Paddle Help for a New Member to suit Pyranha H3

From the Warwickshire Avon in the south, to the Trent in the north
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maxhouston
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Joined: Thu May 26, 2011 8:56 pm

Paddle Help for a New Member to suit Pyranha H3

Post by maxhouston » Thu May 26, 2011 11:02 pm

Hello, Im pretty new to Kayaking, Ive had a Perception Pirouette for about 3 yrs but only really tackled the Trent & canal's. After Tuesday when i kayaked Nottingham to Newark, ive probably clocked 48 hrs of paddle time.

Im looking to join a club and get my bcu and tackle some white water.

I have a Pyranna H3 245, im 5ft 10" and am now looking for a suitable paddle to help me on my way.

(oh and a deck too)

Id be greatful for any advice and recco's on a paddle, budget is an issue so nothing ott. Im in Long Eaton & if anyone fancies a paddle feel free to get in touch.

Thanks

Matt

jonny----5
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Joined: Wed Jun 22, 2011 11:06 pm
Location: MIDLANDS

Re: Paddle Help for a New Member to suit Pyranha H3

Post by jonny----5 » Wed Jun 29, 2011 7:19 pm

hey mat,

there are a few clubs in notts and around your area,you also have the national whitewater centre in notts but from memory you have to be a 3* to use it but i think you can pay for some coaching at the centre to get you up to speed...paddle wise just go for a cheap carbon straight shaft to start with mate it will last you ages while you get some time on the river and take a good hammering...you should be able to get a cheap deck and paddle from one of the shops in notts or there is also a shop by the white water centre.
happy paddling !

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Mark Thompson
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Location: Cheltenham
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Re: Paddle Help for a New Member to suit Pyranha H3

Post by Mark Thompson » Mon Oct 10, 2011 7:49 pm

You should see if you can try a few and then you can buy both what you like and the best you can afford. I would look in the comunity sales section of this site for a good deal. I started off with fiber glass shafted paddles. If you can afford buy kevlar they are stronger, but glass are also a good paddle. Aluminum are the cheapest and cold to use in winter also much heaver than the other two and commonally bend.

Next if you can afford you may want to buy cranks but not everyone gets along with these, but they are designed to provide more power and ease presure on your wrists. STaraight safts are good and length is sometime a issue. As a guide the shorter paddles are designed for play boating and surfing so you have quick movement. Long padddles are for speed like marathon racing or sea kayaking over long distances. I use around 197.

Next is the blade, do you want thin blades or foam core (thicker blades). Thin can sometime flutter in the water, while filled cores are heavier and if dented sometimes need repairs and filling. Foam core are more expensive. Good glass blades are powerful and will do you well. They can chip on the edges, but are better than plastic blades that are much heavier.

I have severial sets of blades and prefer my crank werners shoguns but some of my friends dont like these as they are short and heavy. I also like ATC's which are solidly built, agin bnot everyone gets along with these. There are plenty of paddles out there. Werner sell alot of paddles and so do other companies. Like most kayaking kit people will have a favourite. If your money is tight second hand paddles can mean you get a far more expensive paddle than you could buy new. Having said that we all like new items including paddles. H2O paddles are up and coming and at the cheaper end of the middle market are ok, as are Rough Stuff and Robson who all make some good paddles.

To recap, try a few, even ask paddlers at a sight if you can just try trheir kit until you find somethink you like. Good luck and hope this helps.
Mark Thompson
(Outdoor Performance Coaching).

GenericName
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Joined: Thu May 03, 2012 10:20 pm

Re: Paddle Help for a New Member to suit Pyranha H3

Post by GenericName » Sat May 12, 2012 11:35 am

I've heard a few different things about long and short paddles. If you're going to paddle efficiently, shouldn't the geometry be the same - regardless of what water/distance you are paddling? If you want to go slower, shouldn't you just do the same action (near vertical, strong box, good trunk rotation) more slowly? (These aren't - quite - rhetorical questions!)

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