KAYAKER OFF ORKNEY RESCUED FROM THE WATER^

Places, technique, kayaks, safety, the sea...
User avatar
orkfay
Posts: 161
Joined: Fri May 22, 2009 7:53 pm
Location: Kirkwall, Orkney
Contact:

KAYAKER OFF ORKNEY RESCUED FROM THE WATER^

Post by orkfay » Mon Jan 18, 2010 4:59 pm

http://www.mcga.gov.uk/c4mca/mcga07-hom ... m=1&y=2010

Use of VHF resulted in a happy ending.
Although reported as local resident, it seems he was not known to either of local clubs.
Glad he was OK

fiona
Posts: 181
Joined: Thu Nov 02, 2006 10:00 pm
Location: Aberdeenshire

Re: KAYAKER OFF ORKNEY RESCUED FROM THE WATER

Post by fiona » Mon Jan 18, 2010 6:01 pm

He is a local resident. And I heard from his wife today that he's fine. Haven't heard any other details as yet - but thank goodness he had full safety equipment and was wearing appropriate clothing!

User avatar
MikeB
Posts: 7958
Joined: Tue Apr 29, 2003 9:44 pm
Location: Scotland

Re: KAYAKER OFF ORKNEY RESCUED FROM THE WATER

Post by MikeB » Mon Jan 18, 2010 6:43 pm

Good to hear he's ok - I'd seen something about this in todays Scotsmanwhere there was also a comment that a VHF had been used to issue a Mayday as well as the 999 call.

A spokeswoman from Shetland Coastguard said the helicopter had difficulty locating the man. "He was wearing a dark green life jacket and trousers which, against the sea, made him difficult to spot," she said

The benefits of the right gear - indeed! It would seem he was in the water for an hour.

Mike

User avatar
orkfay
Posts: 161
Joined: Fri May 22, 2009 7:53 pm
Location: Kirkwall, Orkney
Contact:

Re: KAYAKER OFF ORKNEY RESCUED FROM THE WATER

Post by orkfay » Mon Jan 18, 2010 7:02 pm

More news
http://news.stv.tv/scotland/north/15122 ... -rescuers/
Apparently the guy was in the water for 1h 45m!

Andybhoy
Posts: 99
Joined: Fri Jul 31, 2009 12:39 pm

Re: KAYAKER OFF ORKNEY RESCUED FROM THE WATER

Post by Andybhoy » Mon Jan 18, 2010 7:32 pm

A happy ending to a news story..It doesn't happen all that much these days. Watching the 6'o clock news can be worse than the Texas chainsaw massacre at times!!

'It would be fair to say that the casualty may owe his life to the vigilance of the skipper on the Amethyst and to wearing his lifejacket'

And to his dry suit which I'm assuming he was wearing. Which begs the question, how long will you last in a dry suite before hypothermia sets it, provided it doesn't leak of course?? I've always wondered, especially when I know paddlers who wear very little thermal clothing underneath due to overheating!

fiona
Posts: 181
Joined: Thu Nov 02, 2006 10:00 pm
Location: Aberdeenshire

Re: KAYAKER OFF ORKNEY RESCUED FROM THE WATER

Post by fiona » Mon Jan 18, 2010 7:43 pm

It really illustrates how important it is to have VHF, etc. on your person and not in the kayak. And flares if you are carrying them.

As far as I heard, Steve was actually coming ashore and was pulling his kayak up when he was swept back out to sea by a large wave.

User avatar
MikeB
Posts: 7958
Joined: Tue Apr 29, 2003 9:44 pm
Location: Scotland

Re: KAYAKER OFF ORKNEY RESCUED FROM THE WATER

Post by MikeB » Mon Jan 18, 2010 8:03 pm

Andybhoy wrote:And to his dry suit which I'm assuming he was wearing. Which begs the question, how long will you last in a dry suite before hypothermia sets it, provided it doesn't leak of course?? I've always wondered, especially when I know paddlers who wear very little thermal clothing underneath due to overheating!
Yes - a quandry - dressing for immersion would seem to mean wearing rather more than is comfortable to stop that overheating problem.

What DO people do? I know I'd not survive any length of time in the water wearing my usual combination of sallys and a cag, and in fact when I did take a swim a few years ago on the Solway in April, while we were "sorting me out", it was very interesting to note how difficult it became to do things after only about 15 mins in the water. We learnt a few lessons that day, and although I was never in any real danger (I could have easily swum to shore), the potential for multiple things to go wrong was clearly highlighted as he experienced the difficulty of rescuing a "big bloke" using a double!

The first of those learning points being what does the front paddler do when the double is being leaned at an angle to assist the swimmer back in his boat!!

If I'm wearing my drysuit, then the couple of layers of fleece certainly don't keep me warm for any significantly greater length of time although I do seem to get rather more time before things become "difficult" and my reactions start to slow down.

Mike.

User avatar
chris-uk
Posts: 961
Joined: Wed Oct 03, 2007 8:45 pm
Location: South Hams, Devon

Re: KAYAKER OFF ORKNEY RESCUED FROM THE WATER

Post by chris-uk » Mon Jan 18, 2010 8:49 pm

Firstly I'm really pleased the guy is okay.

Secondly, this really got me thinking and so I started looking through some academic papers. First the bad news, it appears that vigorous exercise reduces survival times for cold water immersion, which sucks 'cos we are generally busy paddling like duracel bunnies in conditions likely to cause a capsize http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6740792. That said it seems we don't stand at any real disadvantage by getting tipped out into turbulent seas http://cat.inist.fr/?aModele=afficheN&cpsidt=2440823.

Most importantly though, I think, is this paper, which shows that in 3degree water survival can occur for periods in excess of 6hrs if correct immersion clothing is worn (drysuit with correct insulating layers, although an incident is recorded of survival in these conditions where the undergarments were only shorts and a t-shirt!!!), but leakage of just half a litre of water can reduce the effectiveness of the suit by 30% http://www.ingentaconnect.com/search/do ... ext%2fhtml.

So I guess that if you have a watertight drysuit you can get away with wearing less underneath it, but, as the academics point out, there are many other factors to take into account as each individual will have varrying metabolisms, fat percentages etc.

Chris

User avatar
orkfay
Posts: 161
Joined: Fri May 22, 2009 7:53 pm
Location: Kirkwall, Orkney
Contact:

Re: KAYAKER OFF ORKNEY RESCUED FROM THE WATER

Post by orkfay » Mon Jan 18, 2010 9:32 pm

Although useful benchmarks, I do wonder about the validity of some of this research for waters around Orkney!
chris-uk wrote: ... That said it seems we don't stand at any real disadvantage by getting tipped out into turbulent seas http://cat.inist.fr/?aModele=afficheN&cpsidt=2440823 ...
Chris
"Six subjects who were each wearing a dry immersion suit system were immersed for 1 h in 16°C water in a number of different wave conditions, ranging from still water to 70 cm in height."
16C water temp - we can only dream ...
70cm waves ?turbulent

After a day of relatively little wind, MagicSeaweed reports 3.5' (105cm) swell and 8*C sea temperature at that location today
http://magicseaweed.com/Fisk-Helliar-Surf-Report/100/

Having had one prolonged immersion last year (25 min in early May with a 3mm longjohn wetsuit), my biggest concern about turbulence was about the effect on the parts drysuits don't cover - your face and airways. Hanging onto the back of a kayak in relatively rough conditions meant getting dunked completely quite a few times with some water ingestion/inhalation each time. That was certainly tiring ... and factors other than insulation would then affect hypothermia ...

User avatar
Jim
Posts: 13497
Joined: Sun Apr 21, 2002 2:14 pm
Location: Dumbarton

Re: KAYAKER OFF ORKNEY RESCUED FROM THE WATER

Post by Jim » Mon Jan 18, 2010 10:09 pm

70cm waves don't sound very big to me either, but often the more problematic conditions are the short higher frequency waves. You would tend to float up and down on a 5m wave, whilst 70cm waves just keep slapping you in the face.

For survival situations many lifejackets have a spray hood for exactly the reasons you mention, to maintain an air pocket for breathing and to keep cold water from slapping you in the face - really, it's not just namby pamby splashing in these situations but well loaded punches!

It's great news that the paddler is OK. this is another incident that shows how well prepared we can be, and how we really can help ourselves by having the right kit and using it as appropriate.

There are a good number of stories that show that having comms whether mobile phone or VHF has lead to successful rescue of kayakers even in relatively remote areas with a low density of boat traffic. Definitely worth thinking about next time I'm trying to decide whether or not to spend the money on a VHF!

User avatar
Ceegee
Posts: 942
Joined: Tue Nov 21, 2006 9:32 pm
Location: Mizen Head, Ireland (see above)

Re: KAYAKER OFF ORKNEY RESCUED FROM THE WATER

Post by Ceegee » Mon Jan 18, 2010 10:23 pm

Thank God it went well,

a few interesting points: seems that Steve was close to shore (if the photos during the interview are anything to go by). No mention of a dry suit, but I presume he was suitably dressed for the conditions - neo or drycag/salopettes if not a drysuit.

IMO, lessons to be learned:

#1 - do not get seperated from your boat - see also recent thread on boat colours.

#2 it is often impossible to swim even a short distance to shore in inclement conditions (i.e <100m if wind/tide are against you)

#3 even short immersions in suitable attire can result in loss of function. 1/2 hours+ rescue practice in winter wearing drysuit+thermals and I start to feel fatigued. MikeB is on the ball!

Steve, if you follow this forum, I'm sure a lot of people (myself included) would be glad to learn from you experience by way of a sober incident report - could have happened to any of us!I assume since you gave a very frank and candid STV interview, you wouldn't (and shouldn't) feel intimidated.

Cheers

Steve

P.S. BTW @ Chris-UK, Orkfay etc. Essentials of Sea Survival by Frank Golden and Michael Tipton is highly educational and an eye-opener. A lot of it is dedicated to long-term (liferaft) survival, but the drowning/near drowning and hypothermia physiology sections are worth the book alone.
Cheers,
Steve C. G.

fiona
Posts: 181
Joined: Thu Nov 02, 2006 10:00 pm
Location: Aberdeenshire

Re: KAYAKER OFF ORKNEY RESCUED FROM THE WATER

Post by fiona » Tue Jan 19, 2010 8:04 am

Ceegee wrote:Thank God it went well,
IMO, lessons to be learned:

#1 - do not get seperated from your boat - see also recent thread on boat colours.
Steve had actually landed when he was swept off the shore by a huge wave. So I'm not sure how he could have avoided being separated from his boat in this particular case. Although I totally agree that where possible you should stay with your boat - it certainly makes a much bigger shape for rescuers to spot. I also wonder how many people think about the colour of what they're wearing or just think about the colour of their boat colour (I have reflective patches on my BA but everything else is probably quite dark coloured). If you're separated from your boat then its colour becomes of secondary importance to the colour of what you're wearing.

I don't think Steve reads this forum (although I may be wrong) but I'll get a message passed on to him to ask him to have a look to see if he's willing to post so that others can learn from his experience.

The bit that stands out to me at the moment is the limitations of VHF. It was the 999 call which got through to the coastguard - not the mayday call which was only heard faintly by a local boat. That really made me think as I carry a VHF but not a mobile phone. Hopefully someone with more knowledge than me can advise us as to how we can best increase the chance of getting a mayday signal heard by the coastguard.

Graeme Seggie
Posts: 91
Joined: Thu Jul 02, 2009 10:08 am

Re: KAYAKER OFF ORKNEY RESCUED FROM THE WATER

Post by Graeme Seggie » Tue Jan 19, 2010 9:00 am

fiona wrote: I may be wrong) but I'll get a message passed on to him to ask him to have a look to see if he's willing to post so that others can learn from his experience.

The bit that stands out to me at the moment is the limitations of VHF. It was the 999 call which got through to the coastguard - not the mayday call which was only heard faintly by a local boat. That really made me think as I carry a VHF but not a mobile phone. Hopefully someone with more knowledge than me can advise us as to how we can best increase the chance of getting a mayday signal heard by the coastguard.
That's made me think of a change in locating stuff on my person. Currently my VHF is on my BA and my mobile is in a dry back in the day hatch with car keys but I may work on a way of keeping it in the BA too. I'm not sure though how I'd manage to make a call with a phone whilst bobbing about in the sea without the phone getting ruined by the wet hands and splashes from the sea before a call got out. Might need to look at some of those waterproof pouches that allow control through the material, does anyone know of any that are suitable for this? The only spanner in the works would be my phone is one of the folding types.

Could the faintness of the VHF be the fact he was so low in the water and frequently behind the waves mentioned?

Graeme,

User avatar
chris-uk
Posts: 961
Joined: Wed Oct 03, 2007 8:45 pm
Location: South Hams, Devon

Re: KAYAKER OFF ORKNEY RESCUED FROM THE WATER

Post by chris-uk » Tue Jan 19, 2010 9:35 am

Graeme Seggie wrote:I'm not sure though how I'd manage to make a call with a phone whilst bobbing about in the sea without the phone getting ruined by the wet hands and splashes from the sea before a call got out. Might need to look at some of those waterproof pouches that allow control through the material, does anyone know of any that are suitable for this? The only spanner in the works would be my phone is one of the folding types.
You can get bags for the folding phones, aquapac make one. You should find it in most online retailers http://aswatersportsequipment.co.uk/pro ... cts_id=860

Chris

Graeme Seggie
Posts: 91
Joined: Thu Jul 02, 2009 10:08 am

Re: KAYAKER OFF ORKNEY RESCUED FROM THE WATER

Post by Graeme Seggie » Tue Jan 19, 2010 10:18 am

Thanks Chris.

User avatar
Ceegee
Posts: 942
Joined: Tue Nov 21, 2006 9:32 pm
Location: Mizen Head, Ireland (see above)

Re: KAYAKER OFF ORKNEY RESCUED FROM THE WATER

Post by Ceegee » Tue Jan 19, 2010 11:51 am

fiona wrote: Steve had actually landed when he was swept off the shore by a huge wave
This is the sort of detail that gets missed in initial reports, so your comments are spot on. There are invariably a number of incidents like this each year on the west coast of Ireland, invariably rock fishermen or walkers (i.e. no immersion clothing or safety equipment), usually not locals, and sadly mostly fatal under the circumstances, e.g. this sad story.

Just goes to show, even well-equipped and trained - going into the water off the shore does not mean you can make it the few meters back again!

Steve
Cheers,
Steve C. G.

User avatar
orkfay
Posts: 161
Joined: Fri May 22, 2009 7:53 pm
Location: Kirkwall, Orkney
Contact:

Re: KAYAKER OFF ORKNEY RESCUED FROM THE WATER

Post by orkfay » Tue Jan 19, 2010 12:10 pm

Ceegee wrote:Thank God it went well,
Essentials of Sea Survival by Frank Golden and Michael Tipton is highly educational and an eye-opener. A lot of it is dedicated to long-term (liferaft) survival, but the drowning/near drowning and hypothermia physiology sections are worth the book alone.
Thanks
Sounds useful - now on order from amazon!
both as a kayaker and as GP/lifeboat medical advisor to Kirkwall LB

Seedy Paddler
Posts: 363
Joined: Thu Nov 02, 2006 11:30 pm
Location: Aberdeen
Contact:

Re: KAYAKER OFF ORKNEY RESCUED FROM THE WATER

Post by Seedy Paddler » Tue Jan 19, 2010 12:10 pm

Reminder that VHF is a Line of Sight system, the Radio horizon (in miles) is calculated as approximately = square root (1.5 x Af) Where Af is the height of the Antenna in feet.

So broadcast sitting in a kayak and you may have circa 2miles, broadcast whilst swimming and the radio horizon is about 0.8mile. This may also be impacted by surface and wave motion.

Even with a small fishing boat Antenna height is liable to be circa 40-50 feet so radio horizon around 8.5miles.

So it really requires a fairly local station to provide the get out of jail card...

johnb
Posts: 487
Joined: Wed Sep 12, 2007 12:49 pm
Location: Rainow, Cheshire

Re: KAYAKER OFF ORKNEY RESCUED FROM THE WATER

Post by johnb » Tue Jan 19, 2010 1:02 pm

So do GSM phone signals bend better?.......

User avatar
Jim
Posts: 13497
Joined: Sun Apr 21, 2002 2:14 pm
Location: Dumbarton

Re: KAYAKER OFF ORKNEY RESCUED FROM THE WATER

Post by Jim » Tue Jan 19, 2010 1:04 pm

Flip, slide or touchscreen phones are all going to be very difficult to use through a waterproof bag, may be worth investing in an old fashioned brick with big push buttons on the front just for kayaking?

My phone has pretty much given up the ghost and I have been considering a PDA type phone as a replacement - I have already ruled out the above types for other reasons but I am now wondering if even a keyboard PDA phone is going to be usable through an aquapac with cold fingers, they keys look pretty small and there are lots of them!

I might try and pick up an old (refurbished or trade in) brick to carry when kayaking whether I go for the PDA phone or not - at the moment I am borrowing a spare from work which seems OK if a bit big. The company criteria for phones are that they are not flip or slide (because they break too easily) and that they have big keys and a decent sized screen so we can use them whilst out on survey. They also need to be robust and relatively cheap because they will end up in a boilersuit pocket along with other stuff. Basically the same criteria are worth applying when choosing a kayaking phone.....

VHF will have very limited range when in the water as already mentioned, but a Mayday is not just for the coastguard, all vessels should pay attention to them. Hopefully you will eventually raise a fishing boat or yacht and they will relay the Mayday to other vessels within their range, and the coastguard if they can.

Surely mobile phone technology is also line of sight, I guess they have proven so useful because there is a good network of antennae usually on hills providing fairly constant coverage of inshore waters even when there are no vessels in the area?

Canoe-Cowal
Posts: 98
Joined: Sun May 24, 2009 2:00 pm

Re: KAYAKER OFF ORKNEY RESCUED FROM THE WATER

Post by Canoe-Cowal » Tue Jan 19, 2010 1:06 pm

Andybhoy wrote:Which begs the question, how long will you last in a dry suite before hypothermia sets it, provided it doesn't leak of course?? I've always wondered, especially when I know paddlers who wear very little thermal clothing underneath due to overheating!
Douglas Wilcox had an American extraction which told you with ages etc. From memory once over 50 your time is curtailed significantly.

If Douglas reads this he may reprint it or attach article

J

User avatar
Jim
Posts: 13497
Joined: Sun Apr 21, 2002 2:14 pm
Location: Dumbarton

Re: KAYAKER OFF ORKNEY RESCUED FROM THE WATER

Post by Jim » Tue Jan 19, 2010 1:07 pm

johnb wrote:So do GSM phone signals bend better?.......
Antennae are higher so you are not trying to broadcast around the horizon so soon.

CG VHF masts are also much higher than vessels, but there are relatively few compared to the number of GSM 'cells'.

Incayak
Posts: 127
Joined: Mon Sep 05, 2005 12:42 pm
Location: London

Re: KAYAKER OFF ORKNEY RESCUED FROM THE WATER

Post by Incayak » Tue Jan 19, 2010 1:59 pm

Regarding emergency use of mobile phones under life threatening situations, here's a simple to use mobile for cold fingers and a dulled brain - not cheap though at £100.

http://www.matobmobile.co.uk/index.php? ... ig_buttons

User avatar
journeyman
Posts: 473
Joined: Sun Feb 11, 2007 9:57 pm
Location: South Wales
Contact:

Re: KAYAKER OFF ORKNEY RESCUED FROM THE WATER

Post by journeyman » Tue Jan 19, 2010 2:04 pm

fiona wrote: The bit that stands out to me at the moment is the limitations of VHF. It was the 999 call which got through to the coastguard - not the mayday call which was only heard faintly by a local boat. That really made me think as I carry a VHF but not a mobile phone. Hopefully someone with more knowledge than me can advise us as to how we can best increase the chance of getting a mayday signal heard by the coastguard.
The VHF radio has many positive advantages and uses as a rescue and communication aid, but one should not overlook it's limitations - as a hand held device it does not have the range of a fixed radio set for a number of reasons - and bobbing up and down in the troughs of waves will have an effect on its range. Also there are some areas which would normally have excellent coverage by the coastguard, but by being in close to the base of cliffs your transmissions may not be picked up - several areas around the S Wales coast this is certainly true. This is due to the line of sight nature of VHF. One solution to the rescue situation I've been seriously considering is a Personal Location Beacon (PLB), for paddling in remote areas with difficult VHF areas (which may not have mobile reception either). Prices have dropped dramatically over recent years (just over £200 now - there was a thread on this recently on the forum). This kit does not suffer from the same line of sight limitation as a hand held VHF and the GPS ones give your positional info. It is just another piece of kit in the arsenal to consider. Steve was really lucky to have his mobile and be able to use it.

I'm intrigued to understand why the chopper reported such difficulty finding him from the air as they have DF equipment on board, and the VHF signal going skyward from his hand held would presumably be used with the DF equipment to help pinpoint him (once they were in the general location). This is after all one of the "advantages" of a VHF radio.
Ceegee wrote:Essentials of Sea Survival by Frank Golden and Michael Tipton is highly educational and an eye-opener.
Totally agree about it being an interesting eye-opener - not really a bedtime read - although on second thoughts it might put you to sleep as it is a bit heavy going. Certainly lets you know why you don't want to be in the water.

User avatar
Jim
Posts: 13497
Joined: Sun Apr 21, 2002 2:14 pm
Location: Dumbarton

Re: KAYAKER OFF ORKNEY RESCUED FROM THE WATER

Post by Jim » Tue Jan 19, 2010 2:17 pm

journeyman wrote: I'm intrigued to understand why the chopper reported such difficulty finding him from the air as they have DF equipment on board, and the VHF signal going skyward from his hand held would presumably be used with the DF equipment to help pinpoint him (once they were in the general location). This is after all one of the "advantages" of a VHF radio.
Being cold kills batteries as well as people, it may be that by the time the helo got close his transmit power was way down on account of the batteries being cold....

Dave28
Posts: 212
Joined: Sat Feb 16, 2008 5:50 pm
Location: Plymouth

Re: KAYAKER OFF ORKNEY RESCUED FROM THE WATER

Post by Dave28 » Tue Jan 19, 2010 4:37 pm

I have a cheapo flip phone in a flip bag (with oodles of silica gel or whatever) and regularly use it in the bag, to report position or "safe ashore". I haven't had to try it in the water yet, though it has gone through a capsize or two with me.

Having had my small "key" bag leak - happily while the car keys weren't in it - I've had a non electronic key cut for the car door, so that I can leave the keys with the immobiliser chip safely in the dry.

User avatar
Mark R
Posts: 24087
Joined: Thu Jan 10, 2002 6:17 pm
Location: Dorset
Contact:

Re: KAYAKER OFF ORKNEY RESCUED FROM THE WATER

Post by Mark R » Tue Jan 19, 2010 5:36 pm

We did not manage to raise the Coastguard (or anyone) on VHF even one single time, between John O'Groats and North Ronaldsay, over three weeks in Orkney.
Mark Rainsley
FACEBOOK

User avatar
orkfay
Posts: 161
Joined: Fri May 22, 2009 7:53 pm
Location: Kirkwall, Orkney
Contact:

Re: KAYAKER OFF ORKNEY RESCUED FROM THE WATER

Post by orkfay » Wed Jan 20, 2010 10:40 am

Mark R wrote:We did not manage to raise the Coastguard (or anyone) on VHF even one single time, between John O'Groats and North Ronaldsay, over three weeks in Orkney.
What handset were you using?

We've not generally found a problem when in sight of Wideford Hill (where CG aerial is located).
Close under the cliffs around Hoy and West Mainland, there will be a problem.
In the event of a MayDay, other passing traffic is likely to pick up and relay.

I have little faith in may ability to operate a Mobile when OOB
however these "simple" big button mobiles in an aquapac sound like a possibility

User avatar
Steen Johansen
Posts: 62
Joined: Fri Jun 19, 2009 7:34 am
Location: Denmark

Re: KAYAKER OFF ORKNEY RESCUED FROM THE WATER

Post by Steen Johansen » Wed Jan 20, 2010 11:45 am

Graeme Seggie wrote: Might need to look at some of those waterproof pouches that allow control through the material, does anyone know of any that are suitable for this?
It is easy to operate the phone through different covers. It is much more difficult to hear what is said to you on the phone when it is windy.
I would go for a phone with a good microphone and a good speaker but I cannot find any.

I mainly find my VHF useful for communication with other crafts in visible range.

happychappy
Posts: 1
Joined: Wed Jan 20, 2010 2:42 pm

Re: KAYAKER OFF ORKNEY RESCUED FROM THE WATER

Post by happychappy » Wed Jan 20, 2010 4:58 pm

Hi all i have just been reading all the interesting discussions regarding the lucky kayaker. I was on the kirkwall lifeboat during the search and we located him using a DF radio (direction finding radio) we asked him to count down from 10 to 1, while he was counting down we could locate the direction from which he was broadcasting. He could see us but we had problems seeing him due to the slight swell. We would have struggled finding him with a mobile phone and with only 30mins of daylight left the VHF was a saver.

Post Reply