Shoulder surgeon in Edinburgh

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tom_lewis89
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Shoulder surgeon in Edinburgh

Post by tom_lewis89 » Mon Feb 07, 2011 3:04 pm

Hey,

Was wondering if anyone has had experience of shoulder surgery in/around Edinburgh and what they thought of the surgeon/treatment in general. I dislocated my shoulder for a second time on Saturday and probably will end up getting sliced and diced soon. Does anyone know if there is any place you can find success rates for doctors.

Cheers,

Tom

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tomcrow99
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Re: Shoulder surgeon in Edinburgh

Post by tomcrow99 » Mon Feb 07, 2011 10:17 pm

I had my collar bone bolted back together by a surgeon at the royal called Mr Robinson. He did a fantastic job and is apparently one of the best in the country. I think he also did Dave Mcraw's dislocated shoulder.

To be honest I don't know how much choices you get in these matters on the nhs...

Hope this helps

Tom

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james fleming
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Re: Shoulder surgeon in Edinburgh

Post by james fleming » Mon Feb 07, 2011 10:57 pm

tom_lewis89 wrote:Hey,

Was wondering if anyone has had experience of shoulder surgery in/around Edinburgh and what they thought of the surgeon/treatment in general. I dislocated my shoulder for a second time on Saturday and probably will end up getting sliced and diced soon. Does anyone know if there is any place you can find success rates for doctors.

Cheers,

Tom

Drop this dude a line...Bewildered sassanack (Tony), here. He should be able to help.

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SwamP
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Re: Shoulder surgeon in Edinburgh

Post by SwamP » Mon Feb 07, 2011 11:28 pm

Sorry bout your shoulder Tom.

One of your mates asked me on facebook to recommend someone but I've never had the op....but would back all advice so far!

For physio the fasic chicks at Edinburgh Uni Pleasance are pretty good.

Get to a physio now if you haven't been already.
Lets not try to understand each other. Thanks.

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Bewildered sassanack
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Re: Shoulder surgeon in Edinburgh

Post by Bewildered sassanack » Mon Feb 07, 2011 11:59 pm

Sunil Sharma -NHS Fife and Spire Murrayfield Edinburgh.

Been working with him for 3 or 4 years. Excellent........

........Although I would be doing your Anaesthetic, so that may put you off! But at least you would have a paddler rooting for you at one end of the table.
Can I get stabilisers for this?

www.stirlingcanoeclub.info

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Bewildered sassanack
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Re: Shoulder surgeon in Edinburgh

Post by Bewildered sassanack » Tue Feb 08, 2011 12:10 am

Hopefully you may find this a little more useful than the usual advice based on personal experience (n=1) on here. It may also help to explain why different people get different advice re surgery, but the waters are still muddy:


Surgical versus non-surgical treatment for acute anterior shoulder dislocation - Cochrane Review

Handoll HH, Almaiyah MA, Rangan A.

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Acute anterior shoulder dislocation is the commonest type of shoulder dislocation. Subsequently, the shoulder is less stable and more susceptible to re-dislocation, especially in active young adults.

OBJECTIVES: We aimed to compare surgical versus non-surgical treatment for acute anterior dislocation of the shoulder.

SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Musculoskeletal Injuries Group specialised register (August 2003), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library Issue 3, 2003), MEDLINE (1966 to September week 3 2003), EMBASE (1988 to 2003 week 39), the National Research Register (UK) (Issue 3, 2003), conference proceedings and reference lists of articles.

SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing surgical with conservative interventions for treating acute anterior shoulder dislocation.

DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Selection of the included trials was by all three reviewers. Two reviewers independently assessed methodological quality and extracted data. Where appropriate, results of comparable studies were pooled.

MAIN RESULTS: Five studies were included. These involved a total of 239 young (mainly aged around 22 years) active and mainly male people, all of whom had had a primary (first time) traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation. Methodological quality was variable, but notably there was insufficient information to judge whether allocation was effectively concealed in all five trials. Two trials, involving 115 participants, were only reported in conference abstracts.One trial involving military personnel reported that all had returned to active duty. Another trial reported similar numbers in the two intervention groups with reduced sports participation, and a third trial reported that significantly fewer people in the surgical group failed to attain previous levels of sports activity.Pooled results from all five trials showed that subsequent instability, either redislocation or subluxation, was statistically significantly less frequent in the surgical group (relative risk (RR) 0.20; 95%confidence interval (CI) 0.11 to 0.33). This result remained statistically significant (RR 0.32, 95%CI 0.17 to 0.59) for the three trials reported in full. Half (17/33) of the conservatively treated patients with shoulder instability in these three trials opted for subsequent surgery.Different, mainly patient-rated, functional assessment measures for the shoulder were recorded in the five trials. The results were more favourable, usually statistically significantly so, in the surgically treated group.Aside from a septic joint in a surgically treated patient, there were no other treatment complications reported. There was no information on shoulder pain, long-term complications such as osteoarthritis or on service utilisation and resource use.

REVIEWER'S CONCLUSIONS: The limited evidence available supports primary surgery for young adults, usually male, engaged in highly demanding physical activities who have sustained their first acute traumatic shoulder dislocation. There is no evidence available to determine whether non-surgical treatment should not remain the prime treatment option for other categories of patient. Sufficiently powered, good quality and adequately reported randomised trials of good standard surgical treatment versus good standard conservative treatment for well-defined injuries are required; in particular, for patient categories at lower risk of activity-limiting recurrence. Long term surveillance of outcome, looking at shoulder disorders including osteoarthritis is also required. Reviews comparing different surgical interventions and different conservative interventions including rehabilitation are needed.
Can I get stabilisers for this?

www.stirlingcanoeclub.info

Dave McCraw
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Re: Shoulder surgeon in Edinburgh

Post by Dave McCraw » Tue Feb 08, 2011 12:05 pm

I know I replied on Facebook but, for the benefit of anybody else who may be in the same situation and arrive here by search - yes, Mr Robinson did my shoulder, and it hasn't given my any trouble since, and I dislocated it in 2006.

On the face of it, quite a good result (although I hardly paddle at all compared with back then, so my exposure is quite different).

Personally I think that part of the value of surgery is that it forces you to take your rehabilitation seriously. After you've been in a sling for however long, your arm will no longer work properly and you *have* to fix it through a bit of hard graft. If you just get it popped back in at A&E and a list of physio exercises - well, how many people honestly do them, rigorously and regularly?

However, another point I'd make is that I had terrible physio support through the NHS - probably because they are geared towards rehabilitating you to driving, typing and using a kettle (and tbh this is fair enough). After "finishing" my NHS physio I did one run of the Etive and felt like my shoulder was in a worse state than before I started!

In the end I went to Space in Edinburgh (just along from Haymarket) who were really awesome. Expensive but worth every penny - I now use them to keep me on the bike.

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SwamP
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Re: Shoulder surgeon in Edinburgh

Post by SwamP » Tue Feb 08, 2011 12:12 pm

Dave McCraw wrote: how many people honestly do them, rigorously and regularly?
Everyone I know who's dislocated their shoulder.

Interesting stuff Tony. If (when) mine pops again I'll definitely give you a shout :)
Lets not try to understand each other. Thanks.

Ian.Adey
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Re: Shoulder surgeon in Edinburgh

Post by Ian.Adey » Tue Feb 08, 2011 4:27 pm

Try looking at this website, It was recomondaed by my GP

Its Fairly self explanetry and has loads of deatailed information and a collection of moderm journals.

Possibly more importantly there is a surch facility to find Physios who are interested in / specialise in Shoulder injurys.

http://www.shoulderdoc.co.uk

Good Luck

Ian
Guiding and Coaching in the Lakes,UK & Europe

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Bewildered sassanack
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Re: Shoulder surgeon in Edinburgh

Post by Bewildered sassanack » Tue Feb 08, 2011 5:26 pm

Whoever you choose for your surgery, the main determining factor should be: Are they a shoulder specialist or a general orthopod who dabbles in shoulders when he's not whacking in a new hip/knee. Unless the chaps doing >100 shoulders/year then look elsewhere.
Can I get stabilisers for this?

www.stirlingcanoeclub.info

Halox
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Re: Shoulder surgeon in Edinburgh

Post by Halox » Tue Feb 08, 2011 5:52 pm

For those of you in Scotland and N England I would recommend Tam Cowan. He works miracles. Very reasonably priced too. He is based in Livingston.

http://www.tomcowan.co.uk/tom/tom_home.html

tom_lewis89
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Re: Shoulder surgeon in Edinburgh

Post by tom_lewis89 » Wed Feb 16, 2011 12:28 am

Thanks for all the advice everybody. I'm currently waiting to be seen by a consultant to see what his opinion is. Cheers! Tom

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