Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

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Another Shrike in Australia

Post by nickcrowhurst »

Received this morning from Brian in Australia, number 262:

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A Vember in Romania

Post by nickcrowhurst »

This morning from Lucian,in Romania:
"Vember is my first kayak. Love at first sight."
Now that makes my heart sing.

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Vembers at play

Post by nickcrowhurst »

A Vember Expedition and a Vember paddling together in the USA:


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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by Beryl »

Well there are eyes to dot and tees to cross but with such good weather the ‘Lockdown Shrike’ is spending some quality time on the water rather than the bench....


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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by nickcrowhurst »

Well done, She's a beauty!
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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by PlymouthDamo »

Beryl wrote:
Sat Aug 01, 2020 8:12 pm
Well there are eyes to dot and tees to cross but with such good weather the ‘Lockdown Shrike’ is spending some quality time on the water rather than the bench....

That looks like a pristine job you've done there Paul. It's hard to judge with the boat pointing at the camera, but is it a rolling Shrike with Ocean Cockpit? It looks like it's a lot lower volume than standard. The black bits look really smart - I've done the cockpit rim on two of my boats with tinted epoxy and it's held up really well, and looks way better than leaving it in wood. I'd be interested to hear how well the tinted epoxy lasts on the hull when you start giving it grief - if it's much more robust than black paint then that would be a no-brainer for anyone who doesn't want to leave theirs in wood.

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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by Beryl »

Damian, thanks, but I don’t do pristine: it takes too much maintenance! My ideal is, looks good if you don’t get too close. On that basis it’s a success. The deck is just three coats of tung oil, any mark/scuffs just disappear with the swipe of an oily rag.
The hull is ten percent tint but put on very scarcely(120g per coat) this comes out matt which, one, hides blemishes well and two, makes the boat look small.... it’s got the ocean cockpit but only 10mm off the hull, so almost a standard Shrike Too.
As for durability the deck is just a less submerged Greenland paddle and the epoxy should be okay as there shouldn’t be too much sun exposure I’m thinking. I’ve not been particularly careful on the slipways and rocks in my four outings so far so, although early days, it does look promising. I think touching up will be easier than with paint.
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Hand rolling a Shrike with fireworks

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Stefanos from Greece - launch day

Post by nickcrowhurst »

Stefanos says:
I loved the boat, although I have to learn a lot new things.
She is fast and steady at the route, has good behaviour in 30-50 cm of waves.

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We made a small daily trip to some islets with my family and the work of 17 months was forgotten in seconds.
And you can see that my four years old daughter is easily paddling:

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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by Stuwar »

Hi, I am considering building a Shrike and have a very specific question. Will my size 12 UK feet fit? I have seen an example when the deck was modified by adding blisters to accommodate toes but I’d rather not do that! Hopefully someone with size 12’s can advise.

Cheers,

Stuart

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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by nickcrowhurst »

Stuart, one of the main features of the Shrike is that you can choose the height of the topsides, the curve in the foredeck, the size and type of cockpit, and all aspects of the design, apart from the underwater shape of the hull. Plymouthdamo knows plenty about the particular subject. IIRC he has size 11 feet, and I'm sure he will contribute. You can check the required adjustments in advance by printing out the shape of the foot bulkhead, and standing on it with your heels together and your toes splayed. That's how I designed the prototype Shrike.
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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by PlymouthDamo »

Stuwar wrote:
Wed Aug 26, 2020 9:20 pm
Hopefully someone with size 12’s can advise.
nickcrowhurst wrote:
Wed Aug 26, 2020 10:45 pm
Plymouthdamo knows plenty about the particular subject. IIRC he has size 11 feet, and I'm sure he will contribute.
Actually, I'm lumbered with size 12s... And yes, the last boat I built was a rolling Shrike with the deck radically lowered (by 6cm) so is a bit of a nearly-sunk razor-blade of a boat. That's probably the one you've seen with the foot pods added - I had to do this after I ended up with chronic pain in my big toes, which I was initially convinced was gout! The foot pods have completely resolved the issue, and I'm very happy with an even weirder looking boat.

However - the other two Crowhurst boats I've built were a Shrike and a Vember, both to the standard size shown in Nick's build manuals. I can confirm that they're like aircraft hangars inside - loads of room for size 12 feet.

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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by Stuwar »

Many thanks for both your replies - and so fast too! I am greatly encouraged, especially that I won’t need to mod the deck. My current boat, a Cape Ann Expedition weighs around 25 kg and aside from the fact that it is a bit large and buoyant for day paddles I’m getting a bit long in the tooth to be humphing it about!

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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by Beryl »

“I’m getting a bit long in the tooth to be humphing it about!”

I’m a 71 year old twelve stone weakling and regularly carry my Shrike in one hand fifty yards to the slipway. Having such a light boat makes a huge difference in so many ways. I would go as far as to say it will probably extend your kayaking career.
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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by PlymouthDamo »

Stuwar wrote:
Thu Aug 27, 2020 9:38 am
...it is a bit large and buoyant for day paddles...
If you're interested in a lower volume boat, you might want to consider lowering the deck from the standard Shrike dimensions. I find my standard Shrike is perfectly manageable, even in very windy conditions without any ballast. However, my lowered rolling Shrike is an absolute joy to paddle in wind - it's so low in the water that it's practically sunk, which means gale-force winds can't touch it. Last week, we were out at sea in Storm Ellen and, although I was fighting for every centimetre of progress into wind, I was able to turn across wind for the downwind surf home without any drama whatsoever, despite having no skeg.

However... the main problem for a lanky person in a lowered Shrike is finding room for your knees. The standard Shrike has a curve across the front deck which can be adjusted by increasing/decreasing the radius of this curve. However, a lanky person in a lowered boat will want their knees to be splayed out and touching either side of the boat. Therefore, no matter how much you increase the curve of the deck, you'll never get any more room for your knees because the curved deck has to sit on the port and starboard hull walls. If you lower your hull, you'll have less knee room. The solution to this is to use a different design of deck with a 'goalpost' shaped section across your knees rather than a curve. If you do decide to go ahead with a lowered Shrike, I can give you more detail on how to do this. (If you stick with a standard Shrike, my previous comment about it being an aircraft hangar still stands - you'll have plenty of room.)

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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by Stuwar »

If you're interested in a lower volume boat,
I think the standard Shrike will give me the volume I’m looking for. I have been paddling Bigfoot since 2008 mostly on day paddles and have coped so far. However, there is no doubt in my mind that in her empty state she rides quite high and a recent paddle with a quartering sea I was struggling and felt pretty uncomfortable. I don’t regret building her - I’ve had a fair few paddle camping excursions over the years and she has swallowed up enormous amounts of gear! But I think it’s time for change and when I saw the Shrike the sleek shape appealed immediately and I went from a maybe to a definite to build one. I’m curr3ntly in “due diligence” phase so thanks for the comments and offer of help.

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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by rockhopper »

I was just also reading about the Petrel Play and wondered if anyone has made either of the boats out of Medite Trycoya which is a special water stable MDF used for external projects used as an alternative to marine ply
http://www.chilterntimber.co.uk/product ... -x-1220mm/

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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by Chris Bolton »

From the link, the thinnest Medite Trycoya is 6mm, which is thicker than the ply, and will be heavy and too stiff to bend to the right shape. I suspect the shape is also dependent on the way ply (in my experience) bends more across the surface grain than along it, while MDC is isotropic (symmetrical).

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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by mcgruff »

I suspect (without any evidence to back me up) that the networks of wood fibres in plywood would create a much stronger structure than wood dust held together with glue.
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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by Spikeedog »

Debatable . . . ?

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Andy from Sussex U.K

Post by nickcrowhurst »

Andy from Sussex, UK has sent details of his newly completed, and very pretty, Shrike:
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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by PlymouthDamo »



This is an experiment at trying to get a YouTube video to show on the forum. I've recently bought one of those mouthpiece holders for my camera and I was trying to get some more dynamic footage of these boats rather than the usual flat-water shots. If it works, keep an eye out for news reports of an old fella with a camera in his gob being washed ashore after failed attempts to surf the Brittany ferry bow wave etc.

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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by Stuwar »

Superb! This is really useful to me and helps confirm that my decision to build one of these beautiful boats is sound. Starting to feel impatient!

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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by Spikeedog »

That is a fantastic video. You can see exactly what you're looking at and what your doing. Love the mickey mouse ears too. Many thanks.

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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by PlymouthDamo »

Thanks Stuwar and Spikeedog. I'm really impressed with the mouth-mount for the camera - being able to quickly bung it in your gob so it's pointing where you're looking is a no-brainer when you want to keep your hands on the paddle. The only thing I'm less than impressed with is the fish-eye lens on GoPro-type cameras. You're certain that your death-defying footage is going to be worthy of an awful soft-rock soundtrack on YouTube, but then you discover the fisheye lens has made it look like a reasonably pleasant day on the local pond. I'm kicking myself because we went out in Storm Ellen last week, where even the fisheye lens wouldn't have been able to cover up the howling wind and the sea-spray, only to discover I'd left the bloody thing running after my last outing and flattened the battery...

And I know what you mean Stuwar: when I built my first Shrike, all I'd seen were photos of them looking all nicely polished, so I had a vague feeling I was going to end up with some kind of museum-piece for taking out on quiet Sunday river paddles. As I've gradually become less precious about scratching mine, I've come to appreciate that wobbly boats are a doddle to paddle in swell.

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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by Stuwar »

This photo from 12 years ago shows the amount of freeboard - something I didn’t really appreciate until recently. That and the practically zero rocker makes it a bit of a beast in any kind of following or quartering swell. Surfing is fun but scary as the bow soon buries and hanging on to your line is let’s say, interesting!


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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by Philknight90 »

Hi.
Am part way through a shrike build and looking for some 8mm fibreglass sleeving for making maroske fittings. My best bet on ebay / amazon seems to have a silane binder - is this ok for epoxy resin?? Failing that, can anyone advise on a supplier?
Many thanks.
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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by Chris Bolton »

I have never heard of silane binder and my first thought was that it was binder as used in CSM. That holds the fibres in place until you wet it out, and then dissolves in the resin so that you can manipulate the mat. CSM bound with PVA emulsion doesn't work with epoxy, you need to use powder bound CSM (you probably know that). From a bit of Googling, it appears that silane binder is a different thing altogether, and is designed to help the glass bond to the resin, and it does work with epoxy. So it probably is OK, but I'd check with the supplier, they should know.

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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by PlymouthDamo »

Stuwar wrote:
Sat Aug 29, 2020 2:52 am
This photo from 12 years ago shows the amount of freeboard - something I didn’t really appreciate until recently. That and the practically zero rocker makes it a bit of a beast in any kind of following or quartering swell. Surfing is fun but scary as the bow soon buries and hanging on to your line is let’s say, interesting!
What model of boat is the 'Bigfoot?' It looks beautifully made, but a totally different concept to the Shrike - i.e. yours is maximising waterline length and therefore maximising straight-line speed. My rolling Shrike also loves to bury it's bow when you are going down a steep wave, so you have to throw your weight back and hope it pops back up in time not to lose the wave. It will be good to build a boat which is significantly different to what you've already got. When I built my Vembex, I'd effectively duplicated what I already had with my high-volume Shrike, so I ended up cutting that one up and making a 3-piece out of it so that it wasn't completely redundant.

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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by Stuwar »

It is the Cape Ann Expedition from http://www.oneoceankayaks.com/ It’s not the easiest site to navigate but theres a lot of information there. She took approx. 6 months of 2 hours per evening most weekdays and was launched on a sleaty March morning in 2008. My excitement was tinged with fear as I perched her atop my Vauxhall Astra for the one and a half drive to Elie in Fife! Despite wanting to build a Shrike I don’t regret my original choice of boat for a moment as I have had 12 years of fun and adventure including week long camping trips and a couple of runs on the annual Tay Descent. But you are right, I’m definitely looking forward to paddling a different design.

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