River Knives

Inland paddling
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Grumpy Fisherman
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River Knives

Post by Grumpy Fisherman »

After reading the thread on safety kit, it reminded me I need a river knife. What do people reckon are good to buy? Im looking for a folding jobbie. Any suggestions?

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lozbrown
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Post by lozbrown »

if its sharp and it folds and locks it's all good

just make sure you can open it with one hand

some people recomend knives without a point on the end, personally i disagree

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Post by Poke »

lozbrown wrote:some people recomend knives without a point on the end, personally i disagree
Not saying that having a point at the end is a bad thing.. But the flat end (i've found) is more useful... Have used it as a screwdriver in the past...

Mine is one of the fixed ones.. No folding away means theres less chance of catch your fingers.. which is nice..
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neilfarmer
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Post by neilfarmer »

You can use the side of the knife for a screwdiver.
'Pointy knives' have come under scrutiny from the scottish exec and surgeons, should people have them?
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Rockrat
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Knives

Post by Rockrat »

Hia,

I've just got back from UK Canoes and i bought the £12.99 Folding Rescue Knive. Image It's lightweight and easy to open, and close for that matter.

There was an interesting article on the news yesterday about kitche knives and how A & E departments want to ban the manufacturing of 'pointy' knives because of the amount of stab victims they treat, chef's said pointy knives are not needed. So do paddlers need pointy knives, because i can't see the reason behind the point?
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Post by Grumpy Fisherman »

Hi Rockrat

Have seen the Folding Rescue Blade in my research... cant tell from the pic though, does it have a thumb stud for opening? I know it may be easy to open while warm and dry, but do you reckon you would be able to open / use it when the sh*t hits the fan?

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TomW
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By far the best folding knife I've seen before is:

Post by TomW »

The Gerber EZ out rescue knife.

As seen half way down the following page:

http://www.shop4gerber.co.uk/ltr.html

2 main reasons - Firstly it's very easy to open one handed, and secondly it's super sharp. Made of sergical steel it cuts strong, thick rope like a knife through butter, even when there is very little tension on the rope. Tested this personally.

My own personal reccomendation, having owned several knives in the past that would either be crap in a real situation or have rusted at the folding pivot (Typhoon/similar knives.) within 1-2 years.
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Rockrat
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Post by Rockrat »

Grumpy Fisherman wrote:Hi Rockrat

Have seen the Folding Rescue Blade in my research... cant tell from the pic though, does it have a thumb stud for opening? I know it may be easy to open while warm and dry, but do you reckon you would be able to open / use it when the sh*t hits the fan?
The hole in the blade allows you to pinch your thumb and finger together whilst gripping the knive to open it. Therefore i think it should be easy to open even when its cold and needed quickly.

I'll post again after Wednesday when i've been to the Washburn - i'll try opening it after spending two hours on the water and see how easy it is!
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James Hartley
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Post by James Hartley »

The knife I carry is a folding one made by beretta. It has a thumb stud that can be used by either hand, is sharp, quick to get to work, high quality and works well. I got it from the bargin section of www.heinnie.com which is where I know get all my blades from. They have a wide selecton, i even got the blade I use at work from here. Some of which are highly unsuitable for day to day work. Sheathed blades, to folding locking ones, you name it, they have them.
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Post by Terryg »

Rockrats knife looks like a Whitby product to me.

Mine has the same handle, but a curved blade.
Brilliant knife, very easy to open and close with one cold wet hand, locking blade, and cuts anything I ask it to.

Only negative point is mine has a steel rivet which has developed a coating of rust over the years. Hopefully later ones use a more suitable metal!

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Post by James F »

pointy knives are better for baguettes.

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Post by lozbrown »

James Hartley wrote: I got it from the bargin section of www.heinnie.com which is where I know get all my blades from.
what there still really exspensive, i use one of these exactly like that but i bought it from my local too shop for 4 quid, razor sharp really strong, has thumb stud and cheap

river knife should be one your not afraid to loose, damage, or throw away if needs be

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Re: River Knives

Post by waverley610 »

Grumpy Fisherman wrote: What do people reckon are good to buy? Im looking for a folding jobbie. Any suggestions?
would anyone like to also recommend a non-folding knife to attach to a BA that doesn't have an attachment point?

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Tom Saffell
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hmm

Post by Tom Saffell »

just thought had to chip in my €0.02 worth on this one, as i used my knife at the weekend.

i have a gerber river shorty, and i must say, it was perfectly up to the job. sharp, no folding issues, quick and easy to access - job done with consumate ease.

then again, gruyere is quite soft.

tom saffell

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Re: River Knives

Post by Grumpy Fisherman »

Hmmm, am rethinking the folding idea. Like the look of the Gerber blades, people seem to like the Shorty. Any other opinions on this one?
waverley610 wrote:would anyone like to also recommend a non-folding knife to attach to a BA that doesn't have an attachment point?
Probably best to stick it in a BA poket anyway, that way its not gonna get snagged or lost.

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Post by Tom_Laws »

James F wrote:pointy knives are better for baguettes.
and stabbing rafts...... and opening tins and cartons

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Post by hhzoombird »

my knife has a pointy end.
it was v useful at the weekend for getting limpits off rocks to eat for my tea.
it was also v usefult for stabbing my own hand with while getting limpits off rocks - you can't stab it half so well with a blunt end.
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jonl
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pointy knives

Post by jonl »

Just checked up on the news item saying that pointy knives are not needed in the kitchen as this surprised me somewhat. The report actually asks for the withdrawal of long pointy knives, as when a point is needed a short knife is as good as a long knife.
I prefer pointy knives, but the most important thing is some serration as this will speed cutting rope. I would also advocate using your knife for your bread and cheese on the side of the river, as this ensures you know it is in good condition when you pull it out of your ba in an emergency.

choire_dog

Post by choire_dog »

I like to cover all angles and keep everone happy, esp. the PC brigade

I carry a folder with a pointy end and 2 fixed, one blunt screwdriver end, and the other with a semi pointy end.

I'm just an ameinable sort of chap really. The only problem I have is knowing which one to produce in the presence of any given individual.

If I get the 'wrong' one for their 'sense' of political correctness I just keep pulling them out until they either smile when I get to the right one, or they run a mile thinking I'm some kind of nutter. (which I am, but not that kind).

(And all my kitchen knives have pointy ends.)

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Post by AndyK »

ive got that one in the pic owen but with a curved blade. the hole makes it easy to open and the curve is good for cutting things that requie a bit of force as it cant slide out. crap for spreading garlic cheese though

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Converting pointy-knives

Post by Rockrat »

Hia,

I've got a pointy knife but am thinking it might be better to have a blunt end on it. How would i go about doing this?
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James Hartley
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Post by James Hartley »

By a fresh new knife ;-) You could use a grinding wheel instead for a cheaper alternative
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Post by Guest »

Find someone with a small grinding wheel used for sharpening tools etc, and grind away! Make sure you don't catch the blade on the grinding wheel, but drag it underneath the wheel.

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Grumpy Fisherman
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Post by Grumpy Fisherman »

Have gone for the Gerber River Shorty... will post when it arrives on first impressions... could be a while before I get to test it!

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Post by Grumpy Fisherman »

Ooo tis a lot blunter than i thought... no sharp simple edge, which thinking about it is a very good idea.

Two serrated sections, one on either side... one sharper than the other, and more highly serrated.

Good, blunt tip, looks ideal for screwdriver jobs. Build quality looks fantastic, and it feels really good in the hand, very well designed all-round.

Overall = impressed.

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Andy jacko
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River knives

Post by Andy jacko »

I am thinking of getting a river knife but I'll have to get it soon coz there bring in new laws stopping anyone under 18 buying a knife. I suppose I could get my dad to get it for me tho.

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Post by Rockrat »

I got my dad to buy mine because i thought anyone 16 or younger couldn't purchase a knive.
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Post by Steve B »

I had to do some packaging artwork for a product which included a scalpel last year sometime. It was no under 16s according to the information we had then.
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Post by James Hartley »

I was under the impression, that the law change hadn't yet come in to effect and that as long as you where 16 or over, you could still purchase one. However the have been calls for changes to move the age up to 18, and an increase in tighter controls on the sales of blades, but as of yet, don't think the changes are in. I might be wrong on this, so don't take this as gospel!
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Post by Jim »

The Gerber river shorty is ideal, you would almost think it is designed for the purpose. I only recall one serrated side, and it was razor sharp on mine, excellent for slicing through rope at high speed. The sheath is reasonably retentive, but beware the knife can come out unintentionally, which is why I no longer have it (lost at sea). Personally I prefer to keep knives in pockets away from prying eyes and snagging potential (my pocket was unzipped when I lost the knife) which should prevent loss.

The tip is not the right profile for a screwdriver. The blade shape seems well thought out for preventing accidental cutting, the serrations are effectively set back in the blade with all other edges being blunt, meaning you have to be fairly deliberate about how you use it. The shape also makes it very bad for cutting bread and cheese!

A knife is like any other sharp tool, you should look after it if you want it to last and work when you need it. To me this means rinsing it from time to time (especially if it goes in salt water for any reason), and it means not dulling the blade by using it to cut bread and cheese. Unless you are experienced in sharpening serrated knives you should avoid unnessecary use. Apparantly Ray Mears recommends sharpening blades immediately every time you use them so you know they are good. If you can't sharpen it, the best policy would seem to be to not use it but keep it clean, and possibly lightly oiled or WD40d (water repellant).

JIM

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