Moments that click.

Inland paddling
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SimonMW
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Moments that click.

Post by SimonMW » Thu Jul 28, 2016 1:25 pm

These survey threads are getting popular, so here's mine. Yes, it is similar to the "best bit of advice" thread, but not.

When trying something new, or for kayaking in general, what was the one self realised thing (not advice from others) that clicked in your mind that made a previously difficult or impossible move (whether freestyle or just down river general paddling) possible?

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TechnoEngineer
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Re: Moments that click.

Post by TechnoEngineer » Thu Jul 28, 2016 2:00 pm

In terms of the principle of auto-edging by "looking where you're going with the shoulder line" when paddling forwards to cross an eddy-line, "looking where you're coming from with the shoulder line" when paddling backwards to cross an eddy-line. Similarly - keeping the shoulder line looking upstream to stay on the wave at Hurley was another "aha" moment when I kept on being propelled off the wave at 90 degrees with "square shoulders".

Another one was when coaching beginners, they often hold the paddleshaft close to their chest, meaning they were applying a lot of turning force because the paddles were going too far back, when all else looked OK. Holding the paddleshaft away from the body meant their forward strokes were nearer the front of the boat and thus easier to keep going straight.
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MikeVeal
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Re: Moments that click.

Post by MikeVeal » Thu Jul 28, 2016 3:32 pm

TechnoEngineer wrote:Another one was when coaching beginners, they often hold the paddleshaft close to their chest, meaning they were applying a lot of turning force because the paddles were going too far back, when all else looked OK. Holding the paddleshaft away from the body meant their forward strokes were nearer the front of the boat and thus easier to keep going straight.
Or leaning back. Does the same thing, moves the point about which the boat turns rearward too, creating a long bow and a short stern - a directionally unstable design. Took me a long while to work out how to explain this to the newbies.


To answer Simon's question directly - I learnt to hand roll through mental rehearsal. Back in the days when I didn't paddle during the winter months I mentally rehearsed the roll regularly before dozing off. I went from not being able to hand roll at the end of one season to coming up every time at the start of the next. No gradual improvement, just "click" and it worked.

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DaveBland
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Re: Moments that click.

Post by DaveBland » Thu Jul 28, 2016 4:03 pm

My click was more mental. Going from expecting that I should run everything on a run and having all of the associated stresses and anxieties – to a deciding how I feel when I get there approach.

One particular river in mind has a big waterfall half way down, that I normally run. So for the first half of the river, all I am thinking of is running the waterfall, whack kinda spoils the other great stuff above that I'm not focusing on. By starting the river with a 'I'm not bothered if I run the fall of not' attitude, suddenly the pressure I'm putting on myself is gone and I get on with enjoying the top half of the run.
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sundaykayaker
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Re: Moments that click.

Post by sundaykayaker » Thu Jul 28, 2016 10:35 pm

Breathing. Through a drop.
If I don't breath. I tense up. Teath are clenched. Paddle comes out of the water. Waiting to be hit by the water. Usually resulting in a swim.
If I Breathe. And yes I have to say that out loud to remind my self.
The inhale and exhale link up with forward paddling. There is less stiffness in the body. And chances of running a drop successful, increase.

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