Dragonfly or Omnifuel?^

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Enray
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Dragonfly or Omnifuel?^

Post by Enray » Thu Sep 23, 2010 5:43 pm

Hi,

I have spondoolies to spend on a new stove. Until now I have been using gas and have for a long while wanted to move towards a multifuel stove. I have my eye on either a MSR Dragonfly or a Primus Omnifuel. I have checked previous threads through the almanac and the search facility about stoves, but have not found the information that offers any differentiation between these two - so, what suggestions do folks have - especially those who have experience of one or both of these stoves?

Thanks in advance,

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MikeB
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Re: Dragonfly or Omnifuel?

Post by MikeB » Thu Sep 23, 2010 7:08 pm

I can't help directly with the specific request, but I can comment that the MSR stoves are excellent bits of kit . I've used an MSR Whisperlite Internationale for 10 years and despite a challenge in getting it to simmer, it's superb. The "self cleaning jet" is a big plus and I think the D/fly also uses one, whereas the Omnifuel seems to need to be cleaned with a pricker.

Other folk have experienced probs with blockages and such like with the MSR - but I've never had a problem - I do keep the fuel tube / bottle permenantly attached and I have a theory that this prevents grit and dust from getting into the tube or the pump outlet. Getting parts is certainly easy for the MSR - no idea what it's like for Primus.

All this said, I bought a gas converter for my old Trangia last year, and have barely used the MSR since. Just an additional thought perhaps?

Mike.

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Re: Dragonfly or Omnifuel?

Post by AHPP » Thu Sep 23, 2010 8:31 pm

Dragonfly has shaker jet cleaning. Mine does anyway.
I've done no maintenance in the 6 years I've had mine and it still works fine.

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Re: Dragonfly or Omnifuel?

Post by David A » Thu Sep 23, 2010 9:56 pm

Hi Nick, I have been using the Primus Omni fuel for about ten months now and I am very pleased with the performance. Only time and abuse will reveal the durability of the stove. The construction of the stove seems first class. Hopefully the investment will be worth it in the long run. The majority of my cooking has been done with Colman’s gas cartridges. Boiling water for a brew up is very quick. What I am impressed with is the fuel/burn regulator and the fine adjustment that is possible for simmering purposes. Happy cooking whatever your choice is.
The old and the new.
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Re: Dragonfly or Omnifuel?

Post by wideblueyonder » Thu Sep 23, 2010 10:16 pm

My MSR XGK is still going strong - bought in 1992 :-)

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Re: Dragonfly or Omnifuel?

Post by AHPP » Thu Sep 23, 2010 10:24 pm

Forgot about the pumps.

MSR pumps are plastic. I snapped a bit off the plunger thumb bit when I accidentally kicked the bottle down the stairs. Could have just as easily snapped the plunger quill.
I'd be happier with a metal pump assembly.

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Re: Dragonfly or Omnifuel?

Post by MikeB » Thu Sep 23, 2010 10:34 pm

AHPP wrote:Forgot about the pumps.

MSR pumps are plastic. I snapped a bit off the plunger thumb bit when I accidentally kicked the bottle down the stairs. Could have just as easily snapped the plunger quill.
I'd be happier with a metal pump assembly.
Yes, I'd prefer a metal pump assembly too. That said, I've never had a problem with the MSR pump although it's always been on my list of things I expect to have problems with.

Dave - that's a well used Gaz stove!

Mike.

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Re: Dragonfly or Omnifuel?

Post by David A » Thu Sep 23, 2010 10:49 pm

MikeB wrote:that's a well used Gaz stove!
It must be about 35 years old and it is retired now. I still use it in the garage occasionally and have a brew up for old times sake. It takes twice as long as the Primus to boil the water.

Big Wave Dave

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Re: Dragonfly or Omnifuel?

Post by Chris Bolton » Thu Sep 23, 2010 10:57 pm

The Dragonfly is mostly good - but in my experience if you run it on paraffin it blocks up after about 5 days and you have to dismantle the fuel system and clean it - which is a pain when you want your meal! Maybe if I used coleman fuel or something it wouldn't block, but a multi-fuel stove that only runs on selected fuels seems a bit odd. I gave up and went back to a 25 year old Optimus paraffin stove.

Chris

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Re: Dragonfly or Omnifuel?

Post by Jim » Thu Sep 23, 2010 11:11 pm

I have had a dragonfly for quite a few years. The adjustability is great, but no better than a gas stove. The reliability, well I lent mine out once and it has never been the same since. I have broken one pump and noticed the design was subtly changed when I replaced it. It is fully field serviceable but contains a lot of small parts to lose, stripping and cleaning became part of the fun until I stopped using it. My dad got one but stupidly filled it from a can he'd been using for a mower or outboard, the 2-stroke oil completely clogged all the filters so I had to replace them for him, in the field (well perched on a ledge on Eigg). Both jets are shaker jets, but after a bit of use don't expect to actually be able to unscrew the jets to switch between the Diesel/Kerosene one and the Petrol one.

There is something satisfying about the roar of an MSR, but my friends have grown to hate it. They also grew to hate the cursing and swearing that went with it for a variety of reasons.

The bottom line is that I started to augment it with a simple gas burner (MSR pocket rocket), and now have a trangia with a gas conversion kit instead of the dragonfly. When it all comes around, the trangia IS the best option for kayaking or hiking, you can pack your entire stove and cookset inside itself, and whether using gas or meths it is reliable and predictable. Yes I hate the notion of disposable gas canisters, they seem wrong. At the end of the day though, unless you are going to be travelling where you can't find gas it is the best option.

And before someone goes on to tell me that gas is useless in cold weather, all fuels are harder to light in cold weather. The trick with gas is to warm the canister before use (bring it into the sleeping bag) and keep it insulated and off the ground in use (a stove with a remote gas canister rather than a burner which screws directly into the top is useful for extreme weather). Understand this and you can use gas in ambient temperatures below 0C.

As an engineer impressed by technical solutions, it pains me to identify that the good old simple trangia is way more useful, but that is the way it is.

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Re: Dragonfly or Omnifuel?

Post by David A » Thu Sep 23, 2010 11:24 pm

Jim wrote:There is something satisfying about the roar of an MSR
Hi Jim, I couldn’t agree more with you. The roar of the stove is comforting and always lifts the spirits even after a hardest days paddle.

Big Wave Dave

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Re: Dragonfly or Omnifuel?

Post by MikeB » Thu Sep 23, 2010 11:27 pm

I have a sense that running on gas is more expensive than running on unleaded, or Aspen - and I'm not totally convinced about the amount of space taken up by an MSR, it's bottle, and a set of pans when compared to a Trangia and a large(ish) gas canister.

Carrying a spare gas canister takes even more space - I suppose carrying a spare fuel bottle on a long trip also takes space, but I've always thought that if it came to it, I could beg something liquid and flammable for the MSR whereas finding a screw gas canister on some remote Heb island would be interesting.

Putting a partially used gas container into a pan of cold water will serve to add that little extra oomph - and the propane / butane / isobutane mix seems to work fine in the cold.

For me, while I do really like the MSR, the convenience and controllability and immediacy of the gas Trangia is a significant factor, especially first thing in the morning when its freezing and I'm trying to get a burner lit without leaving the sleeping bag. I also like its stability and it's just so efficient with its integral windshield. The MSRs really need to have the titanium burner base unless used on a hard surface, and I've had more than one dinner slide gracefully off the burner - -

But they do sound nice.

MSRs / Trangias / skegs - ahhh, the joy of sea kayaking - - -

Mike.

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Re: Dragonfly or Omnifuel?

Post by geoffm » Thu Sep 23, 2010 11:43 pm

The noise from the Dragonfly is a disadvantage not to be ignored. It stops all conversation and can create friction amongst group members. I have also replaced 2 pumps and the burner cup has broken free at the weld once. I now use a Primus EtaPacklite.

Geoff

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Re: Dragonfly or Omnifuel?

Post by Enray » Fri Sep 24, 2010 7:52 am

A huge thanks to you all for such comprehensive replies. I am pretty set on buying either one of these stoves since I already have a trangia and a couple of gas stoves. I am not too bothered by the noise of the multifuel stove and I have to admit that I often envied the comforting roar emmiting from a friend's tent on our trips (he uses an MSR Whisperlite). It is the multifuel aspect that attracts me because I hold out hope that one day I will paddle further afield where gas cannisters do not go!

Anyway thanks again for all of your thoughts and your advice and you never know we may even meet one day on a far off beach and share a cup of tea brewed on one of our favoured stoves...

Cheers,

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Re: Dragonfly or Omnifuel?

Post by sleepybubble » Fri Sep 24, 2010 12:11 pm

Enray wrote:I have to admit that I often envied the comforting roar emmiting from a friend's tent on our trips (he uses an MSR Whisperlite).
Cheers,

I have a dragonfly and a mate has a Whisperlite, we used both on two seperate four month long trips in the States and Canada. The Whisperlite was certainly more of a phaff. I would not dare however to go through the light up process inside my tent, far too reckless.

I have cooked an estimated 2500 meals on my Dragonfly now and had to service it zero times. I do stick to clean fuel at all times. At three group meals a day (and brews) the wee bottle supplied with a Dragonfly will just make 4 days. One of the bigger 1.5l bottles will easily cover a week.

A windshield should be used for every meal, not only does it help stop the wind, but it also speeds up cooking times, and it has the added benifit of stopping your pan slipping off. Don't expect the wind shield to last though, I think I am on my fifth one of those now.

I've never used the Omnifuel so can't comment on that, but I have used all the other variations of Trangia and Gaz stoves in my time. I would not use anything else now.

Hope some of that helps.

Mark

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Re: Dragonfly or Omnifuel?

Post by EdSmith » Fri Sep 24, 2010 12:29 pm

I've run an MSR XGK since 1993, but have also been running a Ominifuel for the last 12 months

MSR
Pros
- Completely maintainable, spares available worldwide, heavy soot/deposit accumalations can scoured out of the generator tube using the wire, and can detach the fuel bottle while still pressurised.
Cons
- Limited flame control, the XGK/dragonfly is too large to pack inside a pot so risk of damage, pumps can break, needs regular cleaning

Ominfuel
Pros
- Good flame control (but this is partly due to the fact I use a cleaner fuel with this stove), better pump, packs small enough to go in a pan (and be protected from damage), much more stable pan supports (than the XGK), overall higher quality build and several little things are slightly better thought out - jet changing tool and pricker to name two.
Cons
- Can't scour the fuel line, wouldn't expect to find spares as easily, and have to depressurise the bottle before detaching the stove, otherwise you will get a fuel leak. Requires slightly longer priming than the XGK.

Can't compare frequency of cleaning of the Ominifuel viz MSR, as I ran the MSR on unleaded and the primus on cleaner Aspen 4T, so can't compare like for like.

I happily light both inside the porch of my tent if its really miserable, but would recommend that you get very familiar to which ever stove you buy before dooing so.

Overall I think the Primus is better, but if I travel overseas I take the MSR.

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Re: Dragonfly or Omnifuel?

Post by Enray » Fri Sep 24, 2010 12:43 pm

Thanks Ed & Mark - really useful information and greatly appreciated. I have to say, before I posted this question I was erring towards the Primus stove, simply because it looked more robust and from what I read this seems to be the case (albeit only slightly). The aquisition of spares might be an issue for me if ever (or when) I head further afield but I guess if by then I anticipate what I might need, I could get these before hand.

All in all really good info and I hope this helps other forum readers.

Cheers,

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Re: Dragonfly or Omnifuel?

Post by MikeB » Fri Sep 24, 2010 12:49 pm

sleepybubble wrote: I have a dragonfly and a mate has a Whisperlite, we used both on two seperate four month long trips in the States and Canada. The Whisperlite was certainly more of a phaff. I would not dare however to go through the light up process inside my tent, far too reckless.
Ah yes - the plume of black oily smoke, followed by the sheet of flame and more black oily smoke. Preheating using meths helps stop that, but as you say, in a tent - - - I dont think I'd ever try to light an MSR inside a tent, no matter how bad the conditions.

Whereas the gas Trangia is just like being at home.

(Usual safety warnings apply)

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Re: Dragonfly or Omnifuel?

Post by Bod » Fri Sep 24, 2010 1:20 pm

MikeB wrote: Whereas the gas Trangia is just like being at home.

(Usual safety warnings apply)
This just made me think of a sea-kayaker making their dinner on return from expedition, with the chilli in the big pot sitting on top of the rice in the small pot, whilst only using one of the 4 'rings' on an electric stove! I am sure there is a cartoon in there somewhere.

Trangia meths or gas for me, so I can't help the OP.
John B.

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Re: Dragonfly or Omnifuel?

Post by sleepybubble » Fri Sep 24, 2010 1:53 pm

Enray wrote:Thanks Ed & Mark - really useful information and greatly appreciated. I have to say, before I posted this question I was erring towards the Primus stove, simply because it looked more robust and from what I read this seems to be the case (albeit only slightly). The aquisition of spares might be an issue for me if ever (or when) I head further afield but I guess if by then I anticipate what I might need, I could get these before hand.

All in all really good info and I hope this helps other forum readers.

Cheers,
Slight danger of veering OT here but I do think its worthwhile advice.

On those long trips I mentioned I was sticking to clean coleman fuel, hence my zero services. I'm quite tight generally but its one thing I will spend a few extra quid on. My mate who is even tighter than me was running the whisperlite on 4* and unleaded, wich is why it was so much of a phaff, after about 4 days on any grade of petrol any of these multifuel stoves will need a damn good clean. Cleaning the stove means severely dirtying yourself and getting the oily sooty stuff off your clothes and hands in the backwoods is niegh on impossible. The expense of clean fuel FAR outwieghs the mess and annoyance of constant servicing, pricking of jets, cleaning of fuel lines and looking like a grubby mechanic.
The whisperlite got to the point of being such a pain that we were only using it if we ran out of clean fuel. If I rerember correctly my mate eventually put it into the equivelent of an 'optio drawer' and bought himself a dragonfly (which has only been run on clean fuel since) and a pocket rocket, which is now his stove of preference.

Some decent pans are also a worthwhile investment, I use the MSR duralite ones and my old trangia kettle which fits into the center of the nest. You cannot beat non stick pans when camping.

A final little tip, if you decide to cook on an open fire or a badly performing whisperlite which is a bit smokey, then smear some neat washing up liquid on the bottom and sides of your pans first. When you come to clean them the smoke stains just fall off with the mearest of wipes. Which is far better than spending hours with a scourer or sand grandually reduing the thickness of your pans to get them clean again after your meal when you want to be sat with your feet up by the fire relaxing.

Mark

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Re: Dragonfly or Omnifuel?

Post by MikeB » Fri Sep 24, 2010 2:18 pm

sleepybubble wrote: On those long trips I mentioned I was sticking to clean coleman fuel, hence my zero services. I'm quite tight generally but its one thing I will spend a few extra quid on. My mate who is even tighter than me was running the whisperlite on 4* and unleaded, wich is why it was so much of a phaff, after about 4 days on any grade of petrol any of these multifuel stoves will need a damn good clean. Cleaning the stove means severely dirtying yourself and getting the oily sooty stuff off your clothes and hands in the backwoods is niegh on impossible.
Weird - I ran my W/lite on unleaded for the first 9 years with no mess at all, and no blockages and no problems. Yes, it would get sooty and mucky if you pre-heated with petrol, but if you use meths instead then that problem goes away so no mess, and stove was always clean after being used.

Accepting that unleaded isnt really the best fuel for these stoves, I now use Aspen 4T as a Coleman fuel alternative as its cheaper and less smelly than unleaded. It can be used to pre-heat with no mess, and I even use it in a Zippo.

Mike.

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Re: Dragonfly or Omnifuel?

Post by Jim » Fri Sep 24, 2010 2:41 pm

Although I recommended against the dragonfly for normal use, if you definitely want/need a mutlifuel stove then I feel I should actually myth-bust both of Ed Smith's cons on the dragonfly......

The dragonfly flame control works perfectly well - the XGK and Whisperlite (that's an oxymoron) have no flame control other than adjusting the valve on the pump (which should be set fully open), I think Ed was thinking of them. The needle valve flame control on the dragonfly works as advertised, but if you use dirty fuel it is one more thing to clean.

Also the dragonfly can be packed in a standard MSR cookset, just. Personally I like to use the XGK heat exchanger for boiling stuff so tend to put that in the cookset along with my maintenance kit and carry the stove separately, but it can be fitted if not using the heat exchanger. MSR have cunningly made other pots that fit in the cooksets to carry other camp kitchen essentials - the choice of things to store in the cookset is just too much :-) If you are going to be cooking for more people (or just eat a lot) you can also get a bigger 'guide' coookset - I generally take that when Cooking for 2 on the dragonfly althought the regular set or trangia set do work fine for 2.

Some other points - do learn to light it properly and in a safe place until you master it. The dragonfly is much easier to prime correctly than an XGK/Whisperlite because you can proceed cautiously with the needle valve - stoves without these it is much easier to spurt too much fuel out in the first place so you get a much bigger priming burn than is necessary (or safe). Always have patience when priming, dont open the valve again until the priming flame starts to die - if in doubt let the priming flame go out and then open the valve. If the prime has worked you will get gas coming out, which you can safely light and it will form a nicve controlled flame, if the prime didn't work you will get raw fuel coming out (this is what causes the big fireball and oily smoke) - don't try to light out, let out just enough to try priming again, turn the valve off and then relight the wick. I have never known a stove need more than 2 prime burns to fully vapourise the fuel, but feel free to continue with the cautious approach next time. I have often lit the dragonfly in my tent following these procedures (in the doorway with door open and ready to hurl the thing if required - never have), after a while you will recognise when you have let too much fuel out to prime safely and will then put the stove outside to light (there is no going back unfortunately). For obvious reasons you want to develop this knowledge outside of the tent, most tents will burn to nothing in 20 seconds or less, sleeping bags too.

Stove base - Essential I would say. I got one in the US which the feet of the stove clip into and the bottle is attached to a bungee. Not only improves stability but makes the stove much easier to pick up and move, if say you need to light it outside and cook inside, or hurl it away from the tent. I really must get round to taking a photo, it wouldn't be hard to build one yourself....

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Re: Dragonfly or Omnifuel?

Post by sleepybubble » Fri Sep 24, 2010 4:06 pm

MikeB wrote:
sleepybubble wrote: On those long trips I mentioned I was sticking to clean coleman fuel, hence my zero services. I'm quite tight generally but its one thing I will spend a few extra quid on. My mate who is even tighter than me was running the whisperlite on 4* and unleaded, wich is why it was so much of a phaff, after about 4 days on any grade of petrol any of these multifuel stoves will need a damn good clean. Cleaning the stove means severely dirtying yourself and getting the oily sooty stuff off your clothes and hands in the backwoods is niegh on impossible.
Weird - I ran my W/lite on unleaded for the first 9 years with no mess at all, and no blockages and no problems. Yes, it would get sooty and mucky if you pre-heated with petrol, but if you use meths instead then that problem goes away so no mess, and stove was always clean after being used.

Accepting that unleaded isnt really the best fuel for these stoves, I now use Aspen 4T as a Coleman fuel alternative as its cheaper and less smelly than unleaded. It can be used to pre-heat with no mess, and I even use it in a Zippo.

Mike.
Maybe it was the 4* that was killing it, at that time getting unleaded in the states was difficult. I'll have to look out for Aspen4T as I am about to run out of Coleman fuel. I too used to use coleman in a Zippo :)

Mark

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Re: Dragonfly or Omnifuel?

Post by sleepybubble » Fri Sep 24, 2010 4:21 pm

Jim wrote: Stove base - Essential I would say. I got one in the US which the feet of the stove clip into and the bottle is attached to a bungee. Not only improves stability but makes the stove much easier to pick up and move, if say you need to light it outside and cook inside, or hurl it away from the tent. I really must get round to taking a photo, it wouldn't be hard to build one yourself....
If we are Myth busting.....

Stove base for a Dragonfly is not essential :) I have never used one, if I could't find level ground to cook on then some well selected stones or a bit of digging with a heel seems to suit. ( usual disclaimer about selecting stones which are from shoreline and prone to exploding due to water expansion under sudden heating of course).

I have cooked inside the fly of my tent, however I am dead against the idea of lighting a stove in the exit of a highly flamable death trap and would never ever advocate doing it. It really is a big no-no. Even with a common sense approach stuff can go wrong. I once set fire to a redundent dome tent as part of a safety demonstration,it was all but gone in 14 seconds, there is no time even for knifing your way out of the back, never mind opening another door zip etc.
Depends on the size of the tent of course but for the average size backpacking (shove it in a Kayak tent) it is a fairly high risk activity with any sort of stove.

I'm not saying you should not do it Jim, I'm just adding a counter to your inferred advice that it is ok to cook inside your porch. I know you did tell people to practice a lot before doing it, but its just plain safer not to.

Mark

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Re: Dragonfly or Omnifuel?

Post by Enray » Fri Sep 24, 2010 4:45 pm

Thanks again for the advice and the information. Actually I am a pretty experienced outdoorsman - 25 years plus leading groups into wild landscapes so all the comments about safety are just like the ones I hand out on a regular basis. I am also pretty used to various stoves and cooking methods but I have never owned an MSR or Primus, and now I have the means to buy one - I am keen to do so. This means that I will have a range of stoves at my disposal that I can choose from depending on the situation. Such luxury!!

I have been onto good old You Tube where there are a variety of films about the two stoves in question. Really it is coming down to personal choice because the differences between the two seem very slim to me - they both have their strong positive qualities.

It is good to see read the various points of view that have been offered which again proves how rich our combined experience is!!

Cheers,

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Re: Dragonfly or Omnifuel?^

Post by Ken_T » Mon Sep 27, 2010 2:10 pm

Hi,
A few comments, with any of the liquid fuel stoves with a needle valve, when the stove is shut down, it should be done with the main valve rather than the needle valve for 2 reasons:
1. Thermal expansion as the stove cools down the needle valve tightens on it's seat (at least with all model I have used), if this happens repeatedly a groove is worn in the needle & it does not seal properly, also the controlability of the stove is compromised.
2. It is then easy to seperate the stove from the pump without depressurising or spilling fuel. (I always depressurise the bottle during transport as that reduces the chance of leakage).

The con's I have come accros for the Dragonfly are:
1. The plastic pump is not as robust as the metal pumps.
2. The jet is easily damaged during removal because it is aluminium & is unscrewed using a srewdiver slot accross the jet.
3. It packs away as akit of parts & you have to be careful to make sure you pack them all.

The Con's I have found for the omnifuel is:
1. The connection between the valve & the fuel pipe is easily damaged by salt water. (I keep this joint covered in silicone grease & make sure it does not get wet)

Have you considered the Optimus Nova + ? I have not actually used this stove, but it would be worth checking, even if you reject it.
Ken

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Re: Dragonfly or Omnifuel?^

Post by Cadair » Mon Sep 27, 2010 8:33 pm

I have a Wisperlite International bought in 1986! Still going strong.
Volenti non fit injuria!

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Re: Dragonfly or Omnifuel?^

Post by Mark R » Mon Sep 27, 2010 10:13 pm

Nasty, messy, noisy, fiddly, relatively dangerous. Only necessary for overseas trips where meths or gas canisters not available; third world etc.
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Re: Dragonfly or Omnifuel?

Post by CONTADOR » Mon Sep 27, 2010 10:15 pm

sleepybubble wrote:
Enray wrote:Thanks Ed & Mark - really useful information and greatly appreciated. I have to say, before I posted this question I was erring towards the Primus stove, simply because it looked more robust and from what I read this seems to be the case (albeit only slightly). The aquisition of spares might be an issue for me if ever (or when) I head further afield but I guess if by then I anticipate what I might need, I could get these before hand.

All in all really good info and I hope this helps other forum readers.

Cheers,
Slight danger of veering OT here but I do think its worthwhile advice.

On those long trips I mentioned I was sticking to clean coleman fuel, hence my zero services. I'm quite tight generally but its one thing I will spend a few extra quid on. My mate who is even tighter than me was running the whisperlite on 4* and unleaded, wich is why it was so much of a phaff, after about 4 days on any grade of petrol any of these multifuel stoves will need a damn good clean. Cleaning the stove means severely dirtying yourself and getting the oily sooty stuff off your clothes and hands in the backwoods is niegh on impossible. The expense of clean fuel FAR outwieghs the mess and annoyance of constant servicing, pricking of jets, cleaning of fuel lines and looking like a grubby mechanic.
The whisperlite got to the point of being such a pain that we were only using it if we ran out of clean fuel. If I rerember correctly my mate eventually put it into the equivelent of an 'optio drawer' and bought himself a dragonfly (which has only been run on clean fuel since) and a pocket rocket, which is now his stove of preference.

Some decent pans are also a worthwhile investment, I use the MSR duralite ones and my old trangia kettle which fits into the center of the nest. You cannot beat non stick pans when camping.

A final little tip, if you decide to cook on an open fire or a badly performing whisperlite which is a bit smokey, then smear some neat washing up liquid on the bottom and sides of your pans first. When you come to clean them the smoke stains just fall off with the mearest of wipes. Which is far better than spending hours with a scourer or sand grandually reduing the thickness of your pans to get them clean again after your meal when you want to be sat with your feet up by the fire relaxing.

Mark
I've had my dragonfly running on unleaded for a year now and not had to clean it once. And it's been used for over a 1000miles of sea kayaking.
Why clean bottom of pans? Black absorbs heat...

sleepybubble
Posts: 465
Joined: Sat Mar 20, 2010 10:48 pm
Location: Isle of Lewis

Re: Dragonfly or Omnifuel?

Post by sleepybubble » Tue Sep 28, 2010 9:09 am

CONTADOR wrote: I've had my dragonfly running on unleaded for a year now and not had to clean it once. And it's been used for over a 1000miles of sea kayaking.
Why clean bottom of pans? Black absorbs heat...
Maybe it was the 4* then..... erm I would clean the bottom of my pans because it saves having to clean soot/smoke and gunk from the inside of my pans.I don't like eating petrol soot! Pans Nest inside each other you see.....

You've used your Dragonfly, to propel you along on a 1000 miles of Sea Kayaking. Cool thats a novel use for that big noisey jet turbine. :))

Mark

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