Paddle kit??

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AGS
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Paddle kit??

Post by AGS »

Following some recent epics on the river, I was wondering what everyones opinion was of the minimum kit that should be taken on the water per person and between the group - I know I need to be carrying more but how much is too much??

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Tom_Laws
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Post by Tom_Laws »

Westgarth (or maybe Dave Carrol) -


"Don't carry shit"

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Simon Westgarth
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Post by Simon Westgarth »

Tom_Laws wrote:Westgarth (or maybe Dave Carrol) -
Yes me too, I always take Westgarth and often have a Dave Carroll too.

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Post by AGS »

Tom_Laws wrote:Westgarth (or maybe Dave Carrol) -


"Don't carry shit"
Will carrying these affect the performance of my boat??

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Simon Westgarth
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Post by Simon Westgarth »

AGS wrote:
Tom_Laws wrote:Westgarth (or maybe Dave Carrol)
Will carrying these affect the performance of my boat??
Some what....

OK, take as little as you can, yet all that you need.

Personal Safety Gear:
Throw bag
Sling & crab
Knife & Whistle
Mobile Phone in water proof bag

Personal Rescue Gear:
Wrap kit, to make pig rig; 2 crabs, sling & prusik

Gear in your boat:
Hat (Swimmer's cap) & a pair of socks (use as gloves & fits everyone)
Multi Tool
First Aid kit: (2 different sized pads and tape)
High energy food (Bag of Haribo)

Group Gear:
Splits
Group Shelter

Adding to the above is addition weight, as gear lists continually change.

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Sophie King
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Post by Sophie King »

I carry as little as possible. A bit naughty I know but regularly I will only carry:
20m throwline in my boat
sling in my BA
a knife
a whistle and a couple of carabinas

Things I know I should be carrying in additon:
A mobile
1st aid kit
pullys
a second line on me?..............the list goes on.

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meatballs
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Post by meatballs »

If you put on late a little headtorch could be useful.

Si, your personal gear to be carried on you at all times; in BA etc?
Ben

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Andywillson
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Post by Andywillson »

Sophie King wrote:I carry as little as possible. A bit naughty I know but regularly I will only carry:
20m throwline in my boat
sling in my BA
a knife
a whistle and a couple of carabinas

Things I know I should be carrying in additon:
A mobile
1st aid kit
pullys
a second line on me?..............the list goes on.
Im sure if you look like you do in your photo, the lads in your group will be throwing gear at you!

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Simon Westgarth
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Post by Simon Westgarth »

meatballs wrote:Si, your personal gear to be carried on you at all times; in BA etc?
I carried the Knife and Whistle in the PFD pocket.
The Sling & crab, is gathered up and tucked inside the spray deck tunnel, and not placed around my waist.
My Mobile Phone in a water proof bag is in the Drysuit/top pocket, the phone is less likely to be damaged this way.
My throwbag is on a quick release belt around my waist.

All the other gear highlighted in my above post is on the boat, accessible when I am on the bank.

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Performance Kayaks
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Post by Performance Kayaks »

Tom_Laws wrote:(or maybe Dave Carrol)
I think that a Dave Carrol should be on every ones list. It makes life more entertaining!

It seems that it's one of the first thing that most of the ladies ask for on a trip though?
Last edited by Performance Kayaks on Tue Nov 04, 2008 12:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by garya »

a couple of those snap light sticks in white and green.

I keep them in my first aid kit as they last forever and will give you light when you need it without worring about batteries. you can also tie them onto things as markers in case you need to get back to a spot in the dark (crowded campsite ??). If you tie them on a piece of string and wizz them round your head they also make very effective becons to attract attention.

flask with warm drink
lighter + few solid fuel blocks

I am not suggesting we burn down the contryside but if the shit really hits the fan and you are stuck out in cold and dark for a couple of hours waiting for help the ability to light small fire may mean the difference between hypothermia and going home.. needs must.

As for boat handling.. try and distribute the kit around the group, I also trimmed my seat forward a little from when the boat is empty which helps stop the boat from becoming too tail happy.


Gary

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Simon Westgarth
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Post by Simon Westgarth »

garya wrote:a couple of those snap light sticks in white and green.

I keep them in my first aid kit as they last forever and will give you light when you need it without worring about batteries. you can also tie them onto things as markers in case you need to get back to a spot in the dark (crowded campsite ??). If you tie them on a piece of string and wizz them round your head they also make very effective becons to attract attention.

flask with warm drink
lighter + few solid fuel blocks
All useful but not necessary at all.

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Post by Robson »

simon d westgarth wrote:
garya wrote:a couple of those snap light sticks in white and green.
Useful but not necessary at all.
They are if you're heading to a rave after paddling.

(Lyn & Glyn's Kev?)
Can't think of anything to say in less than 50 cha

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Sophie King
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Post by Sophie King »

Yes andy it is me in my photo. Rescue wise my boyfriend is usually close by on the river making sure I am ok, he is also a paddler. xxx

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janet brown
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Post by janet brown »

garya wrote: As for boat handling.. try and distribute the kit around the group
Gary
If paddling the Ardeche in summer and carrying loads of water as recommended,
don't put around 5 litres in one side of a Fluid Flirt: you tend to paddle permanently on one edge!

Janet

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Ross W
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Post by Ross W »

Sophie King wrote:Yes andy it is me in my photo. Rescue wise my boyfriend is usually close by on the river making sure I am ok, he is also a paddler. xxx
Plus he is a decent paddler and has rescued a couple times
Dartmoor / Plymouth based
www.rosswildman.co.uk

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Post by buck197 »

Ross W wrote:Plus he is a decent paddler and has rescued a couple times
Does he carry a stitching kit?????
Brian Taylor
Paddle Pirates

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Post by husky »

I would like in my kit
1 X Jon Davies
Great for rescues, having a laugh with, downing a few beers,spot on coaching, and watching him paddle it motivates me to get better.
Job done
Steve
LET IT BE

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Rick Foster
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Post by Rick Foster »

Aww bless...

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Post by husky »

Rick Foster wrote:Aww bless...
Your not so bad ether Rick and much more cuddly ;-)
Steve
LET IT BE

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Liam Kirkham
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Post by Liam Kirkham »

simon d westgarth wrote: Personal Rescue Gear:
Wrap kit, to make pig rig; 2 crabs, sling & prusik
Do you keep this on yoursef or clipped into your boat?

Any diagrams or pictures of a pig rig as I'm unclear.

On a WWSR course next week so im sure I'll be refreshed.

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James Hartley
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Post by James Hartley »

Liam Kirkham wrote:
simon d westgarth wrote: Personal Rescue Gear:
Wrap kit, to make pig rig; 2 crabs, sling & prusik
Do you keep this on yoursef or clipped into your boat?

Any diagrams or pictures of a pig rig as I'm unclear.

On a WWSR course next week so im sure I'll be refreshed.
Get your self a copy of Franco'e white water Safety and rescue, it is all in there ;-)
The more apparently complex an act, the more vital it is to search until you find its inner simplicity
Feed the rat

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Post by Pete »

Personally, I go for the Adam Harmer, used him a lot this year and paddled some stuff that I wouldn't have dreamed of paddling without him!

THANKS TERRY!!

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Post by meatballs »

Liam Kirkham wrote:
simon d westgarth wrote: Personal Rescue Gear:
Wrap kit, to make pig rig; 2 crabs, sling & prusik
Do you keep this on yoursef or clipped into your boat?

Any diagrams or pictures of a pig rig as I'm unclear.

On a WWSR course next week so im sure I'll be refreshed.
Pig rig = normal lineattached to boat - tied off with a italian hitch on the other end so you can take it in.

Then you have a pulley (of any ratio) attached to the normal rope via a prussik. Pull on pulley, take in slack on normal line.

I need to get myself on a WWSR soon! ><
Ben

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Simon Westgarth
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Post by Simon Westgarth »

Liam Kirkham wrote:
simon d westgarth wrote: Personal Rescue Gear:
Wrap kit, to make pig rig; 2 crabs, sling & prusik
Do you keep this on yoursef or clipped into your boat?

Any diagrams or pictures of a pig rig as I'm unclear.

On a WWSR course next week so im sure I'll be refreshed.
A pig rig is a roping rig that gives you a 4:1 mechanical advantage, and very unlikely to be introduced on a basic WWS&R course. This is normally covered on Advanced WWS&R courses, and used more often on steeper WW.

The gear for the pig rig I keep in my boat, as I will only set one up and use it from the bank.

Here is an image from a rescue website, and pretty much as you would use it, although you do not need all the crabs and pulleys indicated there.
Image

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Liam Kirkham
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Post by Liam Kirkham »

simon d westgarth wrote:
AGS wrote:
Tom_Laws wrote:Westgarth (or maybe Dave Carrol)
Will carrying these affect the performance of my boat??
Some what....

OK, take as little as you can, yet all that you need.

Personal Safety Gear:
Throw bag
Sling & crab
Knife & Whistle
Mobile Phone in water proof bag

Personal Rescue Gear:
Wrap kit, to make pig rig; 2 crabs, sling & prusik

Gear in your boat:
Hat (Swimmer's cap) & a pair of socks (use as gloves & fits everyone)
Multi Tool
First Aid kit: (2 different sized pads and tape)
High energy food (Bag of Haribo)

Group Gear:
Splits
Group Shelter

Adding to the above is addition weight, as gear lists continually change.
No light, snapsticks or torch?

At this time of year with such short days do you consider them not neccesary?

What are peoples thoughts on taking a jet boil when with a club or working with groups?

Some people take a flask which is a little finite. I was considering maybe packing a Jet boil, with some sachets of chocolate and some puri tabs?

This would be for work use and not personal paddling.

E.g Currently working at an outdoor centre working with relative young beginers on grade two rive trips. Or for my 4 star assesment.

I am not too worrried about ben laiden down as I'm still controlling the boat and its on relatively easy water.

So do I really need to be so minamalistic?

Image

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Simon Westgarth
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Post by Simon Westgarth »

Liam Kirkham wrote:No light, snapsticks or torch?

At this time of year with such short days do you consider them not neccesary?

What are peoples thoughts on taking a jet boil when with a club or working with groups?

Some people take a flask which is a little tempoary I was considering maybe packing a Jet boil, with some sachets of chocolate and some puri tabs?

This would be for work use and not personal paddling.
I have never had any opportunity to the use of a torch in UK or any other paddling, I have heard people talk about it, yet if you get on the river in good time you are likely to make the take out in day light. If however you need to stay put, emergency services are within 45mins away at the latest.

A stove in the boat, why? You are not on a multi day trip. What would this benefit yourself or your group? You are highly unlikely to ever use the stove in anger, thus it is very unnecessary.

I take all the gear listed in my original post all of the time, both when personal paddling and when at work on the river.

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Post by dwbald »

A pig rig is a roping rig that gives you a 4:1 mechanical advantage, and very unlikely to be introduced on a basic WWS&R course. This is normally covered on Advanced WWS&R courses, and used more often on steeper WW.

The gear for the pig rig I keep in my boat, as I will only set one up and use it from the bank.

Here is an image from a rescue website, and pretty much as you would use it, although you do not need all the crabs and pulleys indicated there.
Its also called a z type pulley and as pointed out can be made a lot simpler.
And release pressel...
Cheers Dave B

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Post by heybaz »

Liam

Not convinced that there's a need for a stove in the majority of cases, but given a jetboil is self contained and isn't going to cause any real negatives, I'd say why not carry one if that's what you'd like to do? I don't see the need to justify it to anyone but yourself, so if it works for you, go for it. Likewise a thermos, but, as you say, that's a finite number of brews.

As for a headlamp, there are any number of places where one would come in handy when the brown stuff hit the fan. Let's face it, carrying any kit which is non-essential to making progress is a nonsense, right up to the point that it's needed, just like an insurance policy.

Access to a headlamp - which weighs next to nothing and takes up virtually no space - half way down the River Liza at 3:30 pm on a November afternoon when you have just broken an ankle while portaging would be seen by most folk as A Good Thing.

The emergency services are not 45 minutes away. In fact the car, at the bottom of the valley, is an hour away. There is no mobile signal until 15 minutes out of the carpark and the dead-end forestry track along the Ennerdale valley is deserted at the best of times. By the time the MRT or ambulance reach you, at least two hours after you realise you needed them, you'll be glad that you had a brew and a headlamp with you. And you'll avoid the flaming that you'd probably otherwise get for being out there ill-prepared.

Just an opinion...

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