Sea Kayak paddle choice

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Nimajneb2005
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Sea Kayak paddle choice

Post by Nimajneb2005 » Sun Jan 22, 2017 12:12 am

Hi guys and girls,

I'm just getting into sea kayaking now. Have a boat and plenty of white water kayaking and canoeing type of kit, as such I have been paddling mostly with my lovely fibreglass, cranked werner powerhouse. I was wondering what people's opinion was on paddle choice. As I'm getting better (and enjoying it) I was looking at getting some new kit. Would a different paddle have a dramatic effect on my performance? Should I get a split paddle I can adjust? What about winged paddles? I can't imagine trying to do a roll with one of them! Just trying to get a feel for the market before I buy the wrong thing or get taken for a fool in a paddle shop (or if it won't be that worth while at all).

Cheers.

PlymouthDamo
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Re: Sea Kayak paddle choice

Post by PlymouthDamo » Sun Jan 22, 2017 4:37 pm

You'll see a definite performance improvement when you change to a more sea-oriented paddle, but only after you've put the hours in and developed the right stroke. Your options are a (longer, narrower) euro-blade, a wing (or a hybrid euro/wing which a friend raves about) or Greenland stick.

Like you, I started sea kayaking with my trusty Werner whitewater paddle, which was fine. I didn't do any research into better sea paddles - I just got bullied into going Greenland and after initially despising it, I now love it. My old whitewater paddle was right-handed, and obviously a Greenland stick is flat - but that hasn't made any difference other than making life more straightforward when rolling. I'm sure I'd have felt the same about any other sea-oriented paddle if I'd put the hours in - any longer paddle with a narrower blade will give you both low cadence and effort which is better on long runs.

Mac50L
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Re: Sea Kayak paddle choice

Post by Mac50L » Sun Jan 22, 2017 11:39 pm

Applying a bit of logic means feathered is unnecessary (wind from ahead for a small percentage of paddling time) or dangerous at times (beam winds). Logic points to a Greenland paddle with its Wing profile and high buoyancy for support or recovery if you can't roll. I've pointed out complains I've had from one new user - doesn't raise blisters, makes rolling too easy and having to sit around waiting for others to catch up (I'd warned her about the "problems").

But then there are biased paddlers so go with what suits you - but keep an open mind.

rockhopper
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Re: Sea Kayak paddle choice

Post by rockhopper » Mon Jan 23, 2017 10:19 am

I would say, if you are used to a cranked set of euro paddles there is little point in making life more complex by changing from that, especially if you are getting a 'new' sea kayak. The boat and the way it handles will be different to river boats as I am sure you know. Turning and such like will often involve different strokes and methods. Consequently, having a type of paddle that you are very familiar with and that you therefore know it's angles and placement/feel in the water will be a help and a 'comfort' rather than another unknown that you have to get to grips with.
Like PlymouthDamo I used my whitewater paddle when I started sea kayaking (Werner Player - 197cm) and I loved it. Used it for 7 years and found it solid and reliable but then I do paddle with a high angle style. I did try other paddles but only recently changed to a VE paddle that is superb.
It's worth you reading some of the other discussions that have been on the site about paddles such as this recent one viewtopic.php?f=45&t=125677

Rog.

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PeterG
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Re: Sea Kayak paddle choice

Post by PeterG » Tue Jan 24, 2017 4:27 pm

Blade size is important, maybe more so than shape. Unless you intend shoveling water to get on that first wave in a tide race go for 600cm2 rather than 750. A bit of give in the shaft is good as well if your shoulders/elbows/wrists are to be happy after a 30 nm day, so a modest carbon content and not too long. I like the Epic relaxed or one of the lazy style AT paddles like the Quest with its curvy loom. Having said that if I'm off paddling day after day for weeks where any strains and aches have to be avoided at all costs would always be the greenland stick for me.

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GrahamC
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Re: Sea Kayak paddle choice

Post by GrahamC » Sat Jan 28, 2017 1:29 pm

I paddle almost exclusively using a wing and rolling with a wing is dead easy - but, unless you have a racing backgound and already use a wing, I would not make it my first paddle of choice. I would choose a reasonable quality euro that splits. Reason, you can use it as your main paddle to start with and then keep it as your split set later. Although I use a wing, if I am paddling with others I will carry Euro splits just in case someone else needs to borrow them - not the best time to learn a new paddle technique. Also, a wing is lousy for stern rudder strokes which makes it a bit "draggy" when surfing.

Size, don't go too big! I think that people find Greenlands less stressful on joints primarily because they have a smaller area, less force higher cadence seems to the the recipe for efficiency in most sports with a repetitive action (think cycling).

Another reason for having a Euro first is that if you ever want to hire or borrow a paddle you will get far more choice in Euro blades.

After saying all that, you could also go Greenland, but be aware that you will need to learn some different strokes from your WW experience.

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MikeB
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Re: Sea Kayak paddle choice

Post by MikeB » Sat Jan 28, 2017 3:13 pm

AS with all such things, do try and test a few paddles before you buy. All the above advice is sound, especially that about not choosing too big a blade. Epic, Werner and Celtic (Lendal) are generally regarded highly. Certainly consider a split, if only for ease of transport. Whether you need feather and / or length adjustment is a moot point and my own experience is that once you've got the appropriate feather and length choice, there's little to be gained from the extra cost.

(This said, my spare set is multi-adjustable but that is in part to give more options if I have to lend them to another member of the group)

If you like cranks, certainly consider them for a sea paddle too. I found that they are far easier on the wrists, and also allow me a much more relaxed, open grip on the shaft. Material choice is very important - I have an old set of plastic bladed Lendals with a straight, f/glass shaft. In comparison to my main set of full carbon, cranked Lendals they are truly horrible, But until I discovered the carbon cranked ones I was quite happy with them.

Feather is highly personal - most sets seem to come with a 60 degree feather as standard - I like that, and I've tried all the permutations! I do know folk with 0 feather who seem to like that.

Returning to the choice of manufacturer, I had a set of Epics which were very nice and I only changed back to Lendal as I didn't like the big collar which Epic use for the two part joint. I am a big fan of the Lendal "Padlok" system btw. As to the Werner / Celtic (Lendal) choice, I tried several Werners and didn't get on with them at all. I found they had a sort of "catch" as they left the water at the end of the stroke but that may be more about my paddling style than anything else.

My partner had a set of Werners and changed to Celtic / Lendal after trying mine. For the same reason. However, she sold the Werners within a few days of advertising them so clearly there are folk who love them. All our Lendals are four-parters which does mean easy repair if a bit gets damaged, and also allows for easy air-travel if necessary. This said, we've never broken them down for transport other than as two-parters. If you get them, I do recommend stripping the Padlok and applying coppa-slip to the grub screw - repeat every few years - otherwise they are known to seize. On that subject, the Werner joint has been known to stick - and also to wear.

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Re: Sea Kayak paddle choice

Post by Owen » Sun Jan 29, 2017 8:15 pm

With all the post from people raving about Greenland paddle I feel I should point out that not everyone gets on with them. I've tried them and absolutely hate them. As with most things try before you buy.

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Re: Sea Kayak paddle choice

Post by M-J-B » Mon Jan 30, 2017 9:36 am

Mac50L wrote:Applying a bit of logic means feathered is unnecessary
In my logical view feathered is not unnecessary. Wind is not the main reason for paddling with a feathered paddle. Neutral wrist alignment during a power stoke is the main reason to feather the paddle. If you have a split paddle you can test it in calm conditions with the split joint unlocked allowing the joint to rotate freely. Paddle one full stroke cycle with a neutral firm grip of the paddle shaft with both hands. You will notice the shaft pieces have rotated somewhat in the joint and this is basically the correct feather for you. The higher the stroke the greater the feather angle. If your paddling style is low (which it usually is during long distance paddling with a GP) then you do not need any feather. If you prefer Euro or wing and want to go fast then a high style is more efficient and more feather is needed to spare your wrists. Sure, feather also reduces wind drag from ahead, and in conditions with no actual wind to consider wind forces are generated by the boat and paddle moving forwards but I consider this effect as neglible with typical blade sizes so there is no reason to over do the feather. Needed feather is highly personal depending on your paddle, stroke and physical dimensions.

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Jim
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Re: Sea Kayak paddle choice

Post by Jim » Mon Jan 30, 2017 5:27 pm

MikeB wrote:If you like cranks, certainly consider them for a sea paddle too. I found that they are far easier on the wrists, and also allow me a much more relaxed, open grip on the shaft. Material choice is very important - I have an old set of plastic bladed Lendals with a straight, f/glass shaft. In comparison to my main set of full carbon, cranked Lendals they are truly horrible, But until I discovered the carbon cranked ones I was quite happy with them.
There are a lot of factors in play, until recently I found the same as you that cranked paddles were easier on my wrists. Then I developed wrist pain using my cranked slalom paddle, yet when I use my straight shaft polo paddle I have no pain. In this case it is probably not the cranked shaft itself that causes the pain, the paddle in question has huge blades and a lot of forward offset, when I first got it I was forever slicing it because I wasn't used to the offest and planting slightly off angle would make it slice. I think therefore that the problem is probably that I grip too hard when trying to control that paddle, in certain situations, and I just need to adapt to it a bit better - certainly going back is not an option, it enables me to move the boat in ways I just can't with a less powerful paddle.

For my sea paddle I use medium sized blades on a modified crank shaft, that is a shaft where the crank is arranged so that the middle of the grip is in line with the blade, neither offset in front or behind it as you get with some other types of crank shafts. Again this is a paddle I can use for many hours without any troubles at all, in fact I have started using it for the sprint training recently - I can't compare directly with my performance using the slalom paddle for a pure sprint because I am working on my WWR so have been doing the training in my sea kayak for the last couple of weeks - although nearly twice the weight, it is 4' longer, more stable and I can steer it with my feet so I am definitely going faster in the sea kayak than I was in the WWR, but too many factors have changed to identify whether changing paddle at the same time has made a difference to my speed.

Whatever you are thinking, don't go radical with your first touring paddle, choose something medium in area, a bit longer than you use on WW, maybe up to 215cm long, touring style of blade (can be assymmetric but not too aggressive), straight or neutral crank shaft. Wings are best left for later, you could start with greenland if you wanted, but try some first (greenland paddlers are always keen to convert people so getting a go should be easy!) and take a split WW paddle along just in case you decide after 10 miles that you really are not getting on with them!

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MikeB
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Re: Sea Kayak paddle choice

Post by MikeB » Mon Jan 30, 2017 6:14 pm

Jim wrote: I think therefore that the problem is probably that I grip too hard when trying to control that paddle, in certain situations - -
Quite possibly - I certainly find that the Lendal crank lets me have a very "open" grip - in fact, all the straight shafted Lendals I've had have tended to flutter in the water, so requiring a tight grip. The cranked ones don't flutter.

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Re: Sea Kayak paddle choice

Post by GrahamC » Mon Jan 30, 2017 6:42 pm

MikeB wrote: the Werner joint has been known to stick - and also to wear.
One of our paddle group always spits on his werner paddle joint before assembly and, since he has been doing this, we have avoided the ritual tug-of-war in the car park at the end of the day.
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Re: Sea Kayak paddle choice

Post by Chris Bolton » Mon Jan 30, 2017 7:59 pm

Needed feather is highly personal depending on your paddle, stroke and physical dimensions.
To which I would add "and what you're used to using". I've been told many times about ways to find out one's "natural feather", with an insistence that feather is necessary to avoid rotating the wrists. I'm sure everybody who says this believes it, but they all use feather, and this affects the experiment. I've paddled with zero feather for at least the last 25 years, so I've lost the muscle memory from paddling with a feather, and I don't rotate my wrists. I know I don't, and I've posted a video showing that I don't. But I agree with the conclusion, that we should all use whatever feather suits us!

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MikeB
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Re: Sea Kayak paddle choice

Post by MikeB » Mon Jan 30, 2017 10:05 pm

GrahamC wrote:
MikeB wrote: the Werner joint has been known to stick - and also to wear.
One of our paddle group always spits on his werner paddle joint before assembly and, since he has been doing this, we have avoided the ritual tug-of-war in the car park at the end of the day.
Nice. Something I've not observed Lendal users having to do - - -

Although I have noted some interesting exercises involving the old-style Varo-lok systems - notably one which ended up with reversing the feather - on the water, in the dark, in a snow-storm, that was fun. Not.

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Jim
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Re: Sea Kayak paddle choice

Post by Jim » Mon Jan 30, 2017 10:47 pm

MikeB wrote:
Jim wrote: I think therefore that the problem is probably that I grip too hard when trying to control that paddle, in certain situations - -
Quite possibly - I certainly find that the Lendal crank lets me have a very "open" grip - in fact, all the straight shafted Lendals I've had have tended to flutter in the water, so requiring a tight grip. The cranked ones don't flutter.
Flutter is often down to too big a blade, could it be that you also downsized when you switched to the crank?

To be honest my problem is probably partly to do with needing to get used to the blade size as well as the offset - a little flutter with extreme offset will quickly get out of hand, and require excess grip to control.

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Re: Sea Kayak paddle choice

Post by Mac50L » Tue Jan 31, 2017 3:33 am

M-J-B wrote:
Mac50L wrote:Applying a bit of logic means feathered is unnecessary
I said/meant "windage is usually the excuse". As Chris above says and I say too from using paddles as long as he has (over 3 decades), no feather, no memory of wrist twist. I've also heard of a number of paddlers with wrist problems removing feather, including one very predominant American paddler.
In my logical view feathered is not unnecessary. Wind is not the main reason for paddling with a feathered paddle. Neutral wrist alignment during a power stoke is the main reason to feather the paddle. If you have a split paddle you can test it in calm conditions with the split joint unlocked allowing the joint to rotate freely. Paddle one full stroke cycle with a neutral firm grip of the paddle shaft with both hands.
Both hands "firmly on the Paddle". A vice grip? Well there's another problem which can also lead to blisters.

Making things easier, my loom is rectangular meaning my fingers form a right-angle and pull the loom/blade (Greenland paddle). The other, upper hand, quite open, pushes (the power with the body rotation) and the base of the finger is against the loom/blade. Thumbs? They are there to stop the paddle falling on the deck. Hands are open, no stress on wrists or hand.
The higher the stroke the greater the feather angle.
This also means the higher the paddle angle the..... - well actually no difference at all, It all stays the same as far as a requirement for feathering - zero, zilch....
If your paddling style is low (which it usually is during long distance paddling with a GP)
No. No different from any other paddler, possibly higher. Low angle maybe while waiting for other to catch up - yes.
then you do not need any feather. If you prefer Euro or wing and want to go fast then a high style is more efficient and more feather is needed to spare your wrists.
As said, NO.
Needed feather is highly personal.
I'll agree there. Fullstop, personal, nothing to do with body, paddle length, time of day or what was had for breakfast.

Flutter mentioned above is usually due to pulling straight back instead of using body rotation with only one edge of the paddle shedding water.

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MikeB
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Re: Sea Kayak paddle choice

Post by MikeB » Tue Jan 31, 2017 10:55 am

Jim wrote:
MikeB wrote:
Jim wrote: I think therefore that the problem is probably that I grip too hard when trying to control that paddle, in certain situations - -
Quite possibly - I certainly find that the Lendal crank lets me have a very "open" grip - in fact, all the straight shafted Lendals I've had have tended to flutter in the water, so requiring a tight grip. The cranked ones don't flutter.
Flutter is often down to too big a blade, could it be that you also downsized when you switched to the crank?
Yes - from a Powermaster or Nordkapp (can't remember) to the Kenetik. This said, the plastic bladed, straight shafted set I have are broadly similar to the Kinetiks, but will also flutter. I note M-J-B's comment about "pulling straight back", but I rotate.

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Re: Sea Kayak paddle choice

Post by M-J-B » Tue Jan 31, 2017 11:15 am

Mac50L wrote:...
In addition to not being able to quote correctly Mac50L seems to be on a trolling expedition but I'll comment anyways:

The tip on how to set up paddle feather is supposed to be a starting point instead of accepting some old beard stating 80 degree (or whatever) is best for all. Most land somewhere between 30 and 60 so there is a lot of variation due to a number of reasons, breakfast not being one of them. Naturally I do not suggest using a vice grip continuously but only during the test cycle which will reveal the feather that comes naturally. Another alternative is to have someone film you while you paddle and later measure the angle between lower and upper arm positions during the paddle cycle which will practically be the same as needed paddle feather. The aim is to minimise wrist rotation (wrist straight during load) in all directions while being able to have a reasonably good grip for controlling the paddle in different conditions. Too much feather will naturally also cause problems. There is a lot of material available on this topic and studies have been done for years and years. A lot has been learned from the tracks that can not always be directly applied to sea kayaking with success but there are some good pointers if paddling efficiency is what you are aiming for. As the euro/wing stroke becomes more efficient the style becomes higher and the feather angle has a tendency to rise. Normally loose grip is recommended and it also reduces the need for a cranked shaft helping maintaining wrist position. Personally I do not like cranked shafts but I understand others do, and I am not saying cranked is wrong just because I don't need or prefer it. Straight arms and torso rotation belong to the basics regardless of paddling discipline. Kayaking exprerience in years is not the key factor (although I might add I also have paddled for over 3 decades), moon phases are also totally irrelevant in this context. Most GP paddlers I have observed use lower style during cruising compared to wing & high angle euro paddlers, sprints and tricks is a different story. To me GP was developed during an era when good alternative materials were hard to come by and basically you had to make do with whatever floated ashore, so although it is successful it doesn't mean it has to be the only and ultimately best solution. Sure, the GP tehnique has developed a lot over the years and it is also highly efficient and being a later invention the euro style has been lagging behind but it has also catched up quickly. So, always keep in mind that not all best practices can be applied to all the different disciplines. I mainly keep to euro as I have failed to see the benefits of the other alternatives in context to the kayaking I do.

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Re: Sea Kayak paddle choice

Post by M-J-B » Tue Jan 31, 2017 11:20 am

MikeB wrote:I note M-J-B's comment about "pulling straight back", but I rotate.
Sorry, you lost me there. What comment? I also rotate. And mostly where paddle flutter is an issue it's not due to paddle size but rather due to paddle blade shape & design and also due to paddling technique. The tendency is that big blades are quite unforgiving - so unless you are a track sprinter I wouldn't use them.

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Re: Sea Kayak paddle choice

Post by MikeB » Wed Feb 01, 2017 9:53 am

M-J-B wrote:
MikeB wrote:I note M-J-B's comment about "pulling straight back", but I rotate.
Sorry, you lost me there. What comment? I also rotate. And mostly where paddle flutter is an issue it's not due to paddle size but rather due to paddle blade shape & design and also due to paddling technique. The tendency is that big blades are quite unforgiving - so unless you are a track sprinter I wouldn't use them.
Oops - Correction. That refs Mac50L's post , 31 Jan 2017 04:33 - not yours, M-J-B.

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Re: Sea Kayak paddle choice

Post by Jim » Wed Feb 01, 2017 1:50 pm

MikeB wrote: I note M-J-B's comment about "pulling straight back", but I rotate.
Aha, I thought I did until I started paddling with some people who really do!

I'm not saying whether you do or don't because I've never seen you paddle, just that sometimes a second opinion from a race paddler can be useful :)

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Re: Sea Kayak paddle choice

Post by pathbrae » Wed Feb 01, 2017 5:01 pm

Wow - what a lot of opinions!
My own personal preference (and this is only my own preference....) is straight shaft, medium blades, the lighter the better, feather of about 45 degrees, which I have reduced from 60 over the past year. (I started paddling when 90 degrees was all you could get in "good" paddles and 0 degrees was what you got with cheap sets)
Over the years I've paddled with wings, Lendal Kinetiks, Euros of various sizes and straight and cranked shafts of different lengths and have more or less settled on straight, 210cm, 45 degrees as my preferred sea kayak paddles. Possibly if I buy a different boat I might find I like a longer or a shorter shaft or a bigger blade.....
I've never felt the need to use crank shafts.
Lendal shafts give me blisters unless I "rough them up" a bit in the grip area - I think they might be almost too smooth.
I like my Lendal paddles (or Celtic) but I'd hesitate to paddle anywhere in the Clyde area with a blade with a giant CELTIC logo on it - it might just be too much of a target for some of the local football cognoscenti.
I prefer my Werners as I don't need a "key" to lock the joint.
I prefer a high angle blade - but usually lapse into a lazy low angle style for cruising
I paddle with very loose grips - so much so that I can't paddle for any length of time in pogies as I cant open my grip enough to be comfortable.
Carbon blades are light (and look good...) but might not be as useful as a light coloured blade for attracting attention (remember the fluorescent Shlegel river paddles of the 90s?)
I always regret putting even just a few grammes of retro-flective tape onto a very light paddle blade - I'm sure I can feel the difference! :-)
I rotate - but not as much as I would like to (a few layers, a dry suit, a tight fitting spray deck and a heavy, pocketed BA makes "proper" rotation very difficult in a sea kayak)

I think my own experience is that preferences change massively, both between paddlers and over time so there's no easy answer to the "what's the best paddle" type of question

Getting back to the original question....
Would a different paddle have a dramatic effect on my performance? Should I get a split paddle I can adjust? What about winged paddles?
I'd say no, not a dramatic difference.
Yes - your current main paddle will almost certainly end up as you spare after a while so get a split set.
And - try them and see. Some people find wings great and easy to roll with - other folks can't stand them. I find them OK, fine for forward paddling strokes but "interesting" for some steering strokes or for unexpected braces. I'll use them if I am trying to get from A to B as quickly as possible in as straight a line as possible - but what's the fun in that?
So much sea - so little time to see it.

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Re: Sea Kayak paddle choice

Post by Mac50L » Wed Feb 01, 2017 6:58 pm

M-J-B wrote:In addition to not being able to quote correctly Mac50L seems to be on a trolling expedition but I'll comment anyways:
You mean the block of text in yellow? Some sites work easily some don't so I suspect I missed adding a bit of HTML code in the right place. As for trolling, like to explain?
To me GP was developed during an era when good alternative materials were hard to come by and basically you had to make do with whatever floated ashore,
If it was possible for the Aleutians and Inuits to construct complicated kayak frames why the difficulty in making a wide bladed paddle if it was worth doing? Dowelling and lashing extra timber to widen the blade would be simple. So maybe the narrow blade was the way to go - light blades but with buoyancy for support while throwing a harpoon or fishing. They make rolling easy. They are easy to make and make a strong paddle where strength is needed without adding unwanted weight. The shape of the Greenland paddle makes sense all round.

Personally I find a Euro paddle crude and the Wing is the development of a Euro to GP effectiveness.

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Re: Sea Kayak paddle choice

Post by M-J-B » Thu Feb 02, 2017 12:36 am

Mac50L wrote: You mean the block of text in yellow? Some sites work easily some don't so I suspect I missed adding a bit of HTML code in the right place. As for trolling, like to explain?
Yes, there is a preview function available so it's quite easy on this site. ;) Your statements about the total lack of need for feathering were written in a style a troll might use, simple as that.
Mac50L wrote:If it was possible for the Aleutians and Inuits to construct complicated kayak frames why the difficulty in making a wide bladed paddle if it was worth doing? Dowelling and lashing extra timber to widen the blade would be simple. So maybe the narrow blade was the way to go - light blades but with buoyancy for support while throwing a harpoon or fishing. They make rolling easy. They are easy to make and make a strong paddle where strength is needed without adding unwanted weight. The shape of the Greenland paddle makes sense all round.
Equally someone might claim that the sole existence of Euro paddles is proof that there has been a need to improve on the GP design.

Yes, the Greenland paddle makes sense given the need, materials and tools that have been available in the past. It still makes sense in some applications. Trying to create a wide blade out of solid wood (without modern tools and adhesives) was probably not that easy when weight and durability without doubt was a crucial factor also in the past. Using skin-on-frame type of approach for paddle design certainly has drawbacks also, it's not exactly foam core carbon fiber. Times are changing, we are no longer hunting whales from kayaks. Some might also argue it was a mistake to start building kayaks out of stiff composite materials (glass/kevlar/carbon/polyester/vinylester/epoxy whatever) and skin on frame is the ultimate in performance kayak design.
Mac50L wrote:Personally I find a Euro paddle crude and the Wing is the development of a Euro to GP effectiveness.
I can respect that as an opinion but I personally do not fully agree. I believe both the Euro and GP are more versatile than the Wing. The Wing has been developed for a specific purpose and subset of kayaking. Although different support strokes & tricks can be done with the Wing the same (or comparable) strokes are easier to accomplish with a Euro or GP. GP paddlers have made paddle tricks a sport on it's own where forward propulsion many times seem to be the least interesting thing to do. Also, not many GP paddlers are able to keep up with top athletes using Wings... I'm not saying it can't be done but it seems to be easier to compete with a Wing. Perhaps the learning curve to really master the Wing for effective forward propulsion is not as steep as the learning curve for performing equally with a GP. In my view there is room for all three paddle types and selection is done based on personal preference and/or the type of kayaking that one is interested in. WW paddles are also a subset of Euro:s, I have not yet witnessed anyone using GP:s in WW or polo but I wouldn't be surprised if it has been attempted but for sure it isn't trending. Some sea kayaking has similarities to WW so it's hardly surprising that the gear also resemble each other.

The fact that you do not need feather for your GP doesn't mean it isn't beneficial for many Euro & Wing paddlers.

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