Playboats as a coaching boat?

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Activities Away
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Post by Activities Away »

I hate playboats! Not play boaters you understand - each to their own and all that...

I just think play boats are totally inapproriate for teaching from and any semi decent coach should invest in a suitable boat to use as a teaching platform such as a H3 or Burn.

I will not allow instructors to use Play boats at our centre and they have to use our staff Burns or G3's - no arguements!

I have personally seen trainee instructors who claim to be able to rescue open boat paddlers from a Playboat get it horribly wrong on a cold, wet and windy day - result - two paddlers in the water a lot longer than they should be and a trainee who failed their CST!

Reduce the odds of failing by using a real boat for teaching and save the play boat for pleasure paddling.

Just an opinion you understand!
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TheKrikkitWars
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Post by TheKrikkitWars »

hotrocks wrote:I hate playboats! Not play boaters you understand - each to their own and all that...

I just think play boats are totally inapproriate for teaching from and any semi decent coach should invest in a suitable boat to use as a teaching platform such as a H3 or Burn.

I will not allow instructors to use Play boats at our centre and they have to use our staff Burns or G3's - no arguements!

I have personally seen trainee instructors who claim to be able to rescue open boat paddlers from a Playboat get it horribly wrong on a cold, wet and windy day - result - two paddlers in the water a lot longer than they should be and a trainee who failed their CST!

Reduce the odds of failing by using a real boat for teaching and save the play boat for pleasure paddling.

Just an opinion you understand!
Thats all very easy for you to say, however many recreational coaches are unable to splash out on multiple boats, and most of the larger club boats are worse than useless.
As a result, I'll have to move down the coaching path in my superstar until such time I have the funds to buy a second boat and as a student, that might be a while.

Edit: Do you have anything, anecdotes etc. to back up your theory that playboats impair coaching, can you justify your position more rigorously.
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Post by Dr Repper »

hotrocks wrote:I hate playboats! Not play boaters you understand - each to their own and all that...

I just think play boats are totally inapproriate for teaching from and any semi decent coach should invest in a suitable boat to use as a teaching platform such as a H3 or Burn.

I will not allow instructors to use Play boats at our centre and they have to use our staff Burns or G3's - no arguements!

I have personally seen trainee instructors who claim to be able to rescue open boat paddlers from a Playboat get it horribly wrong on a cold, wet and windy day - result - two paddlers in the water a lot longer than they should be and a trainee who failed their CST!

Reduce the odds of failing by using a real boat for teaching and save the play boat for pleasure paddling.

Just an opinion you understand!
Interesting. I would consider myself to be (at the very least) a 'semi-decent' coach and haven't used a hulking great river boat for such purposes since about 1996. Creek boats are cumbersome, high-decked and unless properly outfitted could present serious control issues due to smaller coaches wallowing around inside them. They belong (surprise surprise) on creeks.

In a commercial environment uniformity (which indicates consistency) can be an issue but suggesting that coaches should be in a specific type of kayak per-say is nonsensical. I've known a lot of coaches that would struggle hauling a swamped boat all the way up onto the deck of a creek boat (a fairly serious manual handling risk which you as a manager cannot afford to be unaware of) just as others may struggle with the relative lack of bouyancy in a playboat. At the last centre in which I worked, we were all expected to paddle the supplied pyranha playboats on session, boats which we spent long hours training in in order to ensure that we were entirely proficient in our rescues etc.

The chief valid arguement for boat choice (certainly where beginner coaching is concerned) has already been mentioned, i.e. the old 'you can only do that 'cos you're in a flash boat' situation.

As for what your assessors will think, that really does vary quite a lot. I've known level five coaches with thirty years experience conduct level 3 assessments in Prozones and old SI numpties tell me that my old Prijon Rockit circa 1996 was too small for coaching.

P.S: Any centre that has coaches in kayaks in charge of groups in open boats is asking for trouble and should seriously re-appraise the quality of its output. Imagine: "Right, can I ask the three of you to hold onto my boat while I wrestle with this..." or even better "Try to imagine that I'm in a canoe, kneeling up with a paddle that has only one blade..."
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