Cray fish

Inland paddling
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lisa c
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Cray fish

Post by lisa c »

A friend sent me this eamil and i thought it would be advantages to post it up so that everyone knows the deal.

Signal Crayfish found in the Derwent Catchment

A member of the public has reported to the Environment Agency in Penrith seeing a crayfish in the St Johns Beck (Derwent Catchment) near Threlkeld. No crayfish (native or non-native) were previously known to occur in this catchment.

Environment Agency staff from fisheries and FRB (Fisheries, Recreation and Biodiversity) have confirmed that non-native signal crayfish are present. Over thirty individuals have been recovered so far and it is confirmed that the population occupies at least 600m of St Johns Beck which is an important salmon spawning area. Further investigations are ongoing into the extent of the infestation and the source.

This is the first time signal crayfish have been recorded in Cumbria and anyone who thinks they may have seen a crayfish in any of the tributaries of the River Derwent is urged to contact the Environment Agency immediately (0800 807060).

Cumbrian rivers and becks support some of the last remaining populations of the native white clawed crayfish. Crayfish plague (caused by the fungus Aphanomyces astaci) has caused drastic losses of native crayfish in rivers in England. It is believed that this disease was introduced and is spread by the most frequently farmed species, the signal crayfish a carrier of the disease.

Crayfish plague is spread by spores that are specific to crayfish but can be transferred between rivers not only by crayfish but also by fish, water, mud or equipment that has been in water where signals crayfish are present.

Preventing the spread of crayfish plague.
As the spores remain viable only when damp, complete drying of equipmentthat has been in contact with water or sediments is an effective way of
killing them.

(This is probably the easiest and best way to help / prevent spread of crayfish plague - wash boats with tap water and allow to completely dry out (UV kills plague spores). Also please consider the order of rivers paddled. Please paddle the Derwent Catchment rivers last (Eden, Leven
and Kent rivers first) and then wash all kit thoroughly.)

in summary The most important info is:
This is probably the easiest and best way to help / prevent spread of crayfish plague - wash boats with tap water and allow to completely dry out (UV kills plague spores). Also please consider the order of rivers paddled. Please paddle the Derwent catchment rivers last (Eden, Leven
and Kent rivers first) and then wash all kit thoroughly.

UPDATED INFO

They are also present on Derwent water and Thirlmere. assume that this means Bassenthwaite as well guys.

these aren't cool things for us to be transporting around us please be very very careful guy's and gals

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Adrian Cooper
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Post by Adrian Cooper »


lisa c
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Post by lisa c »

Ok. I had had a quick look through past posts before I posted this up and I had not seen this other post. Never mind I suppose it cant hurt to remind people. Can it?

Steve B
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Post by Steve B »

Sorry, the Search facility only works for very recent posts. We've had to disable the full archive search because of a server limitation - it'll be fixed eventually, but not in the short term.
Steve Balcombe

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Adrian Cooper
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Post by Adrian Cooper »

Yes, interesting Steve since when i saw Lisa's post, I tried to search for the older one to see if there was anything new. Searching with 'crayfish' and 'Eden' gave no useful response other that Lisa's recent post.

Mike J Kelly
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Post by Mike J Kelly »

Can we eat these critters?

Mike

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Post by Steve B »

I've eaten native British crayfish, it used to be quite easy to find them just by looking under stones in shallow moving water. But that was in the 1970s. Don't know about these new-fangled ones though.
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Adrian Cooper
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Post by Adrian Cooper »

Saw some in the Tarn (France) a little while ago, we got off and went to a bar where we saw a few locals eating from a large bowl of them. Just don't get caught eating the native ones!

lisa c
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Post by lisa c »

dont know if i would really fancy eating one to be honest but maybe if we all started eating them we could completly wipe them out of the rivers. What are our chances?

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Mark R
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Post by Mark R »

This has pictures of the little critters...

http://www.ukriversguidebook.co.uk/crayfish.doc
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*Guy*
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Post by *Guy* »

I've eaten Signal crayfish and mighty fine they were too, I expect you'd get a smacked wrist for eating the native ones though. I believe you need a licence to catch them, but I think, by some legislative quirk its free. I think the post office is the place to get them, check the EA website...

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waverley610
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Post by waverley610 »

Mike J Kelly wrote:Can we eat these critters?

Mike
Absolutely, I've eaten Surrey's finest crayfish, but they were 'introduced' and had become a pest to the pond owner, so probably not native.

Put them in cold water in the sink for 48 hours to rinse out, you might need a lid as they do try to climb out. If they start to go lifeless they need oxygen so put your finger on the tap and give them a good blast of whitewater to wake them up again.

Fry lots of finely chopped garlic and shallots, add a bottle of dry white wine and lots of parsley bring to a fierce boil; drop the crayfish in all together,
they will die immediately and soon turn from ugly blue to a beautiful lobster pink. Serve with crusty french bread.

Bon Apetite.

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callwild
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Cleaning

Post by callwild »

But as all canoeists and kayakers are self righteous, self proclaimed outdoor environmentalists the important questiions are;

Is everyone who paddles the Greta disinfecting their boats before going on another river?
Is it practical?
Will it last?
Does everyone who paddles the Greta know about this warning.

I reckon I can answer all these questions with a NO.

Stuart Miller

lisa c
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Post by lisa c »

I agreee with this all though we should recently asked my friend this question who is a really experienced paddler and should know better, however he replied that he would not be doing this. Hence getting a slap from me but still its important guys. I was thinking along the lines of people may deny access to canoeists and water users if we are spreading the disease. Its not hard to kill so please make the effort.

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