Greenland paddle size

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e-wan
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Greenland paddle size

Post by e-wan » Fri Feb 13, 2015 8:03 pm

I am considering a new slightly longer Greenland paddle, my current Anglesey stick is 221 cm long. I was on a course with Cheri Peri and Turner Wilson last summer were Turner suggested he thought I could do with a longer paddle and their website suggests a way of estimating paddle length by combining your arm span with the distance between your elbow and index finger tip.(http://www.kayakways.net/kayaksandpaddl ... e-fitting/)

My difficulty is
Current paddle = 221cm
Estimated length of new paddle = 234.5cm
Longest commercially available carbon Greenland paddle =225cm

I had been hoping to get a two-part Carbon paddle but cannot seem to find any long enough. I don’t think I am exceptionally tall (6 ft 1”).

Am I a little odd thinking about getting a paddle that long? or might I be better to get a new wooden paddle made rather than opting for a slightly shorter than ideal Carbon paddle.

If I do get a wooden paddle, is there a good way to protect the ends from scratches, I had thought about painting it with epoxy.

Thanks

Ewan

Mac50L
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Re: Greenland paddle size

Post by Mac50L » Sat Feb 14, 2015 3:04 am

As someone campaigning against too long paddles and using 220 or shorter GPs, I'd suggest what you have is long enough.

Making one, I use a 20 mm thick plank and waste half of what a 2x4 bulk of timber carver would waste. Tips have kwila which is commonly used for veranda decking and hitting rocks tends to leave grooves in the rocks.

See for my method -

https://sites.google.com/site/kayakamf/ ... nd-paddles

nicholas
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Re: Greenland paddle size

Post by nicholas » Sat Feb 14, 2015 6:53 am

I have just started making my own sticks.
I am six three and find 220 to be about right for me.
Even when using euros I ended up with 210 being my preferred length.
I am deffinately an advocate of shorter paddles.

Curph
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Re: Greenland paddle size

Post by Curph » Sat Feb 14, 2015 7:55 am

I'm 6'2" with what my wife describes as monkey arms and giraffe legs. According to the anthropomorphic guide lines my "ideal" Greenland paddle length should be about 235 cm with maximum blade width of 9.5 cm. I've found that to be just too large for anything other than short sprints. I suspect that the Inuit body shape is sufficiently different to my non-Inuit long limbs and short body shape that the anthropomorphic guidelines suggest overly long paddles.

There is plenty of room to improve my fitness, but after switching to a shorter narrower paddle I can paddle for longer at the same speed and feel more comfortable at the end of a 3 hour paddle.

I'm now using two paddles 225 cm and 215 cm both with blades a max width of 8.5 cm. One advantage to making your own is that you can cheaply experiment with different lengths and widths, although Kajaksport have released the Inuksuk which is a carbon Greenland paddle with wing paddle style length adjustment that you can change while paddling.

http://www.kajaksport.fi/products/paddle/ks-inuksuk

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Mikebelluk
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Re: Greenland paddle size

Post by Mikebelluk » Sat Feb 14, 2015 9:50 am

I can build a carbon paddle up to 234cm from my moulds, only problem is that the loom length increases, as blade dimensions stay the same. If you have wide shoulders longer length should fit you though. My own paddles are at 218cm and 228cm to give a bit of variety.

I can do various layups from full carbon (stiff + light), Carbon/hybrid, and cedar. 2 piece ones, cost £40 extra as the carbon tube needed is expensive.

Also a new paddle, the 'Scrapper' which is a carbon/glass hybrid the difference being the carbon layers are made from offcuts which would otherwise be thrown away, but actually make the blades stronger.

Check them out http://cedarboats.co.uk/Cedar_Boats_Eur ... ddles.html

Wood blades tips can be protected with fine glass cloth and epoxy, epoxy on its own won't help much though.

e-wan
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Re: Greenland paddle size

Post by e-wan » Sat Feb 14, 2015 8:17 pm

Thanks, I think it sounds like 235 might turn out to be too long. I might go for somewhere in between perhaps 228. I'm going to try and have a paddle with narrow (8 cm wide) blades so think I could therefore manage something a little longer than my current paddle.

Ewan

Mac50L
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Re: Greenland paddle size

Post by Mac50L » Sat Feb 14, 2015 9:22 pm

Try a slightly longer and a shorter. At $20 (10 pound?) per paddle it shouldn't break the bank. Make sure the edges are sharp, or reasonably so. Your weight with a good plank of WRC should be about 750 - 850 grams.

scameron
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Re: Greenland paddle size

Post by scameron » Sun Feb 15, 2015 11:01 am

don't get yourself too hung up about overall lengths. comfort between hand width and loom girth is probably more important specially if you've got a paddle with shouldered blades
I've made about six sticks varying between 2200 and 2320 and in use I cant feel much difference, i'm about 6 foot 2 with arms just a bit improportionally long!
best of luck

e-wan
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Re: Greenland paddle size

Post by e-wan » Sun Feb 15, 2015 11:51 am

scameron wrote:don't get yourself too hung up about overall lengths. comfort between hand width and loom girth is probably more important specially if you've got a paddle with shouldered blades
I've made about six sticks varying between 2200 and 2320 and in use I cant feel much difference, I'm about 6 foot 2 with arms just a bit improportionally long!
best of luck
for the loom, is it best just to go with the beam of your kayak or to consider your own shoulder width or other measurements. I'm probably going to go for a paddle with a gradual transition between loom and blades rather than obvious shoulders as I find this makes it easier to transfer to extended blade strokes. what are the advantages of having a more pronounced transition between shoulder and loom?

Thanks

Ewan

nicholas
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Re: Greenland paddle size

Post by nicholas » Fri Mar 27, 2015 12:20 pm

I have been making my own paddles and have found I prefere no shoulder. But I also probably paddle with my hands to far apart , they are definitely outside the line of my shoulders.
I would be interested to hear peoples opinion on my hand position.

dalriada
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Re: Greenland paddle size

Post by dalriada » Sat Mar 28, 2015 5:46 pm

I have 2 paddles, made by Mike Bell, which are almost identical - with the exception of the loom width. On the original paddle I slightly overestimated the width, and found that because I prefer to have my hands at a point where the loom widens into the blade (t he paddles are shoulder less), my hand position felt stretched. Mike made my second paddle with a loom which is about in inch shorter, and this paddle feels completely different & much more natural in use.

My own thoughts are that having a loom width & thickness which fits your body is probably more important than the length.

Mac50L
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Re: Greenland paddle size

Post by Mac50L » Tue Mar 31, 2015 10:19 pm

I like a shoulder as it gives a placement but no problems moving a hand out for an extended sweep stroke. Loom - fists against the hips and the paddle shoulder starting on the outside of the little fingers. The paddle is held with thumb and fore finger on the loom and the rest of the fingers on the shoulder and blade. This seems to give the same width of grip as would be on a "normal" paddle (Wing or Euro).

I make my looms rectangular. The fore finger, bent at the second knuckle makes a right angle and this is bent over the rounded edge of the rectangular loom. I'd suggest doing that and if you don't like it then take more timber off until you get what you like. Maybe get a 6" long bit of wood and try different shapes.

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