First post-Saying a big hello.

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Paddlesmacker
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First post-Saying a big hello.

Post by Paddlesmacker » Wed Sep 15, 2010 12:15 am

Hello all

I have just joined the ranks of the proper wobbly sea kayaking newbie, and thought I'd say hello to you all.

I've been paddling for 2 weeks now in my new North shore Atlantic RM, and loving every wet-sleeved mile of it. I'm getting out on the Nene around Oundle and Peterborough as often as I can, trying to learn the basics, before I start venturing further-I don't know anybody who is into this wallet emptying sport, and it would be good to meet some like-minded folk for some future paddles. In return, I can offer entertainment in the form of a bloody useless paddler that you can have a good laugh at- hopefully, this wobblyness won't last for long!
Desperate Measures kitted me out, they all seem like good guys and I'l keep dealing with them-I've been Impressed with my new stuff.
Im heavily into lightweight backpacking and fishing too, and I'm planning on getting to Scotland soon in my plastic fantastic for some beach camping on some sea lochs, bagging some peaks as I go.
I look forward to learning loads, seeing new places and paddling in a straight line. (I'm not using my skeg-I think this will force me to learn to paddle properly).

Happy Paddling, Pete.

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MikeB
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Re: First post-Saying a big hello.

Post by MikeB » Wed Sep 15, 2010 9:03 am

Hi Pete - welcome. I expect your skeg comment to draw some discussion.

Mike.

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Yakdiver
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Re: First post-Saying a big hello.

Post by Yakdiver » Wed Sep 15, 2010 9:47 am

Name Richard
Point 65n Sea Cruiser
Ocean Prowler

Bards
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Re: First post-Saying a big hello.

Post by Bards » Wed Sep 15, 2010 10:42 am

MikeB wrote:Hi Pete - welcome. I expect your skeg comment to draw some discussion.

Mike.

Yup - I'm going 'ring-side' for this one... ;-)

IMO there's something to be said for not complicating the early steps (and indeed later ones!) with too much 'how far should I deploy my skeg. Is it actually deploying at all or stuck', etc... when instead you can focus yourself on the importance of edging, asymmetrical paddling etc... depending on boat and conditions, of course...

Sounds like you have a 'compare and contrast for yourself' attitude which will serve you better than JUST following some protocol carved in stone, no matter how competent the Stonemason may be!!! All part of the 'exploration'...

A fellow wobbler,


Bards

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Ceegee
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Re: First post-Saying a big hello.

Post by Ceegee » Wed Sep 15, 2010 10:52 am

Paddlesmacker wrote:this wallet emptying sport,
Hi Pete, and welcome from me too.

It doesn't have to be this way (although theoretically the sky is the limit) - amazing what we started with in the 70's. Got away with with cheap and homemade kit. A cheap (LidL-style) wetsuit (you might want to cut the arms off to make a farmer john) and a cag and PFD will cover most immediate needs. A couple of dry bags/BDH containers and home-assembled first aid, repair kits and change of clothes. Cheapo-paddles as spares, home made tow rope & float, Lomo deck (Lomo are a cheap source of tons of good stuff, as are slightly pricier Reed), and a VHF (~£100 these days). 2nd hand is good too.

If you are paddling in company (as ideally you should be as a newbie) then a lot of the essential kit can be shared in the group.

You have some nice paddles nearby - avoid the Wash from Kings Lynn - Skeggness (boring mudflats) but Hunstanton to Cromer is cool. Watch out for breaking sand bars at Burnam, Well, Blakeney entrances and dumping surf from Blakeney-Cromer though (down to weather/tides really)

Cheers

Steve
Cheers,
Steve C. G.

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MikeB
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Re: First post-Saying a big hello.

Post by MikeB » Wed Sep 15, 2010 12:47 pm

Bards wrote:[
Sounds like you have a 'compare and contrast for yourself' attitude which will serve you better than JUST following some protocol carved in stone, no matter how competent the Stonemason may be!!! All part of the 'exploration'...
As part of your journey of self discovery, I commend this article to you.

It shoudl help in understanding why the wretched boat sometimes turns the way you want it to, when you want it to, and why it sometimes won't turn at all.

Enjoy.

Skegs are very useful.

Mike.

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Yakdiver
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Re: First post-Saying a big hello.

Post by Yakdiver » Wed Sep 15, 2010 1:17 pm

I was out on Monday playing with my skeg it was amazing when paddling across the River Hamble with a good force 3 + and a high spring tide how much difference it made even having it lowered about a ¼ of the way out. I suppose having a skeg and rudder is a bit like driving an automatic car........I have all three.
Name Richard
Point 65n Sea Cruiser
Ocean Prowler

Paddlesmacker
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Re: First post-Saying a big hello.

Post by Paddlesmacker » Wed Sep 15, 2010 1:39 pm

Thanks for your warm welcome and advice guys, ;)
Yakdiver wrote:Hi and welcome
this may help
http://www.sit-on-topkayaking.com/Artic ... raight.htm
It helps, cheers Yakdiver.
MikeB wrote:
Bards wrote:[
Sounds like you have a 'compare and contrast for yourself' attitude which will serve you better than JUST following some protocol carved in stone, no matter how competent the Stonemason may be!!! All part of the 'exploration'...
As part of your journey of self discovery, I commend this article to you.

It shoudl help in understanding why the wretched boat sometimes turns the way you want it to, when you want it to, and why it sometimes won't turn at all.

Enjoy.

Skegs are very useful.

Mike.
That link helps a lot too and explains quite a few things.
Ceegee wrote:
Paddlesmacker wrote:this wallet emptying sport,


Hi Pete, and welcome from me too.

It doesn't have to be this way (although theoretically the sky is the limit) - amazing what we started with in the 70's. Got away with with cheap and homemade kit. A cheap (LidL-style) wetsuit (you might want to cut the arms off to make a farmer john) and a cag and PFD will cover most immediate needs. A couple of dry bags/BDH containers and home-assembled first aid, repair kits and change of clothes. Cheapo-paddles as spares, home made tow rope & float, Lomo deck (Lomo are a cheap source of tons of good stuff, as are slightly pricier Reed), and a VHF (~£100 these days). 2nd hand is good too.

If you are paddling in company (as ideally you should be as a newbie) then a lot of the essential kit can be shared in the group.

You have some nice paddles nearby - avoid the Wash from Kings Lynn - Skeggness (boring mudflats) but Hunstanton to Cromer is cool. Watch out for breaking sand bars at Burnam, Well, Blakeney entrances and dumping surf from Blakeney-Cromer though (down to weather/tides really)

Cheers

Steve
I got kitted with Palm cag, pfd, neoprene deck and some neoprene shoes. I have been wearing fleece up 'til now and been toasty, but I suspect that the postman will be 'giving' me a Lomo drysuit before long-the weather is looking decidedly autumnal. I was wondering if the Lomo stuff is ok because its much lower priced than a lot of other gear, but your recomendation and a couple of other reviews I have read seem good. I have yet to sort a tow rope, radio and spare paddles. Out of all of these, I suspect the spare paddles are the most important. I carry all the drybags, spareclothing and first aid kit in my backpack already, so I guess these wont be too much of a problem.
Thanks Steve.

My biggest gripe at the moment (apart from wobbling/not steering properly) is being unable to get back out without dunking my foot. I capsized loads trying it the other day, I felt a right goon. :)

David A
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Re: First post-Saying a big hello.

Post by David A » Wed Sep 15, 2010 1:58 pm

Hi Pete, welcome to the forum. Congratulations on the choice of sea kayak. I also paddle a North Shore and it has always looked after me. The wobblyness will go away, after all it's not as though you’ve bought a Quest (only kidding Quest owners, only kidding)!!!
Bards wrote:Yup - I'm going 'ring-side' for this one... ;-)
MikeB wrote:I expect your skeg comment to draw some discussion.
Sitting on the fence are we?
It’s only my opinion: use the skeg when needed. This will save lot of frustration, pain, sweat and tears .Sea kayaking should be about enjoying the experience. Your paddling ability/technique will evolve, then you will enjoy it even more.
I have often heard it said that sea kayakers are an eccentric bunch of people. All paddle for different reason. I do expect that some paddlers enjoy this lifestyle activity through developing their paddling technique: a pure form of paddling without the use of a skeg. To these technically superior paddlers I pay homage to their ability and sado-masochism tendencies. I am not saying that they are any more eccentric than the rest of us!!

Big Wave Dave

chykensa
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Re: First post-Saying a big hello.

Post by chykensa » Wed Sep 15, 2010 8:58 pm

Hi Pete, a big welcome from my mates and me down in Cornwall. Welcome to the forum and I hope you find as much useful advice here as I have, it has already proved invaluable.

I've only been paddling just over a year, and in that time have read as much as I can about paddling technique, talked with others and tried out some ideas myself. I think the most important thing to remember at all times is ENJOY YOURSELF!!! You can read, discuss, and watch Youtube till the cows come home, but the only way you will evolve the techniques that work for you is to get out on the water and do lots of paddling. And that should be the fun part - experiment, fall in and swim, get cold and happy, and get huge satisfaction out of your sport.

I do most of my paddling around the Fal river in Cornwall, with some coastal when conditions are favourable for us. I use my skeg when I'm in a following wind (and sometimes when going into wind), but have recently aimed to paddle for at least 15 minutes at a time without. Obviously it needs to be up when leaving and arriving at a beach, slip or place of entry, and also if you need lots of manoeuvrability for rock-hopping etc.

As mentioned before, the wobbling, the zig-zag trajectory and general fear of any wave more than 6cm high will soon pass, and in the meantime you will pick up so much experience along the way.

Keep us posted on your progress, and there's lots of great paddling down here in Cornwall if you fancy a visit sometime!

Andy
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David A
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Re: First post-Saying a big hello.

Post by David A » Wed Sep 15, 2010 9:09 pm

Hi again Pete, when are you coming to Scotland. Are you coming on your own or with a group.

Big Wave Dave.

Paddlesmacker
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Re: First post-Saying a big hello.

Post by Paddlesmacker » Wed Sep 15, 2010 11:34 pm

Thanks for the advice Andy, I'm going to keep getting out as often as I can. I've done 10 miles on the map this afternoon which is probably nearer 20 if I acount for the zig-zagging. I have been to Cornwall many times, I try to get down every year at least once now. I will definitely be wobblin' your way before long.

David A wrote:Hi again Pete, when are you coming to Scotland. Are you coming on your own or with a group.

Big Wave Dave.
Hi Dave, Ill be on my own. I'm planning on getting up before the end of October at the latest, hopefully earlier. Im not sure where yet, Im thinking somewhere inland if I'm on my own, Lomond or loch Awe. I don't fancy getting to sea yet, Ive heard the waves go higher than 6cm out there! Scary stuff. I learnt to eskimo roll in school years ago, but I'm sure the years of beer drinking have scrubbed the grey matter of any ability to do it now. If I can crack the roll before then, Ill do a sea loch.

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