Canoe - Alaska

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MerseyView
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Location: Liverpool

Canoe - Alaska

Post by MerseyView » Sun Jun 28, 2009 2:23 pm

Hi,

Can anyone recommend a multi day wilderness canoe tour in Alaska or can you point me to any companies, outfitters, guides etc who offer trips.

Google isn't giving me much to play with.

Thanks

davyc01
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Joined: Tue Apr 21, 2009 3:16 pm

Re: Canoe - Alaska

Post by davyc01 » Sun Jul 12, 2009 6:42 pm

You might struggle to find this in Alaska. I went to Kodiak Island two years ago and didn't recall seeing any outfitters offering canoe trips, there were some doing kayak day trips. Most outfitters there focus on fishing and hunting as that is where the money is.

I've just got back from a trip to Canada and it is clear that nearly all the outfitters are very small companies and can't afford the investment of a web site, so google isn't much help.

One idea is to look at web sites for float plane companies in the area you are interested in. These are bigger operations and usually have a web site with email links. If you then email them they will probably be able to put you in touch with an outfitter that does canoe trips as well. If you don't want a guided tour the float plane copmpanies will fly you in and pick you up. They know their areas very well and good give you some advice on trips.

Have you tried Alaska State Parks? Most of the big wilderness areas are under their control and they may be able to put you in touch with suitable outfitters. Also if the area you want to visit is a state park yyou will need a permit.

One bit of advice about bears. If you are not used to being in grizzly country then stick to the coastal areas such as Katmai park. Coastal grizzlies are bigger but generally more passive as there is plenty of food. As you go in land there is less food and the bears tend to have a more agressive attitude as they need to fdefend food sources. That said bears will usually do all they can to get out of your way.

MerseyView
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Re: Canoe - Alaska

Post by MerseyView » Mon Aug 31, 2009 3:34 pm

Cheers for the reply and sorry for the delay in response...have had a mad few weeks including a paddling trip to Sweden :) I will contact the State parks authority to see if they have any information.

Thanks for the advice on the bears we do have some experience on multiday camp trips in bear country (Black and Brown) specifically British Columbia. We usually ask the local outdoor outfitters and ranger station on the bear situation before embarking on our trips. It always good to get a heads up on the recent bear activity and any unusual character changes ie the natural food situation, recent conflicts with people/towns/campers/hunters etc. I always remember the news reports from a few years back concerning the aggressive nature of the Kodiak Island Brown bears (coastal) back in the early 2000's the berry crop and salmon run failed due to a harsh winter. Numerous bears were shot dead on the isalnd that year directly inconflict with humans and several outdoor enthusiasts were also killed by the bears the first bear related deaths in about 50 years or so on the island. That story sticks in my mind so we always do our best to find out the current bear activity reports.

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active4seasons
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Re: Canoe - Alaska

Post by active4seasons » Thu Sep 24, 2009 7:51 pm

We were out in Alaska in July sea kayaking the Inside passage and met Brenda Schwartz from Wrangell. I would talk to them about the Stikine - they have a jet boat that could get you up stream for an adventure I imagine she or her partner would know where to get open canoes:
http://www.alaskaupclose.com/about.php
Thank,
Ollie
Developing Desire for Adventure!

Anorak
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Re: Canoe - Alaska

Post by Anorak » Thu Sep 24, 2009 8:23 pm

From researching Nahanni outfitters I know these people offer Alaskan trips: http://www.nahanni.com/tripsearch/?craft=Canoe and Blackfeather do custom trips to the Stikine. No personal experience.

Matt John
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Re: Canoe - Alaska

Post by Matt John » Tue Sep 29, 2009 6:36 am

Canoeing is the activity of paddling a canoe for the purpose of recreation (also called a float trip), sport, or transportation. It usually refers exclusively to using a paddle to propel a canoe with only human muscle power. A kayak is propelled using a paddle with two blades where paddlers sit with their legs mostly extended in front of them, whereas canoes are propelled using single- or double-bladed paddles where the paddler - a "canoeist" or "canoer"- is kneeling or sitting on seat or thwart, with their knees bent and their legs more or less beneath them. Kayaks are usually closed-decked boats with a spraydeck, while canoes are usually open boats. There are also open kayaks and closed canoes. Technically, a kayak can be seen as a special kind of canoe. When exactly a canoe can be called a kayak is difficult to determine though, and often arbitrary. Internationally, the term canoeing is used as a generic term for both forms though the terms "paddle sports" or "canoe/kayak" are also used. In North America, however, 'canoeing' usually refers only to canoes, as opposed to both canoes and kayaks. Paddling a kayak is also referred to as kayaking.

Open canoes may be 'poled' (punted), sailed, 'lined and tracked' (using ropes) or even 'gunnel-bobbed'.

In modern canoe sport, canoes and kayaks are classified together, although these watercraft have different designs, and historical uses. Both canoes and kayaks may be closed-decked. Other than by the minimum competition specifications (typically length and width (beam) and seating arrangement it is difficult to differentiate most competition canoes from the equivalent competition kayaks. The most common difference is that competition kayaks are always seated and paddled with a double-bladed paddle, and competition canoes are generally kneeled and paddled with a single-bladed paddle. Exceptions include Canoe Marathon (in both European and American competitive forms) and sprint (high kneeling position). The most traditional and early canoes did not have seats, the paddlers merely kneeled on the bottom of the boat. Recreational canoes and kayaks employ seats and whitewater rodeo and surf variants increasingly employ the use of 'saddles' to give greater boat control under extreme conditions.

When i was on travel to Alaska, i also enjoyed paddling;

Thanks

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bushpaddler
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Re: Canoe - Alaska

Post by bushpaddler » Wed Oct 07, 2009 8:57 pm

Hi,

Try Peter Kamper, a little noth of Fairbanks. German guy, living there for 25 Years:
http://www.angelfire.com/de/kanualaska/

We did 2 trips with his support:
Beaver Creek
http://www.bushpaddler.de/beavercreek.htm

Chandalar River
http://www.bushpaddler.de/chandalarriver.htm

Say Hello from Florian and Martina if you contact him...

Florian
Keep the open side up

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