software for editing gopro footage

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richp
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software for editing gopro footage

Post by richp » Wed Dec 02, 2015 7:23 am

can anybody recommend software for editing gopro footage?
I am a bit of a numpty when it comes to modern technology so the more user friendly, the better.
I particularly want to crop and 'blow up' snapshots but keep the sharpness. At the moment i use 'media player', but cropping and blowing up makes the shot pixelated.

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Strad
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Re: software for editing gopro footage

Post by Strad » Wed Dec 02, 2015 10:01 am

I like Adobe Premier there is an 'elements' (cheap) version or the full pro version which costs half a kayak or so...
Old School?? I miss my AQII..
Graham Stradling

SimonMW
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Re: software for editing gopro footage

Post by SimonMW » Wed Dec 02, 2015 2:51 pm

At the moment I use 'media player', but cropping and blowing up makes the shot pixelated.
You can't add information that isn't there. If you zoom in or crop a digital picture beyond a certain point no amount of good software will stop it from becoming pixellated.

alandelph
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Re: software for editing gopro footage

Post by alandelph » Wed Dec 02, 2015 3:01 pm

Corel Video Studio is another good editing software and you can get a trial version to try out

ALAN

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Jim
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Re: software for editing gopro footage

Post by Jim » Wed Dec 02, 2015 4:18 pm

SimonMW wrote:
At the moment I use 'media player', but cropping and blowing up makes the shot pixelated.
You can't add information that isn't there. If you zoom in or crop a digital picture beyond a certain point no amount of good software will stop it from becoming pixellated.
True, but the OP may not understand what kind of data he is working with in the first place.

The mp4 files that the camera shoots are compressed files, if you edit them directly you will quickly get pixellation that you might not get at the same 'zoom' level if you were working with uncompressed footage. If you use the GoPro software, the second step (after selecting files) is to 'convert' them, which is actually decompressing them so you can work with the full data set and not lose detail through trying to edit the compressed version.
You don't need to use the GoPro software for any or all of the process but since it has the same codec that the camera uses it may at least be worth using it to 'convert' the files (to avi) even if you want to use another program to go through the avi and grab the snapshot you want and manipulate it.

Compressing images/videos is basically using some complex maths to describe where areas the same colour are instead of recording the actual colour of each pixel (which takes up more disk space). A Codec (coder/decoder) is the bit of complex maths that is used, and each manufacturer has their own similar but often unique bit of complex maths so using the same codec to uncompress as was used to compress can be an advantage. Working with compressed data you don't actually get to change the colour of an individual pixel, because the pixel data on file is wrapped up in some maths that tells the software about other pixels at the same time, hence you may be getting pixellation that you might not get when working uncompressed, but as Simon says, at some level of zoom pixellation will be unavoidable. Also compressing already compressed files may increase pixellation (may also make them bigger!).

You may still find your video snapshots are inferior to stills taken with the same camera - there may be differences in the way moving image data is recorded.

Apologies if you are already working with uncompressed files in windows media player, it is an area a lot of people don't understand so I thought it worth mentioning :)

Teaman
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Re: software for editing gopro footage

Post by Teaman » Wed Dec 02, 2015 4:39 pm

http://shop.gopro.com/EMEA/softwareanda ... l#/start=1
you could try that?
I use it.
Mind you I tend to crop clips on quicktime first (mainly for sections that have altered speeds, you need to keep a little note of the time whilst cropping to avoid overlap and that matrix style deja vou although once you get used to the gp studio its pretty good.

PolecatApollo
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Re: software for editing gopro footage

Post by PolecatApollo » Wed Dec 02, 2015 7:13 pm

I like Premiere Pro.

If you want to be able to crop your image a bit more and keep it looking good, try filming in a higher resolution. Gopro hero 3+ black does 2.7k at 30fps and I think the hero 4+ black does 4k at 30fps. You can get away with cropping these more.

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Re: software for editing gopro footage

Post by paddletastic2 » Wed Dec 02, 2015 9:49 pm

Why not use gopro's own, free editing software?

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Re: software for editing gopro footage

Post by SimonMW » Thu Dec 03, 2015 10:13 am

The mp4 files that the camera shoots are compressed files, if you edit them directly you will quickly get pixellation that you might not get at the same 'zoom' level if you were working with uncompressed footage. If you use the GoPro software, the second step (after selecting files) is to 'convert' them, which is actually decompressing them so you can work with the full data set and not lose detail through trying to edit the compressed version.
It doesn't really work that way alas (I am a video producer by trade, so I deal with this stuff on a daily basis). Once the video has been recorded in a compressed format such as H264 MP4, converting it to a less compressed format such as Cineform or Prores through the GoPro software doesn't magically give you more picture data to work with (other than larger file sizes). The picture will look exactly the same as it was in the original recording, but the file size will be bigger and the new file will use an intra frame format rather than the inter frame that H264 utilises. So any new recompressions may be handled better during editing, and your NLE software may be able to handle the files more efficiently than H264, but it won't make the picture quality any better than the original.

But you won't get any more picture data. Any compression artifacts that were in the original recording, all the colour banding, noise issues, resolution etc will all remain the same as the original file. The only way to improve this would be to hook up a Prores or DnXHD recorder to the HDMI connection of the GoPro to record a much better signal in the first place.
Also compressing already compressed files may increase pixellation (may also make them bigger!).
This is true, although it isn't so much pixillation that occurs, but increased levels of macro blocking.

If zooming in on a video frame is needed, then you might get some mileage out of using a 4K capable camera such as the Hero4 Black Edition and editing on a 1080p timeline. This will give you the freedom to zoom into the picture a fair way before big problems occur.

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Re: software for editing gopro footage

Post by Jim » Thu Dec 03, 2015 11:14 am

SimonMW wrote:
The mp4 files that the camera shoots are compressed files, if you edit them directly you will quickly get pixellation that you might not get at the same 'zoom' level if you were working with uncompressed footage. If you use the GoPro software, the second step (after selecting files) is to 'convert' them, which is actually decompressing them so you can work with the full data set and not lose detail through trying to edit the compressed version.
It doesn't really work that way alas (I am a video producer by trade, so I deal with this stuff on a daily basis). Once the video has been recorded in a compressed format such as H264 MP4, converting it to a less compressed format such as Cineform or Prores through the GoPro software doesn't magically give you more picture data to work with (other than larger file sizes). The picture will look exactly the same as it was in the original recording, but the file size will be bigger and the new file will use an intra frame format rather than the inter frame that H264 utilises. So any new recompressions may be handled better during editing, and your NLE software may be able to handle the files more efficiently than H264, but it won't make the picture quality any better than the original.

But you won't get any more picture data. Any compression artifacts that were in the original recording, all the colour banding, noise issues, resolution etc will all remain the same as the original file. The only way to improve this would be to hook up a Prores or DnXHD recorder to the HDMI connection of the GoPro to record a much better signal in the first place.
Also compressing already compressed files may increase pixellation (may also make them bigger!).
This is true, although it isn't so much pixillation that occurs, but increased levels of macro blocking.

If zooming in on a video frame is needed, then you might get some mileage out of using a 4K capable camera such as the Hero4 Black Edition and editing on a 1080p timeline. This will give you the freedom to zoom into the picture a fair way before big problems occur.
Yep, I was not thinking you would gain data that isn't in the file (I may have worded it badly) just that you can edit it directly without the compression getting in the way and causing you to double compress when finished which will always take more data away.
You might call it macro blocking, joe public calls it pixellation, we don't know the technical terms - if the image looks coarser when we are finished, it's pixellated - whatever pixellation specifically means :)

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