Repair/Emergency kit

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Rgrc29
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Repair/Emergency kit

Post by Rgrc29 »

Following on from the discussion about what safety kit to carry I thought I’d ask what people carry as a repair kit, or other emergency articles they might keep handy?
I recently attended a course and it blew my mind a little, I naively hadn’t imagined a hatch cover could be lost and might need replacing. What do you take out in your boat?

pathbrae
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Re: Repair/Emergency kit

Post by pathbrae »

There's a mindset which fixates on disaster planning and on "preapring for the unexpected" which, If you took it all to it's natural conclusion, the answer would probably be "another boat" They also seem to be itching to get to use all their kit!
I always think the best thing to have with you is a bit of ingenuity - most things can be patched enough to get you out of trouble if you use a bit of lateral thinking and very minimum kit.
Leave the space for beer and biscuits
So much sea - so little time to see it.

seawolf856
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Re: Repair/Emergency kit

Post by seawolf856 »

Pathbrae is right, you will never carry enough repair or emergency kit to cover all disasters but a bin bag and a roll of duct tape can sort out a lost hatch cover, a broken seat, skeg issues, loose foot pegs or even a cracked boat. Assuming you already carry a spare paddle and don’t paddle alone, the beer and biscuits should take care of everything else 😁

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Re: Repair/Emergency kit

Post by mcgruff »

In my experience, bottle of whisky, a revolver, and a bag of Krugerrands can get you out of most scrapes.

Maybe not White & Mackay though, unless your hull needs a good scrub.

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Rgrc29
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Re: Repair/Emergency kit

Post by Rgrc29 »

Beer, whiskey and biscuits, i'm almost surprised there's no mention of irn bru in the complete Scottish survival kit.
My boat is plastic, is there any quick fix plastic repair product for squeezing into holes and scratches i might make in it, not encountered anything myself?
Likewise, my friend has a carbon boat, in the unlikely event we damaged that (we've already tried quite hard), is there any quick fix solution for getting those home?

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Re: Repair/Emergency kit

Post by Owen »

Not sure why you'd need the gun, putting the paddler out of his/her misery maybe.

For a quick fix on plastic or carbon boats, sex wax will fill small holes and (hopefully) get you home. An old style ww bouyancy bag to stuff into the holes compartment is also useful.

pathbrae
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Re: Repair/Emergency kit

Post by pathbrae »

https://www.karitek.co.uk/shop/kayak-ge ... y=15487417
For a quick, teporary fix seal-easy do a patch kit which will stick to wet hulls, whatever they are made of.
(and they don't eat into the beer and biscuits space too much)
So much sea - so little time to see it.

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Jim
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Re: Repair/Emergency kit

Post by Jim »

The carbon boat is easy, you need some sandpaper, epoxy resin, some pieces of carbon cloth (you could use fibreglass for cheaper in the field repairs), something to mix the resin in and something to spread the resin onto the hull and through the cloth. Also disposable gloves. If you want to be able to do more than one repair you either need to carry solvent or mixing pots, gloves and brushes or spreaders. You also need time, it will need to cure overnight, so can only really be done when you stop to make camp.

For temporary get you to the campsite repairs gaffer tape has been the standard for years for all boat types.

For more permanent repairs on PE boats you can use something like a gas soldering iron to weld splits if you have some PE strips (some people trim then from the folded over part of the cockpit coaming), but you really need to practice on something similar first.

Epoxy putty can sometimes be useful, you knead the 2 parts together and it will stick to stuff even if wet, although it is easily disturbed until it cures. It will stick to PE but is likely to pop off if the panel flexes in a subsequent bump, it will be more permanent on composite boats, in fact it can be a bit of a nightmare to chisel off when you come to do a permanent repair later.

I normally just carry gaffer tape.

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MikeB
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Re: Repair/Emergency kit

Post by MikeB »

It is well worth having a days worth of "emergency food". It is also well worth having the appropriate allen keys for your particular boat's skeg set-up. And whatever tools it takes to strip your cooking stove of choice to get the jet out - and clean it!

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Re: Repair/Emergency kit

Post by robhorton »

What you need in the way of repair kit rather depends on where you are doing and what you are doing. Someone leading a remote expedition would need something more comprehensive than some doing a day trip with friends where landing is fairly easy. I'm assuming that since you are asking you are more in the latter category so I would focus on fixing the "simple but annoying" problems rather than major boat repairs. Howard Jeffs sells some vacuum packed bits (https://www.howardjeffs.com/expedition-essentials/) - there are also some videos on there to give you some ideas. I wouldn't take stuff for a composite repair unless it was a multi-week trip.

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Discovery Kayaker
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Re: Repair/Emergency kit

Post by Discovery Kayaker »

Keep focused on what type of paddling you are undertaking, day trips hand railing the coast, single day open crossings, or multi day expeditions. For each of these your need for a repair kit will increase and vary considerably.

In short carry what you need to get you out of any foreseeable problems the longer the trip the more is required, off shore paddling then the need to stay afloat increases etc.

For me on a day trip the key piece of kit I carry is a couple of large rolled up air bags, some duct tape, a set of small tools and a reed hatch cover for my kayak. That way everything is covered. After that the trip dictates what you will need. Good luck and enjoy your paddling.

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John K
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Re: Repair/Emergency kit

Post by John K »

MikeB wrote:It is well worth having a days worth of "emergency food". It is also well worth having the appropriate allen keys for your particular boat's skeg set-up. And whatever tools it takes to strip your cooking stove of choice to get the jet out - and clean it!
That sounds like hard earned advice :D

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Re: Repair/Emergency kit

Post by Mac50L »

MikeB wrote:
Mon Jul 27, 2020 12:46 pm
It is well worth having a days worth of "emergency food". It is also well worth having the appropriate allen keys for your particular boat's skeg set-up. And whatever tools it takes to strip your cooking stove of choice to get the jet out - and clean it!
Emergency food OK, not a bad idea but Allen keys? Never. OK I never use a skeg either and my rudders (seven kayaks) have never broken in 4 decades. Stove stripping? The Primus had a pricker, the gas one (screw on burner) never clogs. I might have carried epoxy on a long trip but never used it.

After a compass, the most important item is Duct Tape. It can hold the world together.

Rgrc29
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Re: Repair/Emergency kit

Post by Rgrc29 »

Thanks for the range of advice, I plan to make up a couple of repair packs for myself and a friend. I truly hope they’ll spend the rest of their days buried in a hatch along with the first aid kits he’s making up for us.

I plan on some putty, gaffer/duct tape, patch of some sort. Plastic bags and either cable ties or bungee cord to secure a hatch with or create an air bag to prevent a compartment flooding. I also don’t tend to leave home without a multitool somewhere, just need to find one that’s very corrosion resistant. Going to stuff it all into a wide mouth bottle or clip lock container, should be a bit safer from the effects of Murphy law.

pathbrae
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Re: Repair/Emergency kit

Post by pathbrae »

Mac50L wrote:
Thu Jul 30, 2020 11:42 pm

... but Allen keys? Never. OK I never use a skeg either and my rudders (seven kayaks) have never broken in 4 decades. Stove stripping? The Primus had a pricker, the gas one (screw on burner) never clogs.
After a compass, the most important item is Duct Tape. It can hold the world together.

"and my rudders (seven kayaks) have never broken in 4 decades" "the gas one (screw on burner) never clogs. " By the law of averages you must be getting fairly close to failure. Or maybe you just like to tempt fate?
And, if the OP potentially needs Alan Keys or a particular size of spanner for running repairs on a longer trip then the fact you've not broken a rudder in 40 years is totally irrelevant.
Personally, I've never had a lot of success getting duct tape to stick to a cold, wet, salty kayak hull - but it can be useful for other things so it still gets added to the away kit.
So much sea - so little time to see it.

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Jim
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Re: Repair/Emergency kit

Post by Jim »

pathbrae wrote:
Fri Jul 31, 2020 5:56 pm

Personally, I've never had a lot of success getting duct tape to stick to a cold, wet, salty kayak hull - but it can be useful for other things so it still gets added to the away kit.
On camping trips I usually have a towel and stove available to mitigate those circumstances...

pathbrae
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Re: Repair/Emergency kit

Post by pathbrae »

Jim wrote:
Fri Jul 31, 2020 7:21 pm
pathbrae wrote:
Fri Jul 31, 2020 5:56 pm

Personally, I've never had a lot of success getting duct tape to stick to a cold, wet, salty kayak hull - but it can be useful for other things so it still gets added to the away kit.
On camping trips I usually have a towel and stove available to mitigate those circumstances...
Or even some meths or (dare I say it?) whisky to clean and dry the hull - but that relies on you being able to get to shore...... ;-)
So much sea - so little time to see it.

Mac50L
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Re: Repair/Emergency kit

Post by Mac50L »

pathbrae wrote:
Fri Jul 31, 2020 5:56 pm
Or maybe you just like to tempt fate?
Or have reliable equipment.
And, if the OP potentially needs Alan (Allen) Keys or a particular size of spanner for running repairs on a longer trip then the fact you've not broken a rudder in 40 years is totally irrelevant.
The original question was "What do you carry?" Hence the reply aimed at what and why in my case. Also having well designed equipment to start with.
Personally, I've never had a lot of success getting duct tape to stick to a cold, wet, salty kayak hull - but it can be useful for other things so it still gets added to the away kit.
Wipe and dry the hull while having a cup of coffee using the stove that works.

Talking of stoves it was my game to try and have water boiling before the rest of a group had got the tops of their Thermoses unscrewed. This included the assembling and preheating needed with a kerosene stove.

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Re: Repair/Emergency kit

Post by mcgruff »

I haven't used it before but this T-rex tape claims to stick to wet surfaces.

T-rex tape
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seawolf856
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Re: Repair/Emergency kit

Post by seawolf856 »

mcgruff wrote:
Sun Aug 02, 2020 12:56 am
I haven't used it before but this T-rex tape claims to stick to wet surfaces.

T-rex tape
WOW, if this stuff is half as good as its advert says, it could be a game changer for emergency repairs.

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Re: Repair/Emergency kit

Post by mcgruff »

This was impressive - although of course it's an advertising video.



If it lives up to the hype, might even be able to make an emergency hull repair at sea.
Have fun and don't die.

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Re: Repair/Emergency kit

Post by robhorton »

mcgruff wrote:
Tue Aug 04, 2020 5:21 pm
If it lives up to the hype, might even be able to make an emergency hull repair at sea.
It's available on Amazon (and probably other places) if anyone wants to give it a go. It seems to only go up to 48mm wide though which is a bit narrow for a hull repair.

Something like Denso Tape will work at sea (and comes in ~100mm width) but it's horrible stuff to work with.

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PeterG
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Re: Repair/Emergency kit

Post by PeterG »

As with everything, knowledge and experience is more valuable than carrying a load of kit most of which is probably past its sell by date and no longer sticky/flexible/elastic or whatever desirable qualities it had when you bought it.

Practise some repairs with whatever you have decided to carry. A month in Greenland will require SAS grade training to strip and rebuild a multifuel stove in minutes in addition to being able to deal with almost anything breaking or being lost. For a day trip some good quality tape might suffice.

Things I have actually used in real life, mostly lent to other people who were under-prepared: spare paddle, air bags (I always have them pushed down the pointy ends anyway), makeshift hatch covers, duct tape, electrical tape, epoxy putty, sugru, surf wax, spare skeg wire cut to size(and correct allen keys), eXtreme glue for split latex seals, light setting epoxy repair patch (but short shelf life, so already pretty stiff although it did the job), bits of rope for broken toggles and decklines.

and yes, I can strip my Edelrid stove and rebuild in 5 minutes, clean and with new seals.

I also forged a new connection for a rudder system from a wrought iron nail, using pliers and suitable punch/hammer rocks on the beach in Greenland. Much much more satisfying than carrying a range of shackles which is what we should have had. Hand made wrought iron nails from the wrecks of whaling ships, infinitely re-usable and not inclined to rust are such a resource. The invention of the cheap and disposable machine made steel nail was one of the early mis-steps towards our throwaway society.

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