Very long distance kayak trips

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pjjones00
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Very long distance kayak trips

Post by pjjones00 »

I am looking at doing an adventure in a few years time. I want to do a kayak trip lasting 2-3 months. Something that is pretty much wilderness, 1-2 week paddle to the next town, wild camping along the way. It could be anywhere in the world. The sort of trip that I have seen so far is the inside passage in Alaska something like that. Has anyone done a trip similar or has knowledge of a trip similar.

NatMad
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Re: Very long distance kayak trips

Post by NatMad »

1-2 weeks without towns? I think that that will be a bit harder to find.
According to my knowledge Inside passage has quite a lot of settlements quite close together. So does the Alaskan peninsula.

I guess you can try North - West passage, circumnavigation of Greenland, north east coast of Russia or other fairly inhospitable places as anything that is just a bit inhabitable has people living there.

Circumnavigation of Brittain without stopping in every town? Could be pretty wild in terms of camping, too.

If we are talking 1-2 weeks average paddling, then distance is about 300 - 500 km, but if we are talking 1-2 weeks of bad weather, then that could be anything from 0km onwards, so almost any place would be suitable, provided you won’t stop in the middle of a city.

Natalie

Tom the Dane
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Re: Very long distance kayak trips

Post by Tom the Dane »

Southern coast of Chile, west and northwest coast of Australia, eastcoast of Greenland or a circumnavigation of Iceland. All rather remote places!! Or Antarctica!!!!

Sincerely

Thomas

Chris Bolton
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Re: Very long distance kayak trips

Post by Chris Bolton »

East coast of Greenland, as suggested above, will certainly meet your target for wilderness, and won't have the political issues of Russia. You may not find enough towns (well, villages) if you want one every 1-2 weeks. The sea ice typically clears at the end of June, and it should be possible to paddle into September - the main limitation is often that the snow has melted and there's no fresh water.

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MYSSAK
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Re: Very long distance kayak trips

Post by MYSSAK »

Tom the Dane wrote:
Thu Oct 04, 2018 8:59 pm
Southern coast of Chile, west and northwest coast of Australia, eastcoast of Greenland or a circumnavigation of Iceland. All rather remote places!! Or Antarctica!!!!

Sincerely

Thomas
I would say Iceland is quite civilised and populated island. Remoteness there is more about weather and sea conditions rather than distances. Even in most remote places there you are never more than two good weather paddling days from closest people.

Michal

Boatsie
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Re: Very long distance kayak trips

Post by Boatsie »

Wilderness isn't as spectacular as reads of other places on Earth yet pretty and nice.
Adelaide, south Australia.
3 weeks could easily be enjoyed paddling down a portion
of the Murray river. Camp spots galore. Small towns exist; supplies.
Out the heads and along the coast. Southern ocean. Heavy landings onto soft sand.
Victor harbour could be another resupply.
Whales during season. Beaches further south tend to be more heavy landings and secluded from many visitors other than fishermen and surfers.
Back stairs passage. A tidal race about 10km wide. Pick the go time well.
Either cross to Kangaroo island, another lovely place or go around the corner at Cape Jarvis.
Note.. Wouldn't enter back stairs passage during a heavy northerly, I've seen that and it's big.
From cape Jarvis to outer harbour is usually with a dominant wind. Cliffs, nude beach, lots of beaches and cliffs.
Whole trip is maybe 200km by car but 1000-2000km by sea kayaks.
I'd be interested in a couple of years.
I have spare boats but none to suit such at moment.
If interested I can let you know..

Mostly warm climate. Most would enjoy comfortable light pack such as a quality sleeping bag and a hoochie (light weight small area tarp).

River current with hence distance increase. Timing of tides would do same.

A bro.

Just thought a bit more.. We have a 14 foot ex military duck with parachute tie downs that is registable as a 1 tonne carry unit that can be used with a 4metre white water kayak as its life boat to carry all stores. Just needs a few repairs such as an engine service and a leaky valve fix. All cruisy down under.
Dangers are the water conditions. Snakes tend to be non bothersome as do the sharks. Spiders exist but again, they tend to hide.

Leaving it to read with you guys/girls that similarly love the ocean. Searching gum tree from Sydney/Melbourne /Adelaide would usually locate a seaworthy vessel to use and resell later.
Bass strait exists too.

Boatsie
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Re: Very long distance kayak trips

Post by Boatsie »

Whoops.. I misread the quest you on.
Southern Australia might suit.. Warmer weather to many other parts of our world.

Bass strait, Tasmania circumnavigation? Thick wilderness there. A gaol without walls, a thick forest that the best trackers could cut path at not many 100metres per day. It'd be remote. About a 20minute lifespan if you fall in the water.
There is info on the internet.

Western end of southern Australia is pretty remote too. You'd need water. Big tuna farms near Port Lincoln means big concentrations of feed and some pretty big fellows swimming around there. The great white sharks are said to have an eastern family and a western family. I think the big sharks at the western end often swim between south Africa and port Lincoln.
Off port Lincoln is Neptune island and many other islands. Loads of sharks. 1 of the islands has a natural cove. A skinny yet with depth entrance. Usually 2 bull New Zealand fur seals stand guard. Inside are 100s or 1000s of fur seal pups. Never get between a bull and the water.
Kangaroo island is the biggest of the islands. The locals of south Australia had been canoeing longer than 20000 years. Due to isolation, Kangaroo island animals evolved slightly different than mainland animals. Example. This area is too cold with Tiger snakes yet K. I. homes some; they are black to absorb more energy unlike the colours on Australias eastern coast.
200 years ago, white man found this place. Left 2 pigs, 1 cock and 2 hens upon K. I. Such that they could return and have game to eat. Nowadays. Many wild pigs on K. I. The waterways are hazardous, Backstairs passage is a fierce tidal race during a 3 metre swell and a northerly gail. During better conditions yet still not that great, our 24 foot trailer sailed with the iron sail going flat out didn't match her current!
Tassies probably worse but if you want remote, it's there and many have crossed upon Bass Strait.

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PeterG
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Re: Very long distance kayak trips

Post by PeterG »

You don't have to go far or cover a lot of ground for a longer trip...
http://paddleswithananasacuta.blogspot. ... dling.html
Although you pass shops more frequently the reality of lone paddling with a loaded boat is that you can only easily shop over low water, letting the boat strand and then leaving as the tide rises again. This greatly reduces shopping opportunities. I work on every 2-3 weeks. Then there is the enforced chance for detailed exploration of uninhabited islands or coast given by bad weather.

Over the years I've paddled all the west coast of Scotland and Islands on extended trips. I've been to West Greenland a couple of times, but with friends and would say it is not the best place to be on your own with the essentially unpredictable ice. Also the problem of wrestling your boat high above the sea in case of a wave during the night, or just landing on steep granite slabs. However, settlement is scarce and the landscape beautiful with plenty of sea and coast for a couple of months 'off grid'.

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