Go-pro - which mounts?

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Poke
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Go-pro - which mounts?

Post by Poke »

A bit of a two part question...

I don't have a Go-Pro Camera. If I were to get one to compliment hand-held footage from an expedition I was going on, which of the mount types would you recommend? I'm thinking that Surf or Helmet would be the best bet? If we had the budget to get two, would you get one of each, or both of the same type? We're wanting to get as many different angles as possible out of these, so any tips on attaching (to Pyranha Everests, incidentally) would be awesome.

Second part... Are there different types of Go-Pro camera? i.e. some which have a review screen on the back, and others that don't. If I was going on a long multiday trip, which would you recommend (I'm thinking battery life here, vs the advantages of being able to review the footage)?

Cheers all!
Tim
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TheKrikkitWars
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Re: Go-pro - which mounts?

Post by TheKrikkitWars »

From what I understand from boating with several people who've gone unassailably cuckcoo for the idea of the go-pro, these are the only half decent mounts for paddling purposes, and if you want a decent boat mount for "chasing" footage of boat and paddler, you need to build a pole with a suitable mounting screw onto your rear grab handle.

The review back is an optional extra you purchase and intstall onto the current range of go-pro's; you can also install a battery pack in the same way.
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Re: Go-pro - which mounts?

Post by 4starmike »

I'd suggest going for the helmet option, as it comes with a range of arms & adhesive mounts to play with & adapt with.

I'd suggest the Handle Bar mount, to which you can then attach the pole to a Boom, a grab handle or a paddle to get some closer up and different angle shots. I've used it on a trekking pole, as it was easy to disassemble and fits in the back of most of my boats too. You can adjust the length, to your requirements too. A simple but strong length of cord, the maximum length of the pole and a little longer to hold that gives me the peace of mind, that I'd still have the camera, if something happens to the pole. Me and a friend are in the process of finishing off a chase boat mount, which I'm looking to either use the above mount or the tripod mount, to attach the camera to.

The chest mount is also a nice piece of kit, to which I've only really used for another angle or if someone borrows the camera and doesn't have a mount on their helmet. Does come in handy for biking too though. The paddle does get in the way, but it's still a nice angle to play with, especially if you want to avoid the helmet camera look on a video. I've used the plastic buckle mount that comes with it, more on my helmet mount though, as it gives a larger area to play with. Plus you'd be able to, do some nice self portrait shots (like on the Yak Advert), with another arm & this buckle mount, if that's the style you want to shoot with.

The tripod mount has come in handy too, allowing the camera to be attached to a dolly or a tripod, for some pans or a timelapse shoot. I used a cheap suction mount from an old phone cradle from 7DS and the head strap mount you get from the Helmet package, to make a good window mount, which works nicely for a video or timelapse in a vehicle or suitable surface & means the camera stays in a fixed, steady position.

If you buy or make a simple steadicam stabilizer for the GoPro, then you'll be able to use it as a hand held camera, giving you a smooth and fluid movement. Just holding the camera itself, means you get those jolts when moving around and turning the camera too.

I don't have any of the additional rear packs as yet, but I'd have thought the screen would only be useful for a steadicam purpose or making sure you've got the shot you want on say a boom or a tripod. The additional battery would certainly come in handy, for longer day trips & time lapses.
Mike
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Jim
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Re: Go-pro - which mounts?

Post by Jim »

If your arent getting the review back, do plenty of practices in the boat on similar grade water beforehand to get the hang of what angle to position the camera at (and then mark it somehow) - otherwise you may be disappointed with what you actually film and not know until you get home. That said the go-pro has a much wider field of view than my old ATC2K so you are unlikely to miss the action (as I did so often in the grand canyon) but it might be all in the top or bottom of the frame. I say to paddle similar type of water when setting up - it is obvious in my canyon footage that the angle is high but almost useable when paddling on the flat, but as soon as I reach a rapid, I tilt my head back as I stretch to see as far as possible downstream, and mostly shoot the sky.....

Now that my ATC2K has died (impossible to make it turn on most of the time) without ever producing satisfactory footage, I might have to get a go-pro and try making videos again - they are clearly in a different league, very impressive! I guess my biggest issue was not having regular camera footage to mix in and make an interesting film - I should really do things more properly all round!

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Re: Go-pro - which mounts?

Post by box2k2 »

Helmet should do you fine, and grab the handlebar mount for some extra angles. Might be worth buying a load of extra mounts too.

The helmet stuff is pretty obvious.

Stick a mount on the bow for this type:
http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set= ... 360&type=1

On the stern for this:
http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set= ... 360&type=1

Mounts seem very solid too. Passed the back of the boat through a small undercut, and it stayed on the boat:


Mount on your paddle for this:


And I've been playing with the handlebar mount on my paddle for panning shots. I'll upload something and be right back.

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Re: Go-pro - which mounts?

Post by box2k2 »

Here you go:


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Re: Go-pro - which mounts?

Post by geyrfugl »

Don't go for stick-on mounts you can't move (or at least, don't rely on them exclusively). I use a sucker (the sort for lifting panes of glass - pretty cheap on ebay) for on-boat mounts, and I have a wooden mount that bolts to all sorts of places, including the sucker, a pole, and my helmet. The sucker is very easily moved, and as long as the boat surface is neither textured, nor too curved, it sticks well enough that the handle will smash off before the suction lets go. The camera typically survives, but the lens can scratch if it meets enough rock, to take some spare lens kits, and perhaps a complete spare housing (they are cheap enough, especially the spare lenses). The bit of wood with the stripey tape on (below) was sawn off for helmet-mounting - it used to stick the mount into the end of some plastic waste pipe on another sucker mount, but that wasn't really rigid enough. Mostly, helmet mounted footage is most useful, as long as your paddler isn't someone who is constantly looking right and left for buddies and eddies, but it gets monotonous, so you want to mix in some other angles. I helmet-mount on the front (where a headlamp would be if it was a caving helmet). I find footage from the side of a helmet looks odd, and the viewpoint from top of helmet is too high (and catches on low branches a lot)-:

Image

One issue I've found is that the Go-Pro takes an unreasonable amount of notice of the sky, and is very prone to under-expose if pointed to include much sky - especially when it's overcast. Experiment to find the angle which keeps the footage bright enough to actually see what's going on. As a clue, the camera in the pic above was pointing a bit too high. I'm using the Hero HD here, mostly in 1280x960p30,and occasionally in 1280x720p60. The former means you can point the camera down a bit more to minimise sky, then crop the bottom off the picture for 1280x720 footage when combined with other cameras and the 60 fps footage.

Oh, tie it on too ! They don't float...

Andy

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Re: Go-pro - which mounts?

Post by dirtbiker »

Interesting - I hadn't thought of using a sucker-based mount for paddling (currently contemplating one for using on the car though)

Could you post up a couple of photos of your wooden mount? Good tip on the exposure too - cheers.

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