Are you better at kayaking if you do other adventure sports?

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jmmoxon
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Re: Are you better at kayaking if you do other adventure sports?

Post by jmmoxon » Mon Feb 19, 2018 8:32 pm

Nature versus nurture (nobody knows)

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Re: Are you better at kayaking if you do other adventure sports?

Post by gp.girl » Mon Feb 19, 2018 9:40 pm

morsey wrote:
Mon Feb 19, 2018 7:40 pm
gp.girl wrote:
Wed Feb 14, 2018 9:37 pm
just dangerous to me.
That's probably due to Massive Attack dropping bombs on the Doors. Now if you add gorillaz and bluebell woods, paints a whole different level of soft and fluffy.


Or I guess the difference between looking at grade four comparisons versus class two?
That is not soft and fluffy! It looks hard with knobbly bits and the slopes are way too steep for me. Done going over the handlebars of a bike - it hurts and I didn't do anything serious. I did spot a couple of nice grade 0 bits :)

If you watch me bank scrambling you'll spot a couple of things - I'm slow, careful and will always tend to go up the bank as I don't like going down. I sometimes just sit down to get down a bit. Hate taking a paddle and throwline as it limits my ability to use my hands.
I can roll :)

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Re: Are you better at kayaking if you do other adventure sports?

Post by Jim » Mon Feb 19, 2018 9:44 pm

jmmoxon wrote:
Mon Feb 19, 2018 8:32 pm
Nature versus nurture (nobody knows)

Mike
Completely agree!

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Re: Are you better at kayaking if you do other adventure sports?

Post by Jim » Mon Feb 19, 2018 10:00 pm

gp.girl wrote:
Mon Feb 19, 2018 9:40 pm
If you watch me bank scrambling you'll spot a couple of things - I'm slow, careful and will always tend to go up the bank as I don't like going down. I sometimes just sit down to get down a bit. Hate taking a paddle and throwline as it limits my ability to use my hands.
Some slight re-adjustments needed then:
- reason my throwlines have carbiners on is so I can clip them to my BA to keep my hands free whilst scouting, the crab stays on my BA when I get the bag ready to throw.
- paddle can be used (carefully) like a walking stick to enhance balance when scrambling over rocky/uneven ground, especially when going down. You can reach down with the paddle and then use it for balance as you move your feet down.

There is nothing wrong with sitting down to work your way down a steep or tricky section, if you are sitting down you can't fall down.
If you ever travel in a remote area with people who are used to that kind of thing, you will generally find they take far fewer basic risks like rushing over steep ground than most brits do - we are too used to rescue only ever being hours away, in the wilderness a broken ankle could take days or weeks to get help for, by which time you might have perished...

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Re: Are you better at kayaking if you do other adventure sports?

Post by gp.girl » Wed Mar 07, 2018 11:36 pm

Jim wrote:
Mon Feb 19, 2018 11:40 am
I have been quietly watching this thread and thinking about something Amber Maslen blogged recently which I struggled to 100% agree with, but I think there is probably a lot in it, and has some relevance

Amber's blog was about talent as an outdated or misguided concept.

However whatever opportunities you have had to date, ANYONE can improve if they really want to, and are able to make time to do it.

One thing I would add to that, if you have so many fears/ confidence issues across a range of sports perhaps it would be best to really focus on one for a while, overcome those little problems in one sport, get some obvious improvement under your belt, and then revisit the others and see if your new found confidence starts to make it easier to progress in them. As a paddler I 'should' hope that you choose to concentrate on your kayaking, but have a good think about it, and if there is something else that you feel you could master more quickly then choose that for now.
3 fears I don't like (haven't tested if I'd actually still panic for a lot of years) heights, pain and failure. The first 2 are not going to be changed the 3rd depends on my head game at the time and gets worse as whats fine and almost expected at first gets more embarrassing the longer you fail to improve. So falling over and bailing was fine in year 1 ok ish in year 2 getting silly in year 3 and difficult to explain in year 6 as by then almost everyone can roll probably for the last few years.

In one way i agree but in reality it doesn't work that way. So if you look at anything I've spent any significant time at I've never managed more than ok. Something like the Olympic course looked scary the first time i saw it, now looks less scary but still no more paddleable than when I first looked at it. So that says i've reached the top of my 'talent'. The skills needed don't come naturally to me and as shown with the rolling they don't really come to hard work either. So currently although i can roll ok in a pool set up etc at the moment I don't even know if I can do a planned t-rescue outside. Certainly if I capsize unexpectedly i'll bail, once the kayak is upside down if I'm slow! It's a good reason why in 5+ years i've probably spent 30 minutes at most playing in waves or pourovers as I've never got past the falling over and swimming stage. Now that one hasn't been tested for the talent versus practice theory as I've avoided it almost entirely, on the other hand you don't learn a lot from falling over in seconds and swimming so it didn't and still doesn't seem like a good thing to try. To a lesser extent this applies to everything as getting it wrong has higher consequenses so there's always an extra element of caution/fear for anything.
I can roll :)

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Re: Are you better at kayaking if you do other adventure sports?

Post by DaveBland » Thu Mar 08, 2018 12:48 am

It's true of most sports, but with ww paddling in particular... it's about 70% head games and the rest is a mix of fitness, strength and physical aptitude.

You can work on all the technique and physical suff in the World, but if your head ain't there, you are onto closer before you start.
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Re: Are you better at kayaking if you do other adventure sports?

Post by SimonMW » Thu Mar 08, 2018 5:38 pm

You can work on all the technique and physical suff in the World, but if your head ain't there, you are onto closer before you start.
Indeed. So odd how it works, too. I don't mind low volume technical, but big volume scares me. My partner whoops down big/huge volume, but she struggles to do something like a low middle Tawe, all because of head game!

But, familiarity helps. So the more you are in a situation (as long as you can get over enough of the head game to keep putting yourself there), the more comfortable you will be. But of course the hard part of this is that it needs to be varied. Ie I used to be scared of holes, so I did a lot of work on the artificial courses and became familiar with some of them. But take me to a feature I don't know, and even now I go tense until I've spent a while there.

Experience and hark backs can be a real crapper too. So for instance I'm quite happy to go down all sorts of rivers, and have done all sorts from big to small, and despite me (hopefully!) being a far, far better kayaker than I was when I was a beginner, I still have a hang up and get nervous about places like Fingers on the Tryweryn, simply because of experiences when I was starting out. Despite not having swum there since I was, well, a beginner!

There is one 'big name' paddler, who's name I won't mention, who told me that in fact he still got really nervous on big waves. This is a guy who is used to doing waves like The Ruins etc. He told me that he's usually fine as long as there's a big flat area behind the wave. That really surprised me given the kinds of places and rivers he'd paddled. So I guess self doubt is something that doesn't just go away because you are well known or at the top of the field.

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