start taking the bike apart in the living room.

The extras are good too...this evening, I was biking up on the Purbeck Ridge (complicated route home from work) when I noticed a large crowd of spindly people fifty metres away, silhouetted against a brilliant sunset over Portland Bill. Looking again, I realised it was a group of stags. Sunday night, on the ridge in darkness, I nearly ran over three owls in as many minutes. Which probably means something.

Anyway...MTBing perfectly complements my paddling, from the point of view of fitness, thrills and experiencing nature. And whoever here recommended buying my '2006 Avalanche 1.0 Disk', I owe a debt of gratitude. It's brilliant.

Mark Rainsley
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*Disclaimer for K Hughes et al: This is not true. It is an exaggeration and misrepresentation for dramatic effect. Actually, an Open boater is twice the man despite only having half the paddle, and can easily handle extreme whitewater on the same terms as any kayaker etc. etc.
Last edited by Mark R on Tue Jan 17, 2006 10:54 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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Tom_Laws
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Post by Tom_Laws » Tue Jan 17, 2006 8:17 pm

guidebook wrote: I nearly ran over three owls in as many minutes. Which probably means something.
You had ET in your basket and were flying?

On a more serious note, Mountain biking is good for cardiovascular, and also just general well being. Unless your mother objects to you taking it apart in the front room!

Other stuff that is good fun and beneficial is climbing, for developing strong all round shoulders that are more "pop resistant".

Don't pay money to go to a Gym, the great outdoors is just that, great!

Tom

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Adrian Cooper
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Post by Adrian Cooper » Tue Jan 17, 2006 9:08 pm

guidebook wrote:*Disclaimer for K Hughes et al: This is not true. It is an exaggeration and misrepresentation for dramatic effect. Actually, an Open boater is twice the man despite only having half the paddle, and can easily handle extreme whitewater on the same terms as any kayaker etc. etc.
Go on Mark, tell us what you really think! ;-)

In answer to the original question, I have a rigorous training regime which involves going paddling at every opportunity. On average about twice a week with weekends away whenever I can get a pass and a holiday away if I can push it. (I try to avoid lifting heavy weights since there is no pleasure in it). This is all excellent training and has resulted in my having one enormous muscley arm and one week and feeble on. In my spare time I am a campanologist.

Taz
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Post by Taz » Tue Jan 17, 2006 11:08 pm

Thanks for the advice it appears I am doing what I should be doing which is very reassuring. However, more paddling will be included in my regime.

Thanks

Taz
taz

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buck197
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Post by buck197 » Wed Jan 18, 2006 5:29 pm

The other good thing about commuting on a bike is it destresses me on the way home from work, my mind wanders away from work matters on to what matters. Bikes and Boats are very compatible.

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