Dealing with loss of ability and drive

Inland paddling
User avatar
Lancs_lad
Posts: 1417
Joined: Fri Apr 21, 2006 8:41 pm
Location: Lancaster

Dealing with loss of ability and drive

Post by Lancs_lad » Mon Jul 28, 2014 1:00 pm

Some of you may be aware that I broke my ankle in Chile back in January. Since then I have been in a boat on flat water a handful of times. Each time I struggle to walk the next day. I am still in the healing process but out of cast and walking of sorts.

I have seen my friends go off on their European adventures this summer, and weirdly not been that bothered about it. I have also watched a few of this summers vids on here and felt like I have been left behind in the skills area, as in things have moved on rapidly in 6 months (they probably haven't tho).

Half of me as above has lost all drive to want to paddle WW again and the other half wants to paddle WW but realises I will probably never get back to the level I was before. This is partly due to the ankle, partly due to potential children and partly due to confidence.

So how did the chargers of yesteryears deal with not being able to get out as much, as a result dropping down a level etc? I am a person who gets enjoyment out of pushing myself to my max, if I cant do this in a kayak I fear I may throw in the towel.

Wadhamite
Posts: 356
Joined: Wed Jul 18, 2012 10:08 am
Contact:

Re: Dealing with loss of ability and drive

Post by Wadhamite » Mon Jul 28, 2014 1:20 pm

There's no shame in changing sport (perhaps to something that won't bother your ankle), but before you give up on paddling, make sure you've had given *really* good physiotherapy a chance (which may not be what the NHS is able to offer...). A good physio, who has successfully treated your kind of injury before, may be able to get you back to 100%.

And six months, as far as I know, isn't that much time for an ankle break to recover - it took me a year and a bit to put just a dislocated shoulder right. Perhaps too soon to give up hope?
LV induction guide: http://tmblr.co/ZIurAvTdASgQ

Mark Dixon
Posts: 820
Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2012 6:22 am
Location: Devon
Has thanked: 1 time

Re: Dealing with loss of ability and drive

Post by Mark Dixon » Mon Jul 28, 2014 1:48 pm

I know a few people giving up their sport because of children, you say "potential" children, does this mean they have yet to come? Children grow up quickly and you have to adapt around them, before you know it they will be paddling with you (I'm canoeing my my 4 yr old grandaughter regularly already)
As for confidence, how old are you? There is a point in your 40's everyone starts to lose their bottle, no more fairground rides etc, best way to counteract it is to paddle with people better than yourself,you'll soon find that confidence back. Paddling lesser water is no big deal and a great place to regain those skills.
Injuries are a pain and the older you are the longer they take to heal, but they will heal eventually so persevere.
Mark

User avatar
Niall Milner
Posts: 302
Joined: Fri May 09, 2003 9:22 pm
Location: Biggar

Re: Dealing with loss of ability and drive

Post by Niall Milner » Mon Jul 28, 2014 2:02 pm

Do you paddle for 'GoPro Glory', or because it makes you smile?

You don't have to be pushing the very edges of your ability every single time you sit in a boat to be enjoying yourself.

Anyway, kids will only make Grd2/3 a whole load more fun if you get a 16' Canoe for the family! (and they aren't the death knell for 'decent' paddling either).

Niall

User avatar
Jim
Posts: 13917
Joined: Sun Apr 21, 2002 2:14 pm
Location: Dumbarton
Has thanked: 7 times
Been thanked: 47 times

Re: Dealing with loss of ability and drive

Post by Jim » Mon Jul 28, 2014 2:14 pm

It's like riding a bike, I keep falling off.
No, I never forget how!

It feels like a long time and a lot of ground lost but you would be surprized how quickly you can get back up to a reasonable level once you are fit to really get back to it.

You accused me recently of being way out of date, you were kind of right in that I have vastly reduced my WW paddling due to all sorts of other commitments, there were a couple of years there where I maybe jumped in a kayak on WW once in a year (for a long weekend). Yeah the first few rapids I was a bit nervous and then I settled back into things. The guys I paddle with on the particular trip I was keeping up with always like to try and do a new river each year, well, they had done most of what I know so the result was that even I was paddling a new river (or 2) before the end of the trip, which is something I probably wouldn't do if I wasn't back in the zone - sometimes it might take me a river to get back in, other times just a rapid or 2.

I have upped my paddling again now, although mainly in canoe so still very little time in a kayak on WW. Just after Easter a couple of us looked at the Coe at a good medium/high level, one of my favourites but I probably hadn't been on it for 4 or 5 years. My canoe skills aren't necessarily up to completing Clachaig gorge upright yet, and Paddy had never run it before so we didn't have much rescue capacity between us. Paddy was in his L'edge so I grabbed my Burn (battered old Mk1 that used to be Neil's and I have hardly paddled at all, certainly not since the previous October) to prevent myself being a liability and make myself a potential rescuer. Jumped on the river, great level, near Paddy's limit (but he stayed in his boat so obviously on the right side of it) but even in a pretty alien boat on a river I hadn't run for ages at a pushy level, I was completely at home and able to enjoy the run (and at least I remembered my spraydeck - the only drawback of switching between canoe and kayak!).

Seriously don't worry about not being good enough when you get fit, as long as your mates are sound and will run a couple of easier rivers whilst you get your mojo back (or you can join some club paddles) I should think you will be back up to speed and get the hunger back fairly quickly.

Alternatively if you are looking at the ankle problem and thinking getting back in kayaks again is going to be a problem, try an OC1 :) Seriously my knees get a bit tired after a while but I have room to wriggle out of the straps and move so they never get too bad, my ankles though have no problems at all, especially compared to paddling playboats (don't try a C1 though, they are real ankle killers!). There are guys doing pretty much everything kayakers can do in them now, but at the entry level you will certainly find you can get more challenge and enjoyment out of easier water for a while but still have the option to push it as hard as you want.

User avatar
Lancs_lad
Posts: 1417
Joined: Fri Apr 21, 2006 8:41 pm
Location: Lancaster

Re: Dealing with loss of ability and drive

Post by Lancs_lad » Mon Jul 28, 2014 3:02 pm

Thanks for the replies.

Some quick answers.

I am 34 and the potential child will hopefully be here within 18 months. I am smashing the physio exercises and have booked an appointment with a non NHS physio for next week. I know the healing time is a year plus and I have to be patient.

As for why I paddle. I will admit that I do love a bit of "GoPro hero boating" but I am happy with less on the limit boating as long as I know I can go to the limit (my limit not Bomb Flow's limit) when I want to (if that makes sense?).

sundaykayaker
Posts: 130
Joined: Thu Jun 13, 2013 7:42 pm

Re: Dealing with loss of ability and drive

Post by sundaykayaker » Mon Jul 28, 2014 3:34 pm

From what I have seen of your posts. U r a hard core paddler.
I am at the other end of the scale. Iam a shit paddler. And get a little bit less shit each time I go out. - 55yrs old. Started paddling for the kids. They didn't want to paddle and I carried on.
I share ur fear. If I stop paddling even for a few weeks. Will I want to get out of bed on a Sunday. Will the call of a layin stop me from getting out. So.. that's my story. The biggest thing that chages paddling habits is not the injury or the mind games that causes. Its the KIDS.
They should carry a health warning. Kids are for life not just fir Christmas :)

User avatar
Lancs_lad
Posts: 1417
Joined: Fri Apr 21, 2006 8:41 pm
Location: Lancaster

Re: Dealing with loss of ability and drive

Post by Lancs_lad » Mon Jul 28, 2014 3:52 pm

sundaykayaker wrote:From what I have seen of your posts. U r a hard core paddler.
I am at the other end of the scale. Iam a shit paddler. And get a little bit less shit each time I go out. - 55yrs old. Started paddling for the kids. They didn't want to paddle and I carried on.
I share ur fear. If I stop paddling even for a few weeks. Will I want to get out of bed on a Sunday. Will the call of a layin stop me from getting out. So.. that's my story. The biggest thing that chages paddling habits is not the injury or the mind games that causes. Its the KIDS.
They should carry a health warning. Kids are for life not just fir Christmas :)
I wouldn't call myself "hardcore" but grade 3 for the rest of my life isn't going to do it for me (unless I happen to move next to the Sjoa Playrun).

Anyway, as mentioned by some previous replies I am probably being very premature with my doom and gloom. On the positive side I am hitting up some WW for the first time since the injury at Tees barrage this weekend and I have ordered a new MTB.

tenboats1
Posts: 470
Joined: Wed Sep 07, 2005 11:59 am
Location: scotland
Been thanked: 2 times

Re: Dealing with loss of ability and drive

Post by tenboats1 » Mon Jul 28, 2014 4:37 pm

You could try open boating: mere Gd4's in open canoe is a real challenge and a whole new set of skills. The same, but different, if you see what I mean. Might add some spark and drive back into the mix for you.

User avatar
buck197
Posts: 1439
Joined: Sun Oct 16, 2005 5:25 pm
Location: Plymouth
Been thanked: 1 time

Re: Dealing with loss of ability and drive

Post by buck197 » Mon Jul 28, 2014 4:40 pm

Most outdoor enthusiasts enjoy a number of sports walking, climbing, kayaking, caving, SUP, surfing,MTB, cycling, windsurfing etc. Maybe you were at the top end of where you wanted to be or near the top when you had your injury, now you need a new challenge and well kids will certainly be one. Surely a good challenge is to get back to your former glories and sending us great videos of your Northern runs.

Was the buzz for you running certain grades/rapids and ticking them off as a measure of where you are or are you happy to be on the river in good company, great scenery and enjoying the whole experience of the river. If its the former then maybe another sport calls for you, you will be missed on this forum for sure.
Brian Taylor
Paddle Pirates

User avatar
banzer
Posts: 3307
Joined: Thu May 05, 2005 11:37 pm
Location: Harrogate, Yorkshire
Has thanked: 3 times
Been thanked: 3 times

Re: Dealing with loss of ability and drive

Post by banzer » Mon Jul 28, 2014 5:08 pm

Join the club! 37 and broken ankle a few years ago! 2 kids aged 9m and 3.

I don't get out that often but I still love it and try to every now and then. I would say I haven't lost ability and drive, but I have lost some paddling fitness (soon regained) and am not as ballsy as ten years ago. At my 'peak' (god knows when that was) I could paddle 4+ rivers and run the odd five. Now I would still do grade 4 rivers and still have the odd crack at 5. ('Easy' 5 like Fairy Falls!) I still have ambitions, things I would like to do. For instance last summer I soloed a possibly unrun limestone gorge in the twilight after work. So there's still plenty out there just half a level down from your 'peak'. Join me on a remote Scotland mission this Autumn if you want to see what the old gits get up to! :-)
A. Boater wrote:It's all Pierre's fault
www.neviscanoes.co.uk

User avatar
Neptune
Posts: 722
Joined: Tue Jan 29, 2008 4:13 pm
Location: Doncaster
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 1 time

Re: Dealing with loss of ability and drive

Post by Neptune » Mon Jul 28, 2014 5:31 pm

Lancs_lad,

23 years ago I injured both knees very badly in a judo competition resulting in 10 months waiting for surgery on both knees and as a result have no cartilage in either knee. I then had ten weeks in plaster followed by six months of intensive physiotherapy five days a week before a graduated return to work and then back onto the judo mat.

23 years on my knees creek a bit and if I have a big walk out or walk in it can cause a bit of discomfort and pain the following day.

14 years ago I badly dislocated my right shoulder training with the British Judo squad prior to them flying out to the Sydney Olympic Games. This time I had nearly three years out with intensive physiotherapy and electro-therapy at St. James Hospital in Leeds the help repair nerve damage in my right arm and shoulder.

I am happy to say that I let neither of these serious injuries stop me participating in sport. I am back doing judo and participating in competitive judo at a national level. I started kayaking again with my son 33 years after I last got into a boat whilst at school and have loved it ever since.

Like you I like to push myself and constantly want to paddle harder stuff, improve my paddling skills and ability. I don’t think I do too badly for a man of 55 who only gets to paddle every other weekend when really I would like to be out every weekend, both days, and out two or three night a week at either HPP or Tees Barrage in the summer or on the river when the lighter nights allow it. But I am married and have to compromise.

Don’t let your current state of health and healing put you off and don’t push too hard too soon. The one thing I am glad I did following both injuries, was to listen to the medical professionals, follow their advice and guidance regarding my recovery and allow myself to ease back into sport at a pace that did not result in causing permanent impairment because I did not allow myself to heal properly.

Diamond Dave (Dave Burne) is a classic example of how you should not let an injury effect your efforts to get back in a boat and have fun, http://www.ukriversguidebook.co.uk/foru ... =3&t=85441 just be patient and you will get back to where you were. What’s important is that when you do get back in a boat you have fun and enjoy yourself and don’t let age be a barrier.

Peter

User avatar
DaveBland
Posts: 3657
Joined: Mon Jul 19, 2010 10:01 pm
Location: Calgary Canada
Has thanked: 4 times
Been thanked: 12 times

Re: Dealing with loss of ability and drive

Post by DaveBland » Mon Jul 28, 2014 6:15 pm

If you want it, it'll be there. Keeping fitness is the main thing.
I had a pretty much 10 year break from about your age to mid 40s.
Moved to Canada and the draw of the rivers was way too stong to not paddle.
In reality, I'm paddling better [certainly harder/bigger] than ever before. That's partly due to advances in boats, but age/time off is no restriction.
I'm not far off 49 now and despite the odd lack of confidence/ doubt, the drive is still there.
I don't want to 'calm down' yet, and suspect it'll be my rapidly falling apart body that slows me not my drive.

Pretty much my first run back in a boat after the break was the middle Elk in big flows [That's the trip the pic is of on the rail-track walk in]. I soon discovered that paddling fitness was an issue. I think I rolled 5 times, but the instincts were there.
Point is, the skills don't go away. Sure they blunt a bit, but that soon comes back. If you love it, which I'm sure you do, you'll be back.
First 'proper' day on the river and you'll be re hooked...
dave

kayak1
Posts: 1582
Joined: Thu Sep 29, 2005 9:51 pm

Re: Dealing with loss of ability and drive

Post by kayak1 » Mon Jul 28, 2014 7:37 pm

I am 52 years old (God that looks old in writing) and have been slowing down in confidence in paddling big water or rivers I was iffy about...since my mid 40's. I enjoy surf, as I have easy access to many beaches here in South Wales, But I decided that I was going to paddle only what I enjoyed and in what boats I liked as well, this gave me a new zest and fun to the sport. My confidence is back knowing what it is I want from the sport, even sold my newer playboats to go back to the older ones where I had so many great times and relive the moments...People often come up to me while surfing and say that I should be using a surf boat and not a WW playboat .. but the point is I have owned some Surf boats and have found I have so much more fun in what I'm using now and its about what you enjoy doing that matters, that's where you will get the Confidence from as well as the drive that doesn't put you off the sport...And if injury is part of the problem, try other watercraft which has already been mentioned to remain afloat..

User avatar
Lancs_lad
Posts: 1417
Joined: Fri Apr 21, 2006 8:41 pm
Location: Lancaster

Re: Dealing with loss of ability and drive

Post by Lancs_lad » Mon Jul 28, 2014 9:13 pm

DaveBland wrote: First 'proper' day on the river and you'll be re hooked...
This is what I am hoping. On the plus side i haven't missed a great deal in the UK as it has been a very dry past 7 months.

tobym
Posts: 197
Joined: Sun May 20, 2012 9:25 pm
Location: Cardiff
Been thanked: 1 time

Re: Dealing with loss of ability and drive

Post by tobym » Tue Jul 29, 2014 10:21 am

Lancs Lad,
I started paddling 2 years ago, after giving up climbing, because I broke my ankle. My broken ankle also meant that I probably won't run again. I guess I am lucky, with my lack of ability, that my ankle doesn't limit my paddling at all. Keep at it and I am sure your range of motion and strength likely to get back to normal levels, as with any sports injury, accept that you need to lower your expectations for a while as this is the RECOVERY period, still, but no reason to write yourself off, completely!

User avatar
thetangoman
Posts: 585
Joined: Fri Feb 27, 2004 11:06 am
Location: Hertfordshire
Contact:

Re: Dealing with loss of ability and drive

Post by thetangoman » Tue Jul 29, 2014 11:27 am

I have been through something similar over the last few years. Changing life circumstance (got married and went travelling with my wife) meant that I didn't manage to do any boating for almost two years. Part of this was a conscious decision and part of it was due to a lot of other commitments taking the time I would have liked to use to go paddling.

Since returning from travelling, I made two conscious decisions:
1 - to take my time
2 - not to force anything

Firstly, I didn't want to immediately go back out paddling with my usual paddling mates who have continued to paddle at a good level whilst I have been away. I wanted to ease myself back into it by effectively re-learning to paddle on easier water rather than just jumping back into harder WW (which would have been likely to cause me pain and knock my confidence). I wanted to take time to get my basic boat handling skills back before potentially stepping up to harder WW.

Secondly, when I started paddling again, I wasn't going to force myself to do it if I wasn't enjoying it. Kayaking has been a large part of my life for the last 15 years and I would have no regrets if things didn't work out. Life changes, so does what we enjoy doing. I know that my appetite for risk has diminished over the past few years and I don't see this as a bad thing. WW paddling is a risky sport, and for me the risk has to be worth it for me to want to do it. If I am not enjoying it, then I am not going to put myself at what I would see as unnecessary risk. However, if it turned out that I did still enjoy paddling, then that is a great outcome. If I decide that I don't want to continue paddling at the moment, there would be nothing stopping me from trying again in the future.

I was concerned that, like you, if I wasn't pushing or testing myself, then I wouldn't enjoy it. So far I have only had one session in a boat since travelling, and that was on the legacy course at LVWWC. I was uncertain of how I was feeling as the time got closer, but it felt great to be back on the water in my boat, with some good friends. I spent the session just practicing my basic boating skills - something I would rarely make time for previously - and ended the session with a smile on my face. I think that, for me, that is what boating is about - having a great time with friends. I just have to find out what kind of paddling that will be on.

I am now looking forward to getting back out again, and it will still be on the legacy course (or equivalent). In the future, I might push myself on harder WW, but only time will tell.

Andy

RizzRat
Posts: 113
Joined: Wed Jul 27, 2011 8:53 am

Re: Dealing with loss of ability and drive

Post by RizzRat » Tue Jul 29, 2014 3:49 pm

Generally p!ssing people off since 1984!

SimonMW
Posts: 2194
Joined: Sat Jul 24, 2010 11:39 pm
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 7 times

Re: Dealing with loss of ability and drive

Post by SimonMW » Tue Jul 29, 2014 4:24 pm

I think that, for me, that is what boating is about - having a great time with friends. I just have to find out what kind of paddling that will be on.
Personally I think that this is an aspect that is all too often forgotten in favour of pushing the grades. I think it is unfortunate that G3 is often simply seen as a stepping stone to G4 and then on to G5.

For me kayaking has never been about adrenaline or pushing myself. I simply enjoy being outside on a river in good company. Sometimes I think it is good to go back to the basics from a beginners perspective to rediscover what was the thing that got you hooked in the first place. I think it's a shame though if that is simply adrenaline or pushing physical abilities.

Maybe try a different discipline like OC1. Or if you really want to challenge yourself try slalom, which is very difficult and challenging to learn and get good at, even on what would normally be considered lower grades of G2-3.

Rdscott
Posts: 1209
Joined: Mon Aug 27, 2007 4:53 pm
Location: Huddersfield

Re: Dealing with loss of ability and drive

Post by Rdscott » Tue Jul 29, 2014 5:10 pm

I Smashed my shoulder up and it took me 4 years to get back to paddling where i was before, my confidence was right and my attitude was edging on the right amount of caution.

just as i reached this level my surgery date came through,Im now 12 weeks after my surgery and have 75% mobility but no strength. i feel the same but am keeping my drive for getting back to where I was, I have done it before.

Kids don't need to mean taking all your time , work out a routine so the mother has them and you get a day of and vice versa. quality time with family is important but quality time away is just as important to recuperate and for a healthy relationship.

LucyLou19
Posts: 506
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 2010 5:04 pm
Been thanked: 1 time

Re: Dealing with loss of ability and drive

Post by LucyLou19 » Thu Jul 31, 2014 12:09 am

Best Quote- 'best paddler on the water is the one with the biggest smile on their face :) '

If kayaking still makes you smile, go and do it. But before jumping on the big stuff, I'd give a go at having just a good day on the river with your friends. Go to the treweryn or the washburn or something in the sunshine and make all your old favourite moves, and then try it backwards. And smile, take photos and be out there with your friends. Then you will remember why you like kayaking. Don't worry about the loss in skill, it doesn't take long to remember. Your real friends will help you with your boat, or help you get out if you have lost feeling in your ankle, and give you whiskey if your ankle hurts :)

Failing that, Climbing is good fun, and way less frustrating in British Weather!

BaldockBabe
Posts: 576
Joined: Thu Oct 25, 2007 11:55 am
Location: Hertfordshire
Contact:

Re: Dealing with loss of ability and drive

Post by BaldockBabe » Thu Jul 31, 2014 9:46 am

I think I can understand what you are going through to some degree. I broke my leg at Lee Valley (yup, that was me) and this resulted in a huge confidence loss on the water in two ways: one was the paddling, I had always been happy and comfortable on the water knowing that if the worse happens I would swim to the side and get back in my boat; and the second was in the water, I have been able to swim for longer than I could walk and have therefore never felt "helpless" in the water but when I broke my leg for the first time ever I was unable to rescue myself properly.

Other than a trip to Nepal where I had to get myself back in the game I found that going back to a venue that I had been very comfortable at (HPP) and starting to play on the familiar features was a way of getting my confidence back. It took time and some very patient friends for me to start playing rather than just running down the course but I am getting there...

I don't think I will get to the level I was at before but it doesn't really worry me as I still have a good group of friends that re willing to paddle with me and for me the friends have always been a more important part of paddling than the paddling iteslf.

User avatar
Lancs_lad
Posts: 1417
Joined: Fri Apr 21, 2006 8:41 pm
Location: Lancaster

Re: Dealing with loss of ability and drive

Post by Lancs_lad » Thu Jul 31, 2014 2:55 pm

LucyLou19 wrote:Best Quote- 'best paddler on the water is the one with the biggest smile on their face :) '

If kayaking still makes you smile, go and do it. But before jumping on the big stuff, I'd give a go at having just a good day on the river with your friends. Go to the treweryn or the washburn or something in the sunshine and make all your old favourite moves, and then try it backwards. And smile, take photos and be out there with your friends. Then you will remember why you like kayaking. Don't worry about the loss in skill, it doesn't take long to remember. Your real friends will help you with your boat, or help you get out if you have lost feeling in your ankle, and give you whiskey if your ankle hurts :)

Failing that, Climbing is good fun, and way less frustrating in British Weather!
Friends? I only have people I use as stepping stones on my way to the top! Haha

User avatar
morsey
Posts: 6275
Joined: Wed Jan 22, 2003 12:36 pm
Location: West Country :-)
Been thanked: 2 times

Re: Dealing with loss of ability and drive

Post by morsey » Thu Jul 31, 2014 4:18 pm

Take drugs, get strong. rebuild the inner mantra, worry about paddling when you are back standing face to face with a rapid, try not to break yourself again.

User avatar
Sickboy
Posts: 822
Joined: Sun May 17, 2009 4:44 pm
Location: se london

Re: Dealing with loss of ability and drive

Post by Sickboy » Wed Aug 06, 2014 11:28 pm

LucyLou19 wrote:
Failing that, Climbing is good fun, and way less frustrating in British Weather!
Thats global warming for you, all I seem to remember of climbing trips is sitting around waiting for the rain to stop and then trotting through sopping bogs to get to the crag to find all the routes you wanted to do were dripping green ooze....or suffering chalk asphyxiation at the climbing wall. Did enjoy exploring sea cliffs, especially the chalk down Dover way, wheres my ice axes?
Rum and coke, best served by the pint.

User avatar
DaveBland
Posts: 3657
Joined: Mon Jul 19, 2010 10:01 pm
Location: Calgary Canada
Has thanked: 4 times
Been thanked: 12 times

Re: Dealing with loss of ability and drive

Post by DaveBland » Mon Aug 25, 2014 6:54 am

So Lancs… you got the urge yet?
Rain's a comin'...
dave

User avatar
Lancs_lad
Posts: 1417
Joined: Fri Apr 21, 2006 8:41 pm
Location: Lancaster

Re: Dealing with loss of ability and drive

Post by Lancs_lad » Mon Aug 25, 2014 4:14 pm

I managed to drag myself down a low/med troutbeck the other week. I enjoyed it but wanted more water. Oh and to top it off when pulling away to go home my OS drive shaft went on my T5!!!

No rain hitting the lakes until possibly Thursday/Friday. I'll get out if I can.

User avatar
DaveBland
Posts: 3657
Joined: Mon Jul 19, 2010 10:01 pm
Location: Calgary Canada
Has thanked: 4 times
Been thanked: 12 times

Re: Dealing with loss of ability and drive

Post by DaveBland » Mon Aug 25, 2014 4:34 pm

Great. Troutbeck is the best cure for all woes.
dave

nomorfkindhalbhat
Posts: 248
Joined: Sat Mar 20, 2010 11:34 am
Location: Farnham, surrey

Re: Dealing with loss of ability and drive

Post by nomorfkindhalbhat » Mon Aug 25, 2014 6:56 pm

Hi all, just caught up with this thread.
One thing I would agree with is don,t push it, if the desire is there go for it, if not wait for it to comeback, ive had a very chequerd canoeing career. young tiger out every weekend, got into expeditions and discoverd warm water and paddling in the sun and found it hard to get back into cold uk rivers, kids arrived and spent weekends taxi-ing and standing on football touchlines and work became more intense, while mates were jumping all over the globe. Every now and then somewhere would catch my attention and I,d get out regulaly and train towards the trip, it didn,t take long to get back to my usual poor standard, once i came home I,d sort of lose interest, sometimes i left kayaking alone for a year and never missed it, but the buzz of another trip always pulled me back.
Now the kids are gone I find Im strangly spending more time back on are good old freezing UK ditches and enjoying it as much as ever.

I think reading between the lines the germ of kayaking is working inside you like a relapsing fever, I fear my friend that like me you may have a life sentence.

Nick

User avatar
banzer
Posts: 3307
Joined: Thu May 05, 2005 11:37 pm
Location: Harrogate, Yorkshire
Has thanked: 3 times
Been thanked: 3 times

Re: Dealing with loss of ability and drive

Post by banzer » Mon Aug 25, 2014 9:05 pm

nomorfkindhalbhat wrote:it didn,t take long to get back to my usual poor standard,
Ha ha... me neither!
A. Boater wrote:It's all Pierre's fault
www.neviscanoes.co.uk

Post Reply

Return to “Whitewater and Touring”