Boat Help

Inland paddling
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AKayaker
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Boat Help

Post by AKayaker »

Hi, can anyone recommend me a boat? I am about 5ft 9 and 11 stone. I paddle at I think about 2/3* (never been properly assessed, hope to do it this winter). I intend on using it on river trips like the Dart Loop and Barle in winter and mostly for messing about (not serious playboating) on my local weir in summer. If possible it needs to easy to roll as my roll is currently a bit hit and miss. I think I probably want a river runner, but recommendations for them or anything else is welcomed. Also the ability to cheaply source one would be amazing as I am currently on a limited budget. Thanks

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HAZA
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Re: Boat Help

Post by HAZA »

Wavesport D70 They've called it the 4x4 of kayaks. Runs rapids like a fast creekboat with a hull that will also spin on green waves. It is, indeed, all that and more. Peaked deck for resurfacing

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Mark Thompson
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Re: Boat Help

Post by Mark Thompson »

The best advice i can give you is to try as many boats as you can both on the bank and on the river. Often people recomend boats they have loved but they often dont always give the next person the same feel. If you are after something to be comfortable in, useful to have some speed try creek type boats, they now do flat hulls (Burns, etc...) semi displacement hulls or full displacementhulls. If you want something more fun look for a river runner, these often have less comfort and sharper edges/ rails but this bring a new element to paddling.

A good place to go is Cardiff White water course, which early morn run on low levels and the shop have various demos for you to try. In addition your local canoe shop should offer a demo service for a weekend which would allow you to try various boats out, or get to a local club and ask to get inpeople boats and try them, dependant on your club they may even have some to borrow. Rememebr that often boats come in severial sizes so if to large or two small but you like how it feels and moves on the water then it may be worth trying to get hold of a diferent size and trying again.

The shop in Exter also has a few demo boats you could try on flat water but it gives you a good feel for them. Note it is worth trying the same boat on moving water as often they react differently, and personally i dont like full displacement hull on flat water so i paddle a semi displacement.

Hope this helps
Mark Thompson
(Outdoor Performance Coaching).

clarky999
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Re: Boat Help

Post by clarky999 »

Just get an Inazone.

Better and cheaper for you atm than anything else on the market.

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RichA
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Re: Boat Help

Post by RichA »

clarky999 wrote:Just get an Inazone.
No. If the boat is uncomfortable for you then you will not enjoy it. Inazones do not suit everyone.

As Mark has said, try as many different boats out as you can. And I'd add, don't rush your choice, but equally you can always re-sell if you don't get on with it so don't stress about it too much.

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TheKrikkitWars
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Re: Boat Help

Post by TheKrikkitWars »

RichA wrote:
clarky999 wrote:Just get an Inazone.
No. If the boat is uncomfortable for you then you will not enjoy it. Inazones do not suit everyone.

As Mark has said, try as many different boats out as you can. And I'd add, don't rush your choice, but equally you can always re-sell if you don't get on with it so don't stress about it too much.
Meh, if it's uncomfortable for you; you've not added enough foam yet...

Inazone/Z.One/Axiom style boats are the way forward at this kind of level... Pushing people to try creekboats is counterproductive; How can you improve if you're in a big floaty tub that forgives your mistakes?
ONE BLADE, ONE LOVE, [TOO] MANY PIES


Joshua Kelly

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Adrian Cooper
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Re: Boat Help

Post by Adrian Cooper »

TheKrikkitWars wrote: Pushing people to try creekboats is counterproductive; How can you improve if you're in a big floaty tub that forgives your mistakes?
This is a feature of many posts on boat choice these days. Can we not understand how paddlers of yesteryear ever managed to get half decent at paddling round hulled boats?

Mike Jones et al paddled down Everest in big round bottomed boats.
Alan Fox and Loel Collins paddled the Zambezi in Overflows.
Shaun Baker seemed to do everything in a Spud.

None of these boats had sharp edges to trip them up to assist them in 'getting more skilled'.

What you need is good technique to use the boat you paddle, not a boat which will manage your technique.

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Strad
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Re: Boat Help

Post by Strad »

Adrian Cooper wrote:
TheKrikkitWars wrote: Pushing people to try creekboats is counterproductive; How can you improve if you're in a big floaty tub that forgives your mistakes?
This is a feature of many posts on boat choice these days. Can we not understand how paddlers of yesteryear ever managed to get half decent at paddling round hulled boats?

Mike Jones et al paddled down Everest in big round bottomed boats.
Alan Fox and Loel Collins paddled the Zambezi in Overflows.
Shaun Baker seemed to do everything in a Spud.

None of these boats had sharp edges to trip them up to assist them in 'getting more skilled'.

What you need is good technique to use the boat you paddle, not a boat which will manage your technique.
I don't know about Mike Jones et al, but I'm pretty sure the others would have honed their skills in slalom boats at some point, certainly that was the boat style many took on WW before all the tupperware appeared, the sharp pointy ends and tippy edges did assist in learning
Old School?? I miss my AQII..
Graham Stradling

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TheKrikkitWars
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Re: Boat Help

Post by TheKrikkitWars »

Adrian Cooper wrote:
TheKrikkitWars wrote: Pushing people to try creekboats is counterproductive; How can you improve if you're in a big floaty tub that forgives your mistakes?
This is a feature of many posts on boat choice these days. Can we not understand how paddlers of yesteryear ever managed to get half decent at paddling round hulled boats?

Mike Jones et al paddled down Everest in big round bottomed boats.
Alan Fox and Loel Collins paddled the Zambezi in Overflows.
Shaun Baker seemed to do everything in a Spud.

None of these boats had sharp edges to trip them up to assist them in 'getting more skilled'.

What you need is good technique to use the boat you paddle, not a boat which will manage your technique.
Indeed, Incidentally weren't they all slalom paddlers at some point in their development (I know for certain that Jones and Fox were, i find it hard given the time frames to believe Loel and Baker didn't have experience in that area too.)? Maybe we should instead suggest everyone spend at least two seasons trying to get to div 2 before they really embark on any other whitewater paddling?* ;)

The hull with edges is a useful training tool, now that edge control is a bread and butter skill, a paddler might as well learn from day one... All the paddlers you mention pre-date the planing hull, and some of them may even pre-date the slicy sterned slalom boat (the first boats in which the design enabled them to be "edgy"), so whilst yes they did manage to get good at paddling, they got good at a type of paddling somewhat different to that of today, and those who remain have had a gradual progression to get used to the new generation[s] of boats and techniques.

The slicy sterned boat with edges (preferable fairly gentle ones like [gen2 onward] inazones, redlines etc.) provide potentially the best platform to quickly develop without too much external input... It's not for everyone in paddling, but there's a good chance that if someone is enthusiastic enough to be spending their free time asking for advice on a canoeing website, that they have the kind of enthusiasm to desire that quick development and put in the effort it needs.

*I've just had a thought that's perhaps even better, everyone should learn in open canoes, after all:
Nolan Whitesell wrote:The thing about open canoeing is, you wanna know if you had a great run or an alright run? The answer is there in the bottom of the boat! You don't get that kind of feedback in a kayak.
ONE BLADE, ONE LOVE, [TOO] MANY PIES


Joshua Kelly

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