Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Places, technique, kayaks, safety, the sea...
User avatar
nickcrowhurst
Posts: 1469
Joined: Sun Aug 06, 2006 11:07 pm
Location: Cornwall, between swims.
Has thanked: 153 times
Been thanked: 266 times
Contact:

Paint is good

Post by nickcrowhurst »

Chris, the shape looks good, which is the main thing. Any cosmetic imperfections can be sorted with filler. I like one-part painted finishes. They are economical and easy to apply once the plywood is sealed with epoxy. It's easy to spot scrapes on the hull, and these can touched in with a small brush. The varnished finish looks attractive, and when it gats a bit tatty one can convert to a painted finish. This is very similar to the paint I used on the prototype. :
https://www.diy.com/departments/leyland ... 459_BQ.prd
Here's a story of two brave Dutchmen paddling across the North Sea to escape the Germans in 1941:
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-suffolk-57205877

ChrisJK
Posts: 363
Joined: Fri Jul 31, 2020 7:18 pm
Has thanked: 145 times
Been thanked: 52 times

Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by ChrisJK »

Thanks Nick
I'm slightly puzzled as that brought up Leyland trade gloss or is that what you used rather than epoxy paint.
Do I understand you mean principally painting the hull as a help to spot scrapes?
At present despite the imperfections id prefer to show wood. It will be stored indoors so is it still best to varnish?

User avatar
nickcrowhurst
Posts: 1469
Joined: Sun Aug 06, 2006 11:07 pm
Location: Cornwall, between swims.
Has thanked: 153 times
Been thanked: 266 times
Contact:

Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by nickcrowhurst »

Chris, page 32 of the Build Manual:
We used black gloss oil paint, on the basis that it was one tenth of the price of marine gloss. We applied two coats with a West foam roller, tipping off immediately with a wide soft good quality paint brush.
We painted the cockpit floor with the dregs of a can of grey International Interdeck non-slip deck paint.

Epoxy paint is eye-wateringly expensive, as well as being difficult to apply.

Page 31details the preparation and epoxy resin preparation for the paint.
Image
Image

Beryl
Posts: 273
Joined: Fri Jan 11, 2019 9:51 pm
Has thanked: 82 times
Been thanked: 46 times

Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by Beryl »

Still subject to time but I coated my hull and cockpit rim in black-tinted epoxy with no protection from the elements as it is either in my backyard, hull up, or on the roof of the car. So coastal exposure for 18 months now and still no signs of UV damage. My hope was that using the maximum recommended tinting would protect the epoxy. So far so good.

I’ve used varnish on my original wooden kayak and it is always in need of attention every year in my experience. I didn’t do it and have suffered black spotting of the panels so have had to stain it dark to disguise. If you like servicing stuff it’s fine:)
Last edited by Beryl on Thu Sep 23, 2021 10:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Growing old disgracefully

Beryl
Posts: 273
Joined: Fri Jan 11, 2019 9:51 pm
Has thanked: 82 times
Been thanked: 46 times

Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by Beryl »

I was pleased to get my first build shrike at just on 13kgs. Given a choice as this is used at sea: ‘discretion is the better part of valour’. With all this talk of building ‘one last boat’ from Demo : if I did another it would still have an ocean cockpit. It would be nearer the R than I was prepared to go last time ( took a timid 10mm off stock) and lastly the fillets would still be there but would be tiny things- the hull ones no more than a smear with a lollipop stick and none on the bulkheads.
I generously filled both ends with leftovers because I wanted the aesthetics of nice pointy ends but the point has been made this is not needed because it is structurally strong as is. Hope these findings along with others find their way into the revised manual Nick and son are considering.

Ps: I could hardly make progress the other day in Penzance when I had serial admirers stopping me getting in the car without a full explanation of such a cute and beautiful boat. Peeps just love the Shrike. They love self-build; things made of wood(even if it’s ply) and it’s elegance ( it’s sort of looks just right: not too much of this or that)
Growing old disgracefully

ChrisJK
Posts: 363
Joined: Fri Jul 31, 2020 7:18 pm
Has thanked: 145 times
Been thanked: 52 times

Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by ChrisJK »

Thanks All and thanks Nick obviously I should read the ... manual ....again.
So there are quite a few Shrikes out there in plain wood either in straight epoxy or varnished. What about Aerospace 303 protectant? I use car wax on my Greenland paddles.

User avatar
nickcrowhurst
Posts: 1469
Joined: Sun Aug 06, 2006 11:07 pm
Location: Cornwall, between swims.
Has thanked: 153 times
Been thanked: 266 times
Contact:

Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by nickcrowhurst »

Beryl wrote:
Thu Sep 23, 2021 9:49 pm
’ if I did another ......... the fillets would still be there but would be tiny things- the hull ones no more than a smear with a lollipop stick and none on the bulkheads.
New builders might bear in mind that fillets on the concave side of panel junctions, such as the interior of chines, function not only as adhesive, but also as a smooth transition between the panels. Glass fibre tape or fabric will not sit comfortably in a sharp angle. Tongue depressors are cheap and cheerful and very effective. From page 11 of the Build Manual:
"Tongue depressors produce good fillets. Hold vertical for the smallest fillet, flatter for the largest."

I use this brand:
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/392317056297 ... SwoYJelvbv

Chris Bolton
Posts: 3830
Joined: Sun Aug 22, 2004 11:33 pm
Location: NW England
Has thanked: 81 times
Been thanked: 239 times

Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by Chris Bolton »

Glass fibre tape or fabric will not sit comfortably in a sharp angle.
Well, the tape will sit comfortably, but it's likely to leave a void behind in the apex, which means a seriously weak joint, among other problems - and while you could push resin into the void, it would be heavier than the fillet.

simonballantine
Posts: 10
Joined: Wed Sep 01, 2021 8:48 pm
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 10 times

Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by simonballantine »

Thats a good point Nick, as the angles get steeper towards the ends of the boat then the fillets need to get larger so as to keep a fair curve to recieve the glass tape..

As for painting the boat, I used a blue pigment in the sheathing epoxy mix, which is almost the same shade as the finish coat of International Toplac. This is already working well at disguising the inevitable scratches. I initially tried to get a 'finish' with the pigmented epoxy, but it was disapointing. Two very thin layers of paint did the trick much more easily...

ChrisJK
Posts: 363
Joined: Fri Jul 31, 2020 7:18 pm
Has thanked: 145 times
Been thanked: 52 times

Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by ChrisJK »

Building a Shrike introduces one to a whole new world and a new skill set along with an expansion of vocabulary plus a glimpse into science and modern materials.
I realise that UV has pro's and con's on plastics in general but not in regard to epoxy. I attach this link to a test by Ocean Kayaks on a panel of various brands over a year. I suspect my boat won't get quite so harshly treated.
http://www.oneoceankayaks.com/Epoxyhtm/epox12m.htm

Beryl
Posts: 273
Joined: Fri Jan 11, 2019 9:51 pm
Has thanked: 82 times
Been thanked: 46 times

Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by Beryl »

simonballantine wrote:
Fri Sep 24, 2021 6:48 pm
Thats a good point Nick, as the angles get steeper towards the ends of the boat then the fillets need to get larger so as to keep a fair curve to recieve the glass tape..

As for painting the boat, I used a blue pigment in the sheathing epoxy mix, which is almost the same shade as the finish coat of International Toplac. This is already working well at disguising the inevitable scratches. I initially tried to get a 'finish' with the pigmented epoxy, but it was disapointing. Two very thin layers of paint did the trick much more easily...
Yes, I would agree that you can’t get a fine finish with tinted epoxy but it’s good enough for the bit underwater. I did my deck in Teak oil and now Danish oil. It really makes the best of the grain of the wood and doesn’t have the flattening effect of epoxy or varnish aesthetically.. But, like my epoxy finished hull; it’s a bit experimental. I’m hoping It proves a resilient finish. My reasoning being if it works for Greenland paddles that spent more time in the water then why not the deck?
Last edited by Beryl on Sat Sep 25, 2021 10:49 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Growing old disgracefully

Beryl
Posts: 273
Joined: Fri Jan 11, 2019 9:51 pm
Has thanked: 82 times
Been thanked: 46 times

Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by Beryl »

ChrisJK wrote:
Fri Sep 24, 2021 11:26 pm
Building a Shrike introduces one to a whole new world and a new skill set along with an expansion of vocabulary plus a glimpse into science and modern materials.
I realise that UV has pro's and con's on plastics in general but not in regard to epoxy. I attach this link to a test by Ocean Kayaks on a panel of various brands over a year. I suspect my boat won't get quite so harshly treated.
http://www.oneoceankayaks.com/Epoxyhtm/epox12m.htm
Interesting read. Add more epoxy is fine but I do think the whole rationale for wood kayaks in this plastic age is their light build and consequent responsiveness. I hope using tinting agents can get around this but I’m only 18 months into this in my own boat and apparently it starts having an effect at three years as far as I can gather.
Growing old disgracefully

Beryl
Posts: 273
Joined: Fri Jan 11, 2019 9:51 pm
Has thanked: 82 times
Been thanked: 46 times

Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home constructio

Post by Beryl »

Just another thought. I built my Shrike as per manual but I can’t get on with the recommended seating position. It just doesn’t work for me. I’ve tried it time and again but its just more unstable. I’m happy three inches further back. I’ve created a backrest that puts me an inch further forward recently but it just makes the boat more sensitive. I wonder if our body shape makes a difference? I’m long in the body but short in the leg.
Growing old disgracefully

User avatar
nickcrowhurst
Posts: 1469
Joined: Sun Aug 06, 2006 11:07 pm
Location: Cornwall, between swims.
Has thanked: 153 times
Been thanked: 266 times
Contact:

Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by nickcrowhurst »

Paul, the risk in moving back the seat is that it might negate the slight weather helm I built in to the design. Weather helm is safe, but this is particularly important in very high winds. One day, about ten years ago I was out with a pal. He was paddling his NDK Explorer, and I was in my Romany. It was blowing offshore about Force 5 to 6, and we needed to go from our sheltered position under some high ground, about half a mile across a valley, to gain shelter from high ground on the far side of the valley. The sea in the was turbulent, and the wind was much stronger. I knew we had to "ferry glide" across the wind in the valley with our bows pointe almost directly into such a strong wind. I emerged first out of the shelter and found that in the strongest gusts I had to point straight into the wind, and in between I was only about 5 degrees off the wind, but making slow progress across the valley. I risked a quick glance over my shoulder to check on my buddy, a stronger paddler than me. He had disappeared down-wind. As soon as his bow emerged into the wind it was forced downwind, and there was no way he could get back upwind. (His Explorer was unloaded , which didn't help.) This is how the poor lady died off Anglesey a few years ago in a strong offshore wind when her skeg stuck down. She disappeared over the horizon, and her body was found a few days later. I am haunted by that awful incident. A similar incident is described in "Sea Kayaker Deep Trouble" where two guys in Nordkapps (HMs IIRC) couldn't turn round I spun off downwind and towed my buddy back to the shelter.
Alternatively, one can adapt the Shrike to have no freeboard and knee bumps like Damian's submarine, and the wind will have very little effect
Overriding all the above:

Chris Bolton
Posts: 3830
Joined: Sun Aug 22, 2004 11:33 pm
Location: NW England
Has thanked: 81 times
Been thanked: 239 times

Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by Chris Bolton »

Weather helm is safe, but this is particularly important in very high winds.
I've seen this too, also in a Norkapp. This was in 1989, before adjustable skegs were common. We were on a 12 day camping trip, and the paddler tied a rolled up karrimat onto his back deck, and as a result was struggling to cope with the weather helm. So he moved the karrimat to his front deck - and was quite happy in F3-4. When the F5-6 gusts arrived, he went straight downwind and despite being a big strong lad, there was nothing he could do. The trip leader caught up with him and took charge of the karrimat. The important lesson is that lee helm can get unexpectedly worse with stronger winds, just when it really matters.

eskapist
Posts: 17
Joined: Sun Aug 04, 2019 9:50 pm
Been thanked: 8 times

Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by eskapist »

Nick, while this thread is focused on the interaction between wind and skeg, I recall that in an earlier post you mentioned that you fitted a bow skeg and so wonder if you can comment on it's effectiveness and location. Looking at the picture it might be about 1.5 MTRS from the bow?
Trevor

ChrisJK
Posts: 363
Joined: Fri Jul 31, 2020 7:18 pm
Has thanked: 145 times
Been thanked: 52 times

Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by ChrisJK »

Wow, as a fair weather paddler this has got very serious but that is the nature of paddling and an indication of how the weather conditions can rapidly change.
At present my centre of gravity is where I think it should be and I will install a thin layer of floor insulation for a seat with some minicell foam as a backrest.
Before a proper trip probably in shallow water I will submit my Shrike to a pool test (I presume that once cured Epoxy is resistant to Chlorine) which will also allow me to try a wet exit / possible roll with folks to help if necessary.
I get the impression that the Inuit might not have had mini-cell foam and fixed seats so perhaps could alter their CoG depending on the conditions. Those Inuit possibly 'lost at sea' may not have been recorded but they will have been grieved.

User avatar
nickcrowhurst
Posts: 1469
Joined: Sun Aug 06, 2006 11:07 pm
Location: Cornwall, between swims.
Has thanked: 153 times
Been thanked: 266 times
Contact:

Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by nickcrowhurst »

One more anecdote about the problem of lee helm:
An American couple who are our good friends decided to take part in the Everglades Challenge, a 300 mile multi-day paddle down the Gulf Of Mexico coast. They decided to use their tandem kayak, which was fitted with a rudder. They had been paddling together for decades, and had trained for months for the Challenge. The start was to cross Tampa Bay into the teeth of a Force 6 onshore wind.
They lasted about 30 minutes, and retired from the race, sorely disappointed. I spoke to the man: let's call him Chuck.
Me: "what was the problem?"
Chuck: "It was impossible to turn the bow into the wind. We needed a much bigger rudder."
Me: "That would make the problem even worse. You needed to lift the rudder completely out of the water."
I explained about lee helm, and how to deal with it. He refused to believe what I told him, and insisted that he needed a bigger rudder. They sold the tandem.
We are still good friends.

User avatar
nickcrowhurst
Posts: 1469
Joined: Sun Aug 06, 2006 11:07 pm
Location: Cornwall, between swims.
Has thanked: 153 times
Been thanked: 266 times
Contact:

Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by nickcrowhurst »

eskapist wrote:
Sun Sep 26, 2021 9:07 pm
I recall that in an earlier post you mentioned that you fitted a bow skeg and so wonder if you can comment on it's effectiveness and location. Looking at the picture it might be about 1.5 MTRS from the bow
[/quote
Trevor, the position of the front of the slot in the hull is 86 cm from the tip of the bow.
Image

Regarding performance under sail, I earlier wrote:

Today there was a brief lull in the seemingly endless procession of gales, and I was able to try the sailing rig with a decent 10 to 15 mph breeze. While trying to make allowances for the natural bias of the father, I can say that I'm pleased with the performance with the forward skeg. The Shrike is very light and easily manoeuvred, and the forefoot is cut away, unlike many modern designs, so with the sail so far forward, instant lee helm is liable to be the response to a gust from the for'ard quarter. It was, but deployment of the forward skeg totally prevented this, as I had hoped. I was surprised how predictable was the lateral stability when responding to gusts. Steadying sails have been used by power-driven vessels for many years, so I should not have been surprised. With both skegs fully deployed, and the wind on the beam, the kayak tracked as if on rails, and we headed steadily for a point a mile away. Going to windward I used the forward skeg only, fully deployed. If I needed to bear away on a heading wind shift I added a little stern skeg to the mix. To bear away onto a reach I raised the forward skeg until the desired course was attained. I was steering without using the paddle, but there were only small wavelets.
I've only scratched the surface of learning to use the twin skeg rig. I've much to learn, and that's good.
I was in company with a pal in a modern sea kayak with a similar sailing rig, but with only a traditional stern skeg. The Shrike pointed considerably higher when going to windward, as one would expect."

and also:
"the only part of the sailing rig that cannot easily be fitted after the hull and deck are completed is a strut down from the mast step to the keel. In my case, I fitted a second skeg in the bow to improve windward performance, and the mast step is supported by the skeg box. To retro-fit the forward skeg box I installed a forward hatch just large enough to insert the skeg box. You could fit a forward hatch to enable a strut to be fitted. A reinforcing pad of plywood could also be fitted under the deck after dry-fitting the foredeck, but before gluing it in place."

Image

eskapist
Posts: 17
Joined: Sun Aug 04, 2019 9:50 pm
Been thanked: 8 times

Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by eskapist »

Thanks for that Nick, I don't know why I missed the full post---- must slow down 🙃
Because I'm light and not in the first flush of youthful fitness any more and want to try out a sail, I'm going to build in dual skegs on my Shrike LV build which will start next month.
Vember is nearing completion!

User avatar
nickcrowhurst
Posts: 1469
Joined: Sun Aug 06, 2006 11:07 pm
Location: Cornwall, between swims.
Has thanked: 153 times
Been thanked: 266 times
Contact:

Completed Shrike for £800

Post by nickcrowhurst »

This Shrike has been completed from a Selkie kit, and is for sale for £800 in East Sussex:
https://www.preloved.co.uk/adverts/show ... ast-sussex
Image

User avatar
nickcrowhurst
Posts: 1469
Joined: Sun Aug 06, 2006 11:07 pm
Location: Cornwall, between swims.
Has thanked: 153 times
Been thanked: 266 times
Contact:

A rolling Shrike kit from Chesapeake Light Craft

Post by nickcrowhurst »

Image

In the past I've heard the comment "Anyone can roll one of those rolling kayaks. It's quite different trying to roll the usual type of sea kayak." This misses a vital point. A benefit that surprised me when I experienced it:- It's difficult to learn to roll in a kayak that is reluctant to roll. If you learn the complex and coordinated physical movements in a kayak that is easy to roll, and do this sufficiently often to burn those movements into muscle memory, rolling a reluctant rolling kayak will be far, far easier. Damian has made the similar point in a current thread from Pedro 75. You wouldn't try to teach a kid to ride a bike by pointing them up a steep hill.
Our Shrike-R is just the standard Shrike with the topside panels cut along the line 60 mm lower than standard. The cutting lines at various heights are shown in the plans.
Chesapeake Light Craft (clcboats.com) has added the Shrike-R to the kits it sells:
Image

John Harris is the owner of CLC Boats, and Nick Schade designs many of their excellent kayaks. CLC is the world's leading designer and supplier of S & G kits which range from sailing yachts through small caravans to kayaks. I met those two gentlemen a few years ago in Wisconsin, at Canoecopia, the world's largest annual Show for canoes and kayaks. I have also had several conversations with John Harris by telephone. I mention this because without the work of these two gentlemen, the Shrike project would not exist. Their books and videos were the inspiration. On a side issue, John Harris was instrumental in leaning on a foreign company that had used our Shrike design and claimed it was theirs. He put them straight.
In addition to all that, they are just excellent men. They are both highly intelligent, talented, and they have been extremely helpful and inspiring to this retired old guy in a shed in Cornwall, just supplying free printable plans to the world.
I thought it was time to say a big thank-you to the guys who inspired the Shrike Project. Thank you John and Nick.
Nick.

DavidDeWitt
Posts: 29
Joined: Sun Oct 18, 2020 4:48 pm
Location: Boston
Been thanked: 14 times

Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by DavidDeWitt »

Congratulations on CLC picking up the Shrike-R! Will a Shrike kit come next?

fergus_finn
Posts: 14
Joined: Mon Jun 08, 2020 8:44 am
Been thanked: 7 times

Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by fergus_finn »

Perhaps you are aware of this already David but Selkie kayaks do have a full size shrike kit.
https://selkiekayaks.co.uk/boatkit

User avatar
nickcrowhurst
Posts: 1469
Joined: Sun Aug 06, 2006 11:07 pm
Location: Cornwall, between swims.
Has thanked: 153 times
Been thanked: 266 times
Contact:

Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by nickcrowhurst »

...and Clearstream Custom Watercraft in New Hampshire, USA from CLC kits, Bergerboots in Germany, and JR craftyard in Estonia are ones that come to mind.
Yesterday we had news of our first builder in Croatia. Domagoj is making a 3-piece Shrike. That makes 357 builders from 53 countries who have sent in details and/or photos.
We're preparing a list of updates and changes to the Shrike Build manual. If anyone has suggestions please post here. Anything extensive will probably have to go in the appendices as when I started writing it in 2013 I was clueless about the complexities of embedding photos into a Word text document. I've now learnt how to tame the photos, but crazy stuff happens when I try to change the main 2013 Manual. Make the pics behave happily by:
right click on the photo> select "wrap text". You are now in a world of potential pain, but from the extensive sub-list select "in line with text" and you can move the photo and text without banging your head against the wall.

ChrisJK
Posts: 363
Joined: Fri Jul 31, 2020 7:18 pm
Has thanked: 145 times
Been thanked: 52 times

Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by ChrisJK »

Thanks Nick
I am trying an alternative method for constructing the cockpit. Here it is an ocean cockpit and might be a bit more challenging for a keyhole. I have used two lengths of ply and got round the bends with the help of a heat gun and screws.
Image

Image

Image

I left time between work to allow shapes to mould so the fitting is sitting for a day or two before i take it out and work on the rim.
at present it slotted in snugly

User avatar
nickcrowhurst
Posts: 1469
Joined: Sun Aug 06, 2006 11:07 pm
Location: Cornwall, between swims.
Has thanked: 153 times
Been thanked: 266 times
Contact:

Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by nickcrowhurst »

Chris, that's an excellent addition to the Builders' Tips Appendix, so thanks for that.

simonballantine
Posts: 10
Joined: Wed Sep 01, 2021 8:48 pm
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 10 times

Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by simonballantine »

Nick, I have started building a second Shrike. This will be a similar 3-piece but this time built for maximum strength within a target 15kg boat weight. I would be happy to write an appendix about my 3-piece construction method and another on how to most efficiently maximise strength for the minimum weight. Give me a few weeks whilst I build the boat and take photos as I go....
The Shrike seems to be pretty robust, but it would be very interested to hear if anyone has ever broken or holed one...

User avatar
nickcrowhurst
Posts: 1469
Joined: Sun Aug 06, 2006 11:07 pm
Location: Cornwall, between swims.
Has thanked: 153 times
Been thanked: 266 times
Contact:

Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by nickcrowhurst »

Simon, they would be grand additions to the Build Manual. Many thanks.
The only damage I've heard about was during a practice recovery of a capsized Shrike and paddler at Saltash about six years ago. The patient managed to slam his elbow into the foredeck. I was about 50 yards away, but Damian was there, and he'll know details of the damage.

ChrisJK
Posts: 363
Joined: Fri Jul 31, 2020 7:18 pm
Has thanked: 145 times
Been thanked: 52 times

Re: Shrike, a lightweight sea kayak for home construction.^

Post by ChrisJK »

Hi Nick
Looking over my last post I can see the use of screws for fixing sheer clamps and where epoxy joins have come adrift or need pin point holding followed by the insertion of sections of cocktail sticks to fill the holes. There's also some gaps to fill along the join between the hull and the decks. As you mention thickened epoxy can cure quite a few ills. I had bought colloidal silica and a wood dust/silica mix which mixed together helped at times to get a nearer colour match.

Post Reply

Return to “Sea Kayaking”