Paddlesport trade

Inland paddling
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Mark R
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Paddlesport trade

Post by Mark R »

'The UK paddlesport gear industry delivers fairly priced products featuring excellent design and production standards, as well as playing an active and generous role in the sport's development'

Yay or nay?
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*Guy*
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Post by *Guy* »

whats the word limit?

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paddlersteve
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Post by paddlersteve »

In my opinion as a one word answer "Yay"

But to break it down further:
'The UK paddlesport gear industry delivers fairly priced products
A bit ambiguous, what is "fairly priced"? If you look the design and set up costs of a new design of product, add to that the acceleration of development and shortening product lifecycles, then Yay. Compare a piece of plastic or clothing to other sports: consider the complexities and sheer number of components of a mountain bike compared with its cost, or top of the range mountaineering clothing then perhaps Nay. But a relatively small sport needs to recoup costs from fewer people. The real indication of fair price is perhaps the manufactures and retailers status. Take Kogg, high quality gear, comparibly priced, ceased trading. Other large UK retailers and manufactures are (from what I hear rumours of) not in the strongest financial position, not on the ragged edge perhaps but relatively small and stead levels of profit. My answer Yay!

featuring excellent design
Definately Yay, for a country with natural resources needed for paddling, (ie rivers) that are comparable at best, look at the number of top quality designers and manufactures in the UK
and production standards
Again Yay, all manufactures have products with flaws that appear over time, beit in materials, design or outfitting, but in general they are rare and most have excellent after sales service
as well as playing an active and generous role in the sport's development'

Again a Yay, How many events, activities etc do our manufactures & retailers support around the UK and abroad, freestyle, touring, expedition, olympic disciplines, beginners events, kids/youth events etc etc


Any other thoughts?

Steve

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Adrian Cooper
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Post by Adrian Cooper »

Steve, you seem to have said it all, leaving little for anyone else. The only small point I would like to consider further is the use of the word 'generous' in the sport's development. I know there are many companies advertising at events, I know they provide sponsored paddlers with free or cut priced kit but I don't know just how much support there is for the sport generally. The one who seems to stand out head and shoulders above the rest is Pete Astles at Peak who does an enormous job of work on the Challenges. Does anyone else put this amount of effort into sport development?

Adrian

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Ed Hopper
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well...

Post by Ed Hopper »

I think "Yay" as well. Succinctly put the reason I can say this with some confidence is that I do not know any people involved in the boating industry who make pots of cash - no sports cars, no mansions, no yachts.

From this we can infer that they are not making excessive or unreasonable profits from the sport.

This, in my opinion, is a bit of a shame as money is a wonderful thing, but as Mr. Soulboater mentioned a few days ago on TWP, kayakers are the tightest out of all of the outdoor sports enthusiasts and as such getting any cash out of them is an absolute bugg3r.


Laters,



Ed.

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Jim
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Post by Jim »

Generally yes, with the proviso that I'm not convinced we pay a fair price for many goods of any type in the UK, but that is due to a difficult economic situation not the paddlesport industry.

It is definitely true that developments in kit have either driven or supported development in the sport for many years now, we wouldn't have the sport we have now if we still had the kit we had in the 70's!

JIM

nwilko (not logged in)

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Post by nwilko (not logged in) »

Price ?
Generally its advertised and sold at a price people will pay !
Is it worth that amount, as they bought it you could say yes ? is it worth it in relative terms ? hmmn depends. Paddlers with deeper pockets are more inclined to think so.

richardlsharpe

Post by richardlsharpe »

Steve wrote,
bit ambiguous, what is "fairly priced"? If you look the design and set up costs of a new design of product, add to that the acceleration of development and shortening product lifecycles, then Yay
A cynic might ask if the shortening life cycle of products is driven by the manufacturers...not unlike football teams bringing out new shirts every season.

OK, so we all like to be cool and have the latest boats, so perhaps we get the manufacturers we deserve.

Wouldn't another view on this issue be that, given the ferocity of promotion of "new and improved" boat design (volume pods and fins, anyone?) which need a whole new model, relaunch at a hefty mark up, and then susequent discounts to a more sustainable price 9 months down the lifecycle, we would be fair to argue we are a gullible bunch being taken for a ride?

Is a 2005 creek boat really that different to a 2001 model?

Convince me I'm wrong.

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Ed Hopper
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advances

Post by Ed Hopper »

A cynic might ask if the shortening life cycle of products is driven by the manufacturers
This is unlikely in the case of boat design as a result of the huge cost of initial set up, marketing, distribution etc etc all for a boat which might not sell. Look at the RPM - still piling out of the shop doors. Look at the G-Force - everyone loves them. Look at the InaZone and S6 - kept on selling for years and years.

Each of these boats represents almost pure profit for the manufacturer as all the initial set up and R&D costs have been covered. Manufacturers, therefore, would LOVE not to have to pile out a new boat every year but competitive forces mean that they have to.

Luckily, nobody actually HAS to buy a new boat every year unless they break thir old one.


Laters,



Ed.

richardlsharpe

Post by richardlsharpe »

erm, no.

Once I buy my boat, the nice people at the manufacturers recoup their R+D etc, which is all factored into the cost of production and net profit...

However, they don't make any more cash out of me (or you) until they convince us that we need a new one (back to the volume pods and fins.)

Bringing a new boat out every year presents the opportunty to get us to upgrade. which equals a new, high margin sale (otherwise they can only sell us small ticket items like hats and bottles etc)

I'm not suggesting that this is some evil plot - it is standard business practice - see windows 3.1 to 2003, but it seems a little odd to think we are doing dagger a favour by buying their new boats.

After all, with all their R+D costs to recoup after designing a boat even easier to *insert cool trick that i am not cool enough to know about here* buying the boat is the least we can do.

Please.

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