Flare or Flair

Inland paddling
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Chris_Eastabrook
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Flare or Flair

Post by Chris_Eastabrook »

There was much debate on the ferry while editing the Shiva Promo video as to the spelling of flair / flare within a kayaking context.

True concepts are always going to be hard to label. By giving something a label it must have a definition and could easily become a procedure. Procedural understanding often useful at the beginning but often a barrier to developing into a skilful paddler. I reckon that the concept of flairing /flaring is a combination of both of the following reasons for each spelling but maybe one spelling/reason will mean more to you than the other.

Flair because you can paddle with flair or style. To have flair in a specific environment.

Flare that roughly resembles the shape, as in with a trumpet. You perform a move that has a flaring shape.

What do you reckon?

Warning. This is actually ridiculous 'new skool' (?) chatter but maybe an interesting debate.

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Poke
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Re: Flare or Flair

Post by Poke »

Come back down to earth Chris... it’s called a boof... ;-)
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Poke
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Re: Flare or Flair

Post by Poke »

Or a more helpful answer:
http://www.ukriversguidebook.co.uk/foru ... 72#p223772
Note it is flare and not flair by now popular communica, and an original spelling mistake by myself when first naming the concept for coaching terms by introducing it in the Genes DVD.
(In summary, it's a made up word, that was spelt wrongly in the first place, makes equally as much sense taking either of the original meanings of the word, so it really doesn’t matter how you spell it :-)

P.s. Jealous.
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Pete C.
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Re: Flare or Flair

Post by Pete C. »

Style guide Pete says 'flare'.

Flair is a transitive verb meaning 'sniff out', but 'flare' can be used both transitively ('I flared the bottom drop on the Laboreiro, despite there barely being enough water') and intransitively ('I flared right over the granite slab').

I think the closest historical meaning that takes both forms is 'Spread out or display (oneself) conspicuously. Now rare. E17.' - it makes the clear link to shameless showboating. A more modest boater would have stayed with the 'boof' or the 'pancake' instead.

And Poke - hate to break it to you but all words are made up, and most of them by Shakespeare...

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Re: Flare or Flair

Post by DaveWortley »

Flair, because it's got air in it!

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Re: Flare or Flair

Post by Adrian Cooper »

Pete C. wrote:Flair is a transitive verb meaning 'sniff out', but 'flare' can be used both transitively ('I flared the bottom drop on the Laboreiro, despite there barely being enough water') and intransitively ('I flared right over the granite slab').

.......... hate to break it to you but all words are made up
And why not follow suit Pete?

Flair is of course a noun with a number of meanings, one of which relates to smell. The noun may have been derived from an old French verb and thence from latin.

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callum s
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Re: Flare or Flair

Post by callum s »

In Scotland we stick with Phlaire, the traditional Gaelic spelling.

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Re: Flare or Flair

Post by NPearce »

I associate Flair as a means of showing expression thought multiple badges - Would be havoc with a drytop!

Image

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Leinad
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Re: Flare or Flair

Post by Leinad »

So what do you call a flare with flair?
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Re: Flare or Flair

Post by DaveBland »

Flair sounds gayer.
I'll be doing flares.
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janet brown
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Re: Flare or Flair

Post by janet brown »

My vote is for flare!
(Just wish I could actually do one!).

Janet

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David Fairweather
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Re: Flare or Flair

Post by David Fairweather »

Did you know that the original name for Pac-Man was Puck-Man? You'd think it was because he looks like a hockey puck but it actually comes from the Japanese phrase 'Paku-Paku,' which means to flap one's mouth open and closed. They changed it because they thought Puck-Man would be too easy to vandalize, you know, like people could just scratch off the P and turn it into an F or whatever.

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Re: Flare or Flair

Post by edhunter »

David Fairweather wrote:Did you know that the original name for Pac-Man was Puck-Man? You'd think it was because he looks like a hockey puck but it actually comes from the Japanese phrase 'Paku-Paku,' which means to flap one's mouth open and closed. They changed it because they thought Puck-Man would be too easy to vandalize, you know, like people could just scratch off the P and turn it into an F or whatever.
Got to love a bit of Scott Pilgrim.

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Re: Flare or Flair

Post by Rdscott »

I wounder if there is an old school name for it.

Plus i wounder if there is any truth in callums gaelic wording. i didnt think ph together existed in gaelic. may however be wrong.

To be honest theres that many people that differ on how things shouldbe spelt doesit matter.

For exampleis carabiner speltwith a C or a K (for anyone who deosnt know it is a K relating from its european origins based from the desigen to be used with a munter hitch named after werner munter, HMS stands for Halbmastwurfsicherung) Alsomay notbe 100% true but foolow your manufactures of choice.)

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Randy Fandango
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Re: Flare or Flair

Post by Randy Fandango »

And let's not forget that other all important point: the naming of performing the act.
In action when doing a flare (or flair) is one flaring (or flairing) or flarin' (or -- of course -- flairin')?
Hmmmmm.....
Personally I've always assumed that every time Simon writes boofin' the g on his keyboard has temporarily and mysteriously been replaced with a ' :-)
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Re: Flare or Flair

Post by DaveBland »

If you are looking for old skool names for 'flares' I'd go for "bouncin off rocks".
dave

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Chrace
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Re: Flare or Flair

Post by Chrace »

Flair or flare? Take your pick, but I'd rather be doing flares. (...)

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Tom_Laws
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Re: Flare or Flair

Post by Tom_Laws »

Poke wrote:Come back down to earth Chris... it’s called a boof... ;-)

Don't you effin' start.

You can boof and not flare and flare without a boof.

Oh, and in Cymru it is Fflar with a tor bach on the a.

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Tea Boy Tom
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Re: Flare or Flair

Post by Tea Boy Tom »

In my professional opinion, whether you flare or flair is entirely down to your temporal focus...

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Tom_Laws
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Re: Flare or Flair

Post by Tom_Laws »

It's clearly all about Lateral Mobility.

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Re: Flare or Flair

Post by Nedders »

I going new school with a flur! I realise i may be on my own.
Nick Newman.

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Re: Flare or Flair

Post by Rdscott »

how about flange

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Tom_Laws
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Re: Flare or Flair

Post by Tom_Laws »

Rdscott wrote:how about flange



Old Hat.

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Re: Flare or Flair

Post by Rdscott »

Thanks forclearing that up Tom i guess a flare/flaire/fflar/phlaire is just another evolutional step

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Re: Flare or Flair

Post by Simon Westgarth »

As mentioned before, it was in the making of Genes DVD that I chose too spell it as Flare, and not flair, a mistake perhaps, but the naming was by Dave Carroll. In the years before at Gene17 we had attempted to conceptualise the dynamic movement of the boat and the paddler, through an arcing move. Now this is more about the paddler through both leaning and edging to gain purchase on their paddle blade at an important transition in the rapid, than the resulting product of a boof where it is used in most cases. The dynamic movement of flaring accesses the rivers energy, often through the shape of the feature, like riding arc of a curling wave, or breaking out by driving the boat over a boulders pressure wave into the eddy be hide, or punching a diagonal lateral on a vee hole, it's all flaring not just boofin.

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Tom_Laws
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Re: Flare or Flair

Post by Tom_Laws »

I hope Max will explain the "Ringe" soon.

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Re: Flare or Flair

Post by 66quinny66 »

Rdscott wrote:Thanks forclearing that up Tom I guess a flare/flaire/fflar/phlaire is just another evolutional step
As is "evolutional" from evolutionary? :P

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Woods
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Re: Flare or Flair

Post by Woods »

Line! (who's going to call Housey Housey?)
While we're all here, what is the correct spelling of 'phonix monkey'?

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Pete C.
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Re: Flare or Flair

Post by Pete C. »

Woods wrote:While we're all here, what is the correct spelling of 'phonix monkey'?
Woods - don't start. I'd got as far as "Monkey in a spelling bee = phonics monkey, but then I checked the source and found they were spelling it 'fonics'. Aargh!

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roo
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Re: Flare or Flair

Post by roo »

Now something in the back of my mind is telling me Mr Woods is responsible for the whole of this discussion in the first place.

Here's my 2p.....

Flare - this is a non-discussion in my opinion.

However if you are performing this move in Scotland or somebody on your trip is Scottish - or just generally swear a lot. Then you can perhaps call it a "Phlairgh".

For example:

A lyrically challenged Scot cleans a Flare on a drop, but the landing surprises them - instead of saying "oofffff" he or she might say something that sounds like "Aye, that was Huckin' hard".

You might respond, "Alright Big-Man, Nice Phlairgh."

Even better if you've got a cold.

Phonix Monkey - I'm not even sure I know how to do one - so no comment just yet...........

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