why are my pics all fuzzy?

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woody
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why are my pics all fuzzy?

Post by woody » Mon Nov 27, 2006 9:00 pm

Okey dokey, so Ive got the new camera, and Ive got the advice on which webshare to post my pics on, but wgat I really need to know before I can share my awesome boating with you all is.....

How do you get the damn thing to stay dry on the lens? Lots of my pics are fuzzy or not quite focussed due to this (I think). Is it as simple as carrying a small cloth in a dry bag? Someone also mentioned something to rub on the lens but I cant remember what. Is it just camera shake?

Camera is Pentax Optio W10 used in sport mode.
Here is an example of a good pic:


Image



Here are two not so good ones:



Image

Image


Thanks for help in advance.
Woody

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honeydog
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Post by honeydog » Mon Nov 27, 2006 9:03 pm

Have you got it on Auto focus, This will focus on the closest object only and blur the rest ?

I had that problem with my Sony P200, but got it sortes now because I read the manual.

DannyT
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Post by DannyT » Mon Nov 27, 2006 9:04 pm

Are all taken from the same camera by the same person?

The bottom 2 look (to me) like they are zoomed a fair bit?

YvonneB
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not much help

Post by YvonneB » Mon Nov 27, 2006 9:07 pm

This isnt a lot of help Im afraid but my Optio seems to mist up from inside in cold temperatures. Are you sure it is water on the lens or condensation on the inside? I think this is a fault that other people have reported on here.

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woody
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Post by woody » Mon Nov 27, 2006 9:11 pm

Yep they are all taken by me on the same camera, bottom two are zoomed but optically only, not digital. Could it be that the autofocus is struggling with the distance? The bottom one was taken from an eddy and I was bouncing a bit. The middle one was from the bank and the top one was from the boat but was quite close so I think the combination of flash and fast shutter has grabbed my mate quite well (smile craig).

I had not thought of the camera misting up inside but this is quite possible. Anybody else come across this or any other ideas?

woody

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Ricks-Freestyle-Mind
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Post by Ricks-Freestyle-Mind » Mon Nov 27, 2006 9:11 pm

DannyT wrote:The bottom 2 look (to me) like they are zoomed a fair bit?
I wouldn't say that they are pixelated. They look more blurry.

It could be something to do with the following:

Shutter speed?

Focusing?

If it is already on auto-focus, then are you giving it enough time to let itself focus before pressing it straight down?

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honeydog
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Post by honeydog » Mon Nov 27, 2006 9:15 pm

Ricks-Freestyle-Mind wrote:
DannyT wrote:The bottom 2 look (to me) like they are zoomed a fair bit?
I wouldn't say that they are pixelated. They look more blurry.

It could be something to do with the following:

Shutter speed?

Focusing?

If it is already on auto-focus, then are you giving it enough time to let itself focus before pressing it straight down?
This could be the spot on answer try holding the "click" button down half way to allow focus then snap, that night work

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woody
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Post by woody » Mon Nov 27, 2006 9:19 pm

Rick I set it onto sport mode. I.e. designed to capture fast moving subjects with a high iso and fast shutter. Ive decided that a large proportion of the blurring in the bottom photo is camera shake but that doesnt explain the overall mistiness of the shot which was not present in reality at the site. I think that my camera was misting up as Bonnie said on the inside.

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honeydog
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Post by honeydog » Mon Nov 27, 2006 9:22 pm

Try on normal mode i find when i set my DSC P200 to sports mode it doesnt work well because kayakers dont got fast enough. It works well with cars/motorbikes etc at 50mph or above for my camera anyway

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Mark R
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Re: why are my pics all fuzzy?

Post by Mark R » Mon Nov 27, 2006 9:26 pm

woody wrote:How do you get the damn thing to stay dry on the lens?
You won't like my answer, but here it is...

Carry it in a dry bag or case. Nothing else will do, if you are serious about decent photos.


But, you ask, if that's the only solution...then what was the point of me buying a waterproof camera?

The answer...none really, except for those few moments when you can only get the shot on the water...e.g. in a gorge or at sea.
Mark Rainsley
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buck197
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Post by buck197 » Mon Nov 27, 2006 9:35 pm

I take a small strip of chamois leather with me which i ring out to "dry" the lense, it works most of the time.
Brian Taylor
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Wilf
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Post by Wilf » Mon Nov 27, 2006 9:38 pm

I reckon its condensation Woody. You carry this in your chest pocket, and then pull it out in the cold. Try dunking it before you shoot next time.

I used to have the same problem with my old Canon A1 underwater camera. Also Try taking the auto ISO rating off, and setting it to 200 or 400 ASA, this will help.

You are right to choose a sport mode, thou in fairness on an average day 125ths of a second at f5.6 will freeze most moderate action, and you should get that with ISO100.

Having said all of this, Pre-focusing is still essential, like several others have said, half depress the button, wait for the green light and then take the picture.

Wilf
Last edited by Wilf on Mon Nov 27, 2006 9:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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ol
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Post by ol » Mon Nov 27, 2006 9:42 pm

I usually give mine a quick dunk and shake, thats, dunk and shake, in the water. This sometimes will clear the lens for a good shot. trying to wipe away the drops with a finger ends in a futile game of chase. Use a cloth, perhaps a bit of chamois tied to the strap will work.

Definately half-depress the shutter until the camera finds its focus, then fully depress the button.

To take a shot of a paddler who is not there yet but will be coming into shot, I often focus on an object which will be a similar distance by half-depressing the shutter, then hold it in halfway, then snap the paddler when your shot is there.

You probably don't need a 'sport' mode for paddlers. Try following the moving object/person and snap your picture. Don't stop when you snap, but follow through.

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Post by markyparky » Mon Nov 27, 2006 9:45 pm

Hi Woody i would say that the first photo has got solar flare caused by water on the lens which can be prevented by using rain away, which bikers use on their helmet visors. The second and third photos i believe just aren't in focus. condensation or steaming up of the lens normally happens when you bring your camera in from the cold to a warm place the glass mists up. But i don't think that this is the case here i think they just aren't focussed try pressing the shutter half way down like other people have sudgested. Hope this helps just my opinion i may be wrong regards Mark.
it's better to forget and be happy than to remember and be sad.

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woody
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Post by woody » Mon Nov 27, 2006 9:46 pm

Sport mode for me is just a quick way to sort out appropriate iso and shutter with fill in flash. Seems to work quite well. I will give all these ideas a try, look back next weekend for the results!

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Post by Matt R » Mon Nov 27, 2006 10:06 pm

You can use 'Rainwaway' as suggested above. Other options are to go for the ideas people use for diving masks - if you spit on the lens and rub it all over, then give it good splash / dunk with water and shake the excess off, this will keep it clear - usually for long enough to get pics of a group running a drop (depends a bit on conditions obviously.) Washing up liquid can also be used in the same way but should last longer (I know people who use this to stop glasses misting up for paddling with). I have also heard of people using toothpaste too, but it is slightly abrasive and in my opinion it will probably damage the coating on the lens.

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Post by Agent Nomad » Mon Nov 27, 2006 10:37 pm

The first

The center soft focus area is the sunlight reflecting on the appiture diapghram [you also see this on the BBC from time to time]
The soft focus spot to the right is water bead on the lens magnifing the light in that area and overexposing the picture

The second

Is camera shake as nothing is in focus or a misted up lens

The thrid

Is camera shake as nothing is in focus, less likely to be misted up lens this time


Cure for the first one as other have said dry lens and look where the sun is

Second and third increase shuter speed [you may need to up the ISO settings of film speed]

Have a look http://homepage.ntlworld.com/paul.jones37/gallery.htmhere for some photos I have taken and here but not taken by me http://homepage.ntlworld.com/paul.jones ... 202003.htm

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woody
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Post by woody » Tue Nov 28, 2006 8:29 am

Hey all thanks for the feedback.

Just to be clear Im happy with the flare etc in the first shot, its the mistiness of the other two that is annoying. I will definitely attempt to aquire some rainaway from a bike shop, and I already rub saliva on the lens. Havent tried washing up liquid, and I dont think toothpaste is going to go on the list.

Paul Im starting to agree that its camera shake. Ill take some more next weekend and experiment with settings, light, etc.

Cheers
Woody

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Post by andyw » Tue Nov 28, 2006 8:51 am

I'd say all the problems above are caused by water on the lens - which is possibly also having an effect on the autofocus to exacerbate the problem. You could try making a little strip of the super-absorbent synthetic drying-up cloths from any supermarket - no problem with the cloth getting soaked as you can squeeze it dry and dab off the water.

(I've made a note-to-self to remember to buy some - have had to cope without for a while as I keep forgetting!)

Andy

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flydave
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blurry

Post by flydave » Tue Nov 28, 2006 9:07 am

I've used the optio W10 for a bit now (had a WP before but lost it) and got good results so a couple of points:

Nothing in the camera's literature states that the sport mode actually selects the fastest possible shutter speed! Daft I know, but I've had a play around with it, switching modes whilst looking at the same scene, and sport mode doesnt seem to select a higher shutter speed/faster iso. As far as I can tell sport mode just has a 'fancy' focusing algorithm that tracks a moving subject. Hence I just use the basic program mode.

I almost always use the shake and dunk technique to ensure the lens is free of droplets/condensation. But a bit of chamois might be a good investment.

If you're photo'ing from the boat try and select a stable platform eg hold onto a rock or something.

Most important - Pre-focus. Decide where the focus point for your award winning picture is going to be. Half press the shutter and make sure the small focus square has locked onto the right place. Dont release the button! Wait for the canoeist to get in place and snap the picture. Takes a bit of practise but it's the only way to guarantee what you want in focus is in focus.

Manually set the ISO speed. From what I've seen in reviews 400 asa is acceptable on the W10. 800 is noticeably worse. But if lighting conditions are good then use 200 asa at least.

Hope this helps. Happy snapping

Dave

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Post by GeoBoater » Tue Nov 28, 2006 9:44 am

I've had the Optio for a while now and have never gotten good pictures out of the sport mode, but have seen plenty of white spots in my photos in all modes. The landscape mode actually works far better and takes faster pictures, I think because it sets the focal length to infinity and doesn't require the pre-focus.

Ryan

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Post by NPearce » Tue Nov 28, 2006 11:51 am

I find that condensation appears over the lens when taking it from my pocket, usually creating images like the bottom 2. I would say that the white spots are almost certainly water droplets. Wipe with a finger and old the tip of your finger right at the bottom of the lens to 'draw' the water off the main area. seems to work.

Sport mode can create good pics, but I have found that because I myself am not usually still to take the photo the camera will rapidly change its point of focus over the background rather than the subject.

Capture your subject first, and as the focus starts to change its like a game to keep the focus on the paddler and not the rock / water / background. After all this concentration you find that the pics are not what you were after and are a bit naff.

I usually use the standard picture mode, and then clean and crop in photoshop. Not starting an argument about the finer points of photography I usually work to the rule that I will get 1 good shot for every 10 I take with an 'on the water' camera.

Nathan

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Misty glass

Post by philm » Thu Dec 14, 2006 8:43 pm

Solution for the "fogged-up lens" problem, at least if you are using a waterproof housing around a "normal" camera:

1. Load the camera into the housing at home, in a nice DRY environment (air-conditioned is best...) to minimise the amount of moisture which enters the housing. If you seal up the housing inside a car full of damp gear, or on the riverbank in the rain, then you're not going to win any photo competitions once the air inside the housing cools down and the mist forms.

2. Always slip a sachet of silicone gel inside the housing. Dive-shops (and Amazon, I just found out) sell "moisture-munchers" expressly for this purpose... although I just use one of the little packs of silicone which come inside every electronic or optical toy I buy. For "waterproof" cameras without a housing, it may be possible to slip a small silica gel pack inside the battery compartment to absorb any moisture which gets "inside" the camera.

Result... fog-free photos even at depth in cold water...

Happy shooting...
philm

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