Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by nickcrowhurst »

Oisin's Shrike at the Irish Sea Kayak Symposium in Kenmare last weekend:

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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by powderpark »

Greetings,

I'm continuing from the first part of this long post. Thanks for your patience in advance.

Bulkhead area
After finishing the glassing and sanding works I painted the sections which are close to double-bulkheads with graphite epoxy paint. The amount of graphite powder is around %10 by weight. I intended to obtain a slippery surface in these hard-to-reach areas and notice structural damages which may develop in time, by using a flashlight. The smooth texture may also let me feel the tiny cracks by touching them.

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I epoxied two arched parts to increase the gluing area of the deck panel over the double bulkheads. They are exactly the same shape and roughly 15 mm in width. Other bulkheads too have similar gluing surfaces, made by 12 x 12 mm battens. The deck panels press against these surfaces and ease obtaining watertight compartments.

Glueing the deck panels
I first installed the front section of the deck and before this, I bent the 4 mm thick stiff plywood using hot water and some straps & battens. Once its shape conformed to the sheer lines, I used nails and lots of plywood biscuits and glued the panel by applying the necessary amount of pressure. Installation of the Marosked fittings and painting of the reverse side of the panel with epoxy has been done prior to the nailing. I have used a type of sealant to glue the Maroske fittings to the plywood.


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Since the plywood I could find was 4 mm thick, prior to installation of the deck I used hot water and several ropes, etc. to force the plywood to conform to the final shape. This worked great but during the actual gluing, I couldn't rely on putting weights over the front deck panel to press against sheer clamps so I cut several rectangular parts to distribute the pressure when I nailed the deck panel to the sheer clamps.

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This is how I nailed the front deck panel to the sheer clamps. Of course, the nails are leaving their marks on the deck panel but they are tiny and barely noticeable. My side panels were lowered 25 mm from the original shrike and the radius of the masik was lowered to 50 cm compared to the original Shrike masa ik with 38 cm radius

Cutting the kayak
As I’ve finished the connector details and installed the deck panels, it was time to cut the kayak into three pieces. I used a thin Japanese saw and carefully cut over meticulously calculated lines which also have been marked with a sharp utility knife to prevent an accidental breakage due to the stress on the panels. I’ve put the kayak over some trestles and cut carefully. Cutting might be easier with the help of a second person since the weight of the parts might prematurely break the plywood along the cut line. In order to insert the blade of the saw, I had already cut a ~ 15 cm long section of the side pbeforeior to gluing the deck panels, which greatly simplified the insertion of the saw blade, between the double bulkheads. After the cut, lately noticed that the front part is 15 cm longer than the mid-section while the reispart was just the correct size. I should place the foot bulkhead 15 cm awaytoatum in order to obtain three equal parts. Not a very big problem for this time but this could be avoided with careful planning.


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I cut the kayak without any help from a friend so paid great attention not to break the plywood accidentally during the final stages of the cut. Put it on a pair of saw horses and inserted the Japanese saw from the slit which I had previously cut to one of the side panels. It took half an hour to cut it but could have been much quicker if the silicon hot glue blobs hadn't clogged the saw and required cleaning in between.

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After I cut the kayak, some light sanding through the cut line was still needed. The sawing operation wasted a few millimeters totally from the kayak's original length but did not affect the fairness of the sheer line. Separating the double bulkheads with blobs of hot silicon glue turned out to be a bad idea. In another 3-piece kayak, I glued small plywood shims in between using a very simple glue but this also turned out to be a bad idea as well. Maybe there are much better methods I failed to think of and apply to keep the bulkheads parallel to each other.

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After cutting the kayak I used a scale to see the weight of the individual pieces. The centerpiece containing the cockpit exceeds the 5000 gr limit of the scale so I couldn't weigh it with this method but the front and back parts are around 4 kg each. I then weighed the kayak using another scale and found the total weight was around 17.5 kg

Cockpit details
After steam-bending the cockpit rim, I dry-fitted this pabefore clamps prior to gluing. The upper part was also cut and glued to the riser followed by some coarse sanding to ease the glassing. I have kept the coaming's width and height at a minimum. Just high enough to let a spray skirt fit and not so high to increase the chance of cracking upon my weight during re-entry and exit. Even after glassing a 4 mm thick plywood is not very strong. I have then glassed this section and sanded and painted it with graphite epoxy.

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I first dry-fitted the steam-bent cockpit riser to the kayak and made sure that fit was OK. With some CA glue temporarily glued it before filleting it with epoxy. The side profile was drawn and marked with a pencil and using a block plane I reduced its height to the bare minimum to accept the spray skirt and not to rise more than enough from the deck, to make it difficult during re-entry to the kayak.

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The rest of the operation was much simpler. I temporarily glued the coaming with CA glue and then epoxied the gap between the riser and top to form a U channel. Since this gap would be the contact surface for the bungee cord of the spray skirt and coaming, a very tidy smooth surface was needed. I failed to put a very clean fillet here so this resulted in some tedious sanding to correct.

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I painted the cockpit coaming with graphite-epoxy only for cosmetic purposes as if it is made of something other than plywood.

Transportation & storage
I wanted to see the practicality of putting the kayak inside a hatchback car. After folding the rear seats It was possible, nevertheless, transportation inside the car was not the primary motivation for the three-sectioned kayak since it was also car-topable. Taking the kayak to an apartment using elevators and storing it in a room corner was particularly important.

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Here is the first time I put the kayak into a hatchback car. I usually carry the kayak on top of the car on the roof but it is nice to have this option in case you don't want to carry something this big on top of the car or will park your car in a shopping mall garage etc or leave unattended at the streets with the kayak inside.

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On my way to test the kayak during her maiden voyage, I again put the kayak after folding the rear seats and also noticed there was plenty of space left for a second kayak of this size. Two kayakers plus all their gear could fit in a hatchback car like this and travel economically with such an arrangement. Meanwhile, this 3-piece kayak of course can be transported as a single piece on top of the car, and putting it inside a car was not the chief motivation for me. The primary reason for having a 3-piece kayak was to store it in-house when I don't use it and can not find a proper place to store it nearby.


Finishing touches
To varnish the kayak, I improvised a simple hanger using two-by-fours. Using an electric spray gun I applied two coats of polyurethane varnish to protect against UV. My deck rigging is very simple I have not used bungee cords but used non-stretching 6 mm ropes instead. Later I may enhance the rigging and add some more ropes to the deck for added safety. The back support is also very simple, shaped from two layers of rubber-cemented 75 mm thick EVA foam. There is no seat, only a 4 mm thick EVA sheet in the cockpit floor, to keep the center of gravity low, this foam adds some protection against cold water and is comfortable enough for paddling for only a couple of hours. However, after first paddling with the kayak, I concluded that I needed a seat solution to make the kayak more comfortable since after paddling a couple of hours the cockpit was not comfortable for my size and weight. The seat should not raise the center of gravity more than a couple of centimeters and probably only compensate for the deep-v section at the center which needs to be supported. Also, the 4 mm thick EVA blocks at the cheek plates seemed a little narrow for me, they squeezed me maybe more than required. I may completely peel them off or at least reduce their thickness to 1 mm as a solution.

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I first hung the sections of the kayak as above but this did not help as much as I imagined. Varnishing using an electric spray gun was not as easy or effective as I had planned. The polyurethane varnish suspended in my workshop for at least a couple of hours, created sticky surfaces around and polluted everything. Also, I failed to set the output volume of the spray gun correctly and ended up with some varnish runs on the surface. Later I took the parts outside the workshop and continued this task outdoors.

Installing the foot braces
I am not a fan of foot braces since they add weight, complexity, and cost to a kayak but for another three-piece kayak of a friend, I equated the individual pieces by moving the foot bulkhead by 15 cm towards the bow, now it was not possible to step on the bulkhead as before. I used M6 stainless bolts and big washers to weld four of them to fasten the foot braces to the side panels. This operation required some more steps but I wanted to make the bolt heads invisible from outside and didn't want to drill 4 holes to the side panels.

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These plastic foot braces may not be very high quality so if they fail in time, it may be still possible to renew them or switch to an alternative solution. I purchased them from AliExpress and while positioning them within the cockpit, I used masking tape to keep them in the correct position. The simpler method should be positioning the foot bulkhead at the correct distance so that you may press your feet against it and not bring unnecessary clutter & cost to the kayak.

Deck rigging
There are four lines of non-elastic ropes in front of the cockpit opening on the deck. There are two Maroske fittings that guide a bungee cord and a wooden ball to ease the insertion of the spare paddle at the bow. I have drilled two holes to the bow and stern to tie ropes for either carrying the kayak or towing / being towed which is quite unlikely according to my past experiences. In time, I will add other lines and try to find some practical methods of making the required fasteners flush with the deck panels if possible.

3d printed parts
We have copied and modified existing Maroske fitting & skeg slider designs and a friend of mine printed them using PETG filaments. The result was satisfactory but of course, can be improved in the future. You can download and examine these parts from https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:6252263 and https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:6193421 Please note that these are not the final versions and this is a work in progress.

Carving a Greenland paddle
I have also made a couple of Greenland paddles to use with this kayak and for my friends who have built them themselves. After transferring the top + side contour outlines from a plywood template, the rough shape was cut using a band saw. The cost-effective choice of wood was Aious has a density of around 380 kg cubic meters and is usually knot-free. Being not as strong as western red cedar, the cost per paddle is around $15 per paddle, including the two-by-four required plus the cost of band saw cutting in a carpentry shop. I have made a center finder to mark the center lines on all four faces with a sharpie, which greatly helps to obtain symmetry during the actual shaping with a block plane and spokeshave. It takes around 1 to 1.5 hours to carve a paddle at a relaxed pace. After some sanding and painting with protective oil (I have used Rubio Monocoat plus 2c, a two-component product to add some durability to softwood) the paddle is ready to be used after curing. Below is a short video to show one of the paddles:



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I have laser-cut this center finder and added some small bearings to roll over the edges with less stiction. A sharpie is poked through the center hole and effortlessly marks the centerline, quite useful, especially for cases where the width changes along the length of the object.

Just before varnishing the kayak, I decided to wash it with tap water to get rid of the dust and dirt of previous months' endless sanding. The weather was warm so everything dried in a couple of hours and now I’m satisfied with the cleanness of the surface.
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Maiden Voyage
After several setbacks and other building projects, I’ve finally found a chance to test the kayak. A friend (also a Shrike builder) kindly recorded the maiden voyage. I have uploaded a short summary to show the kayak launch. You may watch this 1-minute video if you want to see what it looked like: https://www.youtube.com/shorts/2AmXzRsUrSE
We paddled a couple of hours on the calm (which is quite rare) waters of the Black Sea in beautiful Autumn weather. We haven’t observed any noticeable difference between the two kayaks, except the three-piece was maybe 1½ kg heavier due to double bulkheads and connector hardware.

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Conclusion
I probably could not describe all the critical points during this long post but I hope I have given some idea. Shrike is a beautiful kayak and this project added unnecessary complexity to the original design. Anyhow, what is done is done and in the future, I can make other mistakes without repeating these :=)
I finally want to thank all the people who provided help during the build and answered my questions. So far everything looks OK with this 3-piece kayak and the rest is testing it through time and see if I would encounter any problems related to my choices or workmanship.
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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by nickcrowhurst »

powderpark, many thanks for your excellent posts. Your skill is obvious, and your commentary and photos will be of great interest to those considering a 3-part construction. Well done!
Best wishes, from Nick of CNC Kayaks
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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by nickcrowhurst »

From Hikolay in Bulgaria:
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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by nickcrowhurst »

From Sape in The Netherlands comes Shrike #525 :
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A winter project?

Post by nickcrowhurst »

A winter project?
Have you considered building a Vember as your winter project, and been put off by the cost of the timber, which has soared over the last few years? I reckoned that a Vember Tandem for the DW and me, would be a good project . Then I saw that the price of the timber strips, whether cove and bead or plain rectangular, was well over £700 just for a standard Vember, let alone a beamier Tandem.
I’ve been looking for alternatives, and eventually found a sawmill that sells 6” x1” (145 x 19 mm finished) UK-grown cedar boards, planed all round up to 4.8 metres in length.https://www.ruby-group.co.uk/products/p ... 329139263
The weight per meter cubed is the same as Western Red Cedar at 370 kg. There are an average of 17 knots on each 4.8 m board that I purchased. I reckoned that four boards would be ample for the Tandem, allowing for 40% wastage. Delivery is free for all orders over £100, except for some postcodes listed on the website, including some parts of Scotland, for which the delivery cost will be calculated. Tuffnell’s is the usual delivery company.

The timber is machined after it is ordered, and delivery time is 2 to 4 weeks. The cost of each board is £37.39 including VAT and delivery, for a total of £149.56 . I guessed that three boards might be sufficient, but added one extra in case I was wildly out in the calculations, and perhaps I could also use the cedar for the sheer clamps. Our boards arrived yesterday:
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and this morning we cut one board:

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We created 93 metres of strips, in lengths from 4.8m to 800 mm, having broken out any knots that interfered with smoothly bending the strip, while retaining any knots that were purely cosmetic. This calculates at 40p per metre of cedar strip. Three boards should be sufficient for a Vember, and four for the Tandem. I'll keep this thread updated on progress and to report any errors in my calculations. We are very pleased with the timber, and the staff at Ruby are a pleasure to deal with. I spoke to Ryan and Nikki.
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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by nickcrowhurst »

Further to the above post, we always cut strips 4.5 mm thick, rather than 6mm, which used to be standard. The professionals (e.g Nick Schade and Laughing Loon) now use 4.5 mm. The strips are merely to separate the two skins of glass cloth, so as to form an I-beam. One can use foam sheets, but that's no cheaper, and I prefer to use wood, and a more complex form structure is required for foam.
We cut the strips on a cheap "site saw", (£110), which I've used for decades, but one can run a hand held circular saw along the static boards, with the cut set to 4.5 mm wide. This has the advantage of only requiring 5 metres of length of cutting area. Cutting outdoors on a dry day is, of course, an option. Here's a site saw from Toolstation:
https://www.toolstation.com/einhell-250 ... lsrc=aw.ds
The cedar boards have a moisture content of 10 to 20%, rapidly falling and becoming lighter in our basement.
As Uffa Fox, the greatest UK small craft designer of the 20th century, stated, the only good place for weight is on a steam roller.
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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by DavidDeWitt »

Recently I saw a YouTube video (https://youtube.com/shorts/sUhoRRZqw_E? ... PBZWPvPpR0) by Nick Schade where he had set up his table saw with 4 thin kerf Diablo blades separated by 3/16” spacers so that he could rip 4 strips at a time. I thought this looked like a great idea to reduce the time required to rip strips for a Vember. Nick was using an auto feeder so I am not positive it will work without one but might be worth a try
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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by fergus_finn »

Very interesting post about the Uk grown cedar. Massive saving ! However what I also got put out of that is that you do not put the bead and cove profile on the strip. Is that correct ? Definitely another saving as it eliminates another machining task but is it ok to build a strip planked boat without the profile ?
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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by nickcrowhurst »

Fergus, cove and bead is not necessary, and ,for example, neither Nick Schade nor Laughing Loon now use it. One just uses a small block plane to make the required bevel on the underside of each strip as it is laid in position. Clamp one end of the strip at the bow, bend it into position form 2. If it shows an external gap, lift it up, plane the inner edge, and retry. When content, staple or clamp to form 1 and go onto the next. I was surprised to find it straightforward after i had used cove and bead on my first Vember.
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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by nickcrowhurst »

We'll soon be cutting the 4th and final board. Lessons learned so far:
This should not be one's first rodeo with a saw bench. Precision is required. PPE is necessary: A cartridge mask is good, as is connection to a vacuum device to contain sawdust. I used my normal reading glasses, as misting up of goggles must be avoided in this potentially dangerous task.
Arrange to cut the UK cedar strips as soon as possible after delivery as the moisture content will rapidly reduce from 20%, and the planks could warp. This is true even with the very expensive Western Red Cedar which I've cut for a Vember in the USA.
With the UK cedar we produce 20 strips per plank. Because there are 20 knots average on each plank, only one or two strips are full length. This is not a problem, as it's easier to handle and butt-join shorter lengths. With the Vember Tandem I hope to use three pieces, but I could accept four. This is an experiment.
Choosing the correct edge to start cutting is important. If the edges are not dead straight, start at the convex curved edge. The other edge will be concave, and more difficult to cut a consistent 4.5mm. I suspect that a handheld circular saw (AKA Skilsaw) might be easier, but mine is not a good enough tool for that. Slow your feed rate when a knot approaches. One knot shattered and a one cm cube whacked my glasses with sufficient force to rebound 2 metres back up the plank.
If it becomes more difficult to maintain an even width of cut, the edge may have become unusable as the errors increase. Turning the board over may be easier, if not ideal. I've even resorted to snapping a line down the edge and hand-planing with a long jackplane to create a new edge, and this was with the USA knot-free timber.
I chose the longest planks at 4.8 m. This gives the best chance of avoiding knots and creating long useable strips. An assistant is a great help, as would be 4 or more trestles or roller stands.
The test of the timber will, of course, be when we start to use the strips.
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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by PlymouthDamo »

Given the huge increase in the price of timber, it will be a big deal if you can make this UK-grown cedar work. Apart from finding a cheaper source of timber than the Western Red Cedar or Pawlonia that we've been using, the other interesting thing will be seeing how your method for cutting it down into strips evolves. I also wonder if it's the sort of job that someone without the necessary kit could give to a small joinery to do and still be economically viable?

My Vember was made with Pawlonia and came in very light. However, Pawlonia is particularly susceptible to gouges, so I have to be careful not to hit submerged rocks, and I'd have been happy to accept a bit more weight for a more robust wood. So I wonder whether something a bit cheaper-but-heavier, like pine, would do the job?

But of course the main thing here is for you to get on and get this tandem Vember finished... There are a few of us down here that will be queueing up to test it out. I've never paddled a tandem before, and the obvious challenge would be trying to roll the thing - which I've heard is a bit of a teamwork exercise, but could be fun (providing you don't finish it so quickly that we're still in winter.)
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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by ChrisJK »

Is the home grown cedar of a similar weight to the WRC?
Perhaps a silly question but Is it possible to make a Vember using strips of 3 or 4mm marine ply? Has anyone tried?
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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by nickcrowhurst »

ChrisJK, look up this page to my post of 5 days ago: "The weight per meter cubed is the same as Western Red Cedar at 370 kg."
Using plywood as strips would expose the edge grain, especially on the turn of the bilges during fairing of the hull, and cost the same as UK cedar. It would be ugly.
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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by Paul-C »

Thanks for the information Nick. I've always thought that it would be more economical to cut my own strips if/when I make a strip built boat. And I'd wondered whether or not home grown cedar was feasible, with it's predominance of knots.

I don't have the machinery to do the job at the moment, but the savings would offset the cost of buying a saw. From what I've picked up elsewhere a bandsaw might be a safer (but possibly slower and more expensive) alternative to a table saw. I'm struggling to envisage how one would safely cut the last few strips using a hand held circular saw (once the piece being cut becomes narrow to clamp to a work surface).

I do fancy building a Vember sometime. But in the meantime I still have a tortured ply canoe project to start. The material have been waiting in the garage since I finished my Shrike 2 years ago!
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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by Chris Bolton »

I'm struggling to envisage how one would safely cut the last few strips using a hand held circular saw
I'd temporarily fix it to the side of a big enough plank to handle safely. Using something like water soluble glue, hot melt glue, lace fishing line through small holes 2mm in, etc.
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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by simonballantine »

If you don't have a table saw then it is quite straightforward to cut cedar strips from planed 150mm*19mm cedar planks with a normal hand-held circular saw. I put a new super-thin blade on mine to minimise wasting the cedar.
I screwed a 1.2m length of 19mm thick plank to a table top and then screwed my Skill saw to the plank ie: the plank sandwiched between the saw bed and the table - with the plank edge carefully aligned to be parallel with the saw blade and 5mm away from the blade. I then fed the cedar plank thro to get 19mm*5mm laths.
Using either this method or using a table saw it is difficult to keep the cedar pressed tight against the plank for the full extent of the cut and the slightest misalignment means the lath will be sawn too thin. I used a glassfibre sail batten fixed to the tabletop in such a way that it is bent to press against the cedar plank - pushing it hard against the saw guide. i found that this worked best with quite a lot of pressure pushing against the plank.
I think you can but a proprietary product to do this, but a sail batten and some screws worked well for me.
And practice with some cheap scrap wood first!
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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by Paul-C »

That's really useful advice Simon. There's always a solution somewhere if you put your mind to it!
I think the proprietary device is called a feather board. But I like the idea of cheap and simple!
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Progress on the Vember Tandem

Post by nickcrowhurst »

The UK cedar is proving to be an excellent timber for the task. It's stiff enough to curve nicely between the forms, set at 330mm apart for the Tandem. It looks as if I will have sufficient strips from the four original planks, but I will report back when I've completed the hull. Anyone considering building a Vember variant should be aware that getting to the stage of having completed just the hull is a long process, at least 50 hours of work to create the plans, make the temporary forms, cut the timber and strip the hull. In comparison, the Shrike hull will come together over a weekend. If you found building a Shrike to be difficult, then don't try a Vember, which requires much patience and attention to detail. One has to enjoy the subtle creative process, and not be impatient to get the job done. That said, it is the most enjoyable and satisfying method I have used to create a hull, whether of a kayak, sailing dinghy or yacht.
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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by nickcrowhurst »

Mario, from Italy , has kindly produced an Italian language translation of the Shrike Build Manual. He hopes to start building soon. Our thanks to Mario. We have included the Italian Manual as one of the several language option in the plans download. Good work, Mario!
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Vember Tandem hull complete

Post by nickcrowhurst »

The hull of the Vember Tandem was complete with about 50 metres of strip left over, including the only seven complete lengths (4.8 metres). I'll use some of this for the sheer clamps (the timber at the junction of hull and deck.)
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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by nickcrowhurst »

A beautiful Vember built by Dave in the U.K:

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website down

Post by nickcrowhurst »

Our website, www.cnckayaks.com, has been down since yesterday evening as a consequence of the Server company we use making a "major upgrade", which two words strike fear into the heart of any experienced computer user. I'll post here when we are back online.
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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by nickcrowhurst »

Our website is back up.
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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by nickcrowhurst »

Peter M built one of the first Shrikes, so his will soon be ten years old, and she's looking as excellent as ever. This photo is from his paddling trip to Fowey, Cornwall last Friday:
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Vember Tandem complete, 38 pounds (17 kg)

Post by nickcrowhurst »

Our Vember Tandem for day paddles (no central camping equipment compartment for this version of the Tandem) is complete at 38 pounds (17 kg) with an extra kg if a rudder system is added. For comparison, our roto-moulded plastic tandem is listed as weighing 96 pounds. The UK cedar is superb, ultra-light, and very low cost. We would never destroy the handling of a Shrike or Vember by fitting a rudder, but, in a Tandem, communication between paddlers is impossible when wind and waves are at all violent, and steering is best controlled by the aft paddler, with the front paddler setting the paddling cadence. It works for us, and the rudder can be adjusted and used as a skeg, if desired.

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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by PlymouthDamo »

Looking at the finished boat, I'm even more convinced that painting it black would have been an egregious act of marine vandalism - all the various prototyping imperfections in the strips become features once they're under a shiny layer of varnish. She's definitely going to turn heads, especially when being easily lifted single-handed onto a roof rack. (The weight is about the same as my single-seat Vember now that I've retrofitted that large oval hatch to it, and I was being gawped at by a group of appreciative anglers on the slipway when I easily man-handled it off the car yesterday evening.)

For the past few days I've been hobbling round the house with my feet tightly bound, Imperial Chinese style, in the hope I can crush my size 12s down to a size 5 and squeeze into it for a test paddle.
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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by ChrisJK »

Back on page 49 I posted some photos of epoxy breakdown on my Shrike, It's been in my garage since then.The weather is warming up and I will set about sanding it to prep for a couple of coats of epoxy. Firstly I will wash it down with sugar soap. Is it best to dry or wet sand it?
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Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by nickcrowhurst »

Wet sanding with a dab of washing-up liquid in a bucket of warm water keeps down the nasty allergenic dust. Final rinse with plain water.
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