Capella/Tempest/OT Cayuga ??

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Scots_Charles_River
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Capella/Tempest/OT Cayuga ??

Post by Scots_Charles_River »

Tested a Capella the other day.Good fitting boat tippy to begin with.

Are the other two WS Tempest or an OT Cayuga 16 better stability ?
Looking for a good overnighter boat, no big crossings etc planned.

OT looks good. Own an OT open canoe at the moment and trust that.

Nick

Owen
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Post by Owen »

A friend has a WS tempest, really impressed. The deck lay-out and fittings, the cockpit and seat fit, and the overall shape of the hull are all great; streets ahead of the Capella. The closest thing in plastic to a composite boat. And only a grand.

Scots_Charles_River
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Post by Scots_Charles_River »

Is it more stable than the capella ?

Nick

DominiqueS
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Post by DominiqueS »

Would suggest you double check the quality of the plastic and of the equipment though. P&H and Valley use a much stronger plastic than WS with consequences for hull rigidity, denting propensity, oil caning and long term hull shape.

Stability: difficult to answer as it would depend on your own weight/morphology and which Capella (166, 160) and which Tempest (170, 165) you compare. Only you can really tell, by trying them. You may also want to try (same price range) a plastic Valley Avocet and an Aquanaut LV. Beside how they "feel" to you, check the quality of their outfitting, especially hatch covers and rims and bulkhead construction, as this will affect how waterproof your hatches will remain over time.

Scots_Charles_River
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Post by Scots_Charles_River »

6ft and 14/2stone so the capella rm 166 did fit well, not tight.

Yes there are 1layer and 3 layer hulls.

Nick

DominiqueS
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Post by DominiqueS »

- Among the Valley boats, the Avocet might be too small - look at the Aquanaut LV? Or maybe even the Nordkapp-Enthusiast (which is said to be a close cousin to the glass Nordkapp LV).

- Tempest, Cayuga: well, try and compare them with the others, you should be able to feel the differences. Some families of hulls have been there for a long time for a reason.

- Don't underestimate the impact of build quality at purchase time if you intend to keep your boat a long time - saving now might prove illusory later. There is something to be said for the smaller independent manufacturers (like Valley and P&H) who depend on direct client satisfaction. Where consolidations have occurred (WS, OT, Necky, Dagger etc... are all part of large outdoor equipment groups) the advertising budgets become a bigger sales driver, the boats are more mass produced and the temptation to built more "economically" to maximize profitability may become more pressing. In the end, look closely and caveat emptor...

- Boat stability: this is quite subjective - there is no other way I know than trying the boats yourself. What feels twitchy to you today could well become very natural after a few paddles, a bit like a few weeks after your very first bike ride... While some boats may be way too much for you at the risk of being discouraging, a sound boat (some hulls are downright hopeless) that now would be only marginally uncomfortable could well prove very satisfactory in the long run. On the other hand, if you buy a very stable barge now, you will still have a very stable barge in 10 years...

- The limitation of any advice is that no one can try the boats for you, or know how you will feel in them - as a result giving any definitive recommendation is impossible, or fraudulent. Plus it would take away the fun of trying and comparing as many boats as possible! Good luck to you in your search.

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Windowshade
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Post by Windowshade »

The Wilderness Systems Tempest comes in three sizes: 165 (16 feet 6 inches), 170 (17 feet) and 180 (18 feet). The larger boats are also slightly wider and deeper. The 165 is for smaller paddlers/day use. The 170 can be used for day paddling or light touring. The 180 is for larger paddlers/touring.

The Tempest is a semi-hard chined kayak. As such, as you tilt it, the stability "firms up" (as it does, for example, in an NDK Romany).

The Capella also comes in various sizes, from 16 to 17 feet long. The Capella is a soft chined kayak. As such, its stability does not "firm up" in the clear way that it does in a semi-hard chined or hard chined kayak. The Capella is no less seaworthy, but has a different "feel".

If you're looking for a kayak for day paddling (rather than touring), consider the NDK Romany. It is maneuverable, seaworthy & stable. Also, for the first time, it is available either in composite (usually fibreglass) or plastic.

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captaingrassholm
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Post by captaingrassholm »

Scots_Charles_River wrote:Is it more stable than the capella ?

Nick
Yes, very good secondary stability - excellent boat for rough water and miles ahead of the Capella in my opinion
Are we there yet?

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