Cooking on exped^

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Cooking on exped^

Postby MikeB » Thu Jan 19, 2012 1:06 pm

Came across this via Alpkits F/book page - http://www.alpkit.com/spotlight/winter-chef and also this - http://guyropegourmet.com/ - which prompts me to ask what other recipies / meal ideas / cooking techniques do folk have?

The open paddlers like their food as well - http://www.songofthepaddle.co.uk/forum/ ... ons-Please!

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Re: Cooking on exped

Postby liquidusblue » Thu Jan 19, 2012 1:44 pm

Some of these things haven't been too bad in the past...

http://www.jetboil.com/recipes

I find the key thing is a compact but reasonable selection of spices then you can make anything you want more edible!
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Re: Cooking on exped

Postby Kayaks'N'Beer » Thu Jan 19, 2012 5:36 pm

I don't even attempt to cook on expeds. Reason being camping pans are garbage, compared to the 8mm copper bottoms I have at home and there's no way in hell I'm taking along my IO-shens or fresh herbs or basically anything that I'd use for proper cooking. So I make up the grub before I go and freeze it in bags. Then all I have to use the stupid little stove and mickey mouse pans for is reheating which they're just about up to the job of.
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Re: Cooking on exped

Postby Rdscott » Thu Jan 19, 2012 6:37 pm

I eat very wellin exped

I seakayak in a groupeof 5 we take 2 stoves and 3 pans + a frying pan,(they are camp pans but teflon so easy to cook on, each night one of us will be head chef another econd the others get to relax. ifweneedmore cookersor stoves we have some soap to soap a pan up and put it on the fire.

for exaple 5 nights
1st night, istradition in our groupe thay we eat soup,tiger bread with chicken and humouse,this is our lazy meal,
2nd night,chilli con carnie with rice cheese,
3rd night,pasta with chicken,onions peppers etc
4th night curry
5th night stir fry.

doesnt sound all that amazing but we try and use fresh ingreadients when possible no jar'd ingreadients due to my snobbery for food,(growing up with parents as chefs) the last night would be done with cooked meats due to them lasting longer than fresh depending on the timeof the year.
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Re: Cooking on exped

Postby Kayaks'N'Beer » Thu Jan 19, 2012 6:48 pm

One thing that's really changed our lives the last couple of years is the discovery of tortilla wraps. We used to take bread or rolls for lunches and you know what it's like trying to keep a loaf or a bag of rolls in one piece when it's getting crammed into whatever little space you can find in a hatch. With wraps, however, they don't care - bend them, fold them, screw them up into a little ball, poke them down into tiny little spaces using your paddle shaft ... lo and behold, when it comes time to eat them, they still function as god intended. Fill them with anything you'd fill a buttie with, wrap them up and chow down.
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Re: Cooking on exped

Postby Rdscott » Thu Jan 19, 2012 7:05 pm

Tortilla wraps are deffinatly the future forlunches they fit nicley into the deck hatch cover, as dopitta breads on oval hatches not as easy touse though.

I started to take a expresso kettle as I was tiered of rubbish coffee out of a flask. Sea kayaking has made expeditions more comfertable, and I love it I still minimise on walking and biking expeds.
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Re: Cooking on exped

Postby MikeB » Thu Jan 19, 2012 7:20 pm

Kayaks'N'Beer wrote:I don't even attempt to cook on expeds. Reason being camping pans are garbage


I found a few things which revolutionised how I can cook under camp conditions:

Gas conversion for the Trangia - decent heat control.
Non-stick pots and fry pan!

For my MSR (which seldom sees use these days, thanks to the Trangia running on gas), getting some superb (but expensive) hard anodised / non stick MSR pots made a world of difference. The heat distribution is excellent and that helps stop food sticking and burning.

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Re: Cooking on exped

Postby Kayaks'N'Beer » Thu Jan 19, 2012 7:29 pm

Gotta be honest, even though I'm sure I could find solutions, I'm still not sure I'd want to proper cook on an exped. Too time consuming and it'd go through gas like nobody's business. We do eat well but I tend to concentrate on pre-making curries and stews and the like (all from scratch with fresh ingredients) which tend to taste better when they've been lying a while. I love cooking when I have a kitchen, hot and cold running water and all the utensils you can eat. Camp cooking, on the other hand, is endless compromise and just ends up frustrating me when I've got much more important things to be getting on with (guzzling beer to name just a few)

If exped cooking is your thing more power to ya but I prefer to reheat the good stuff than cook it on the hoof.
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Re: Cooking on exped

Postby atakd » Thu Jan 19, 2012 7:48 pm

+1 for Kayaks 'n' Beer

Cooking without a kitchen is like kayaking without a boat.
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Re: Cooking on exped

Postby Mark R » Thu Jan 19, 2012 8:04 pm

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Re: Cooking on exped

Postby Mike Mayberry » Thu Jan 19, 2012 8:21 pm

Mark R wrote:http://www.dominos.co.uk/store/locator.aspx


"Drive down the narrow lane to the beach, you will find me in the second tarp on the left, behind the blackberry bush I'm using as a windbreak" :)
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Re: Cooking on exped

Postby Jim » Thu Jan 19, 2012 8:25 pm

I could go on about kitchen primadonna's and workmen who blame the tools rather than working out how to use them, BUT ignoring all that nonsense:

Kayak'n'beers has hit the nail on the head - cooking 'properly' on a trip takes too long and too much fuel.
I can do it, but I would rather choose stuff that just needs a bit of reheating.

If you are a short distance midsummer camper, maybe you can afford the luxury of sitting around prepping and cooking.
When it comes to long distance spring and autumn trips it is nice to get the meal out of the way whilst there is still daylight so it needs to be quick and easy.
For winter touring, there is no question about it, the meal has to be something that will cook unattended in the time it takes to pitch the tent.
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Re: Cooking on exped

Postby MikeB » Thu Jan 19, 2012 8:33 pm

Mike Mayberry wrote:
Mark R wrote:http://www.dominos.co.uk/store/locator.aspx


"Drive down the narrow lane to the beach, you will find me in the second tarp on the left, behind the blackberry bush I'm using as a windbreak" :)


ROFLOL. "Do you deliver to the west coast of Jura?" Humour apart, iirc the cafe on Barra is sending take-aways by ferry to Eriskay and the like. Quite whether Calmac will do a stop off on somewhere along the coast has yet to be checked!

For me, part of the enjoyment of exped is producing tasty and well made food under camp conditions. That said, there is always a back-up plan involving a tin or a packet for when gently stirring a pleasing sauce just isnt going to happen! Once I've worked out how to grill on a Trangia, I'll be having a bash at the Hairy Biker's take on razorfish http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/chill ... azor_95428 - although the garlic mayo might get pre-prepped.

Mears does interesting things to salmon - something easy to replicate with a camp fire. Mike.
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Re: Cooking on exped

Postby andyE » Thu Jan 19, 2012 9:49 pm

Had these meet balls for tea with a 100g pasta. It needed a bit of salt and pepper, well a lot of pepper for me, very tasty about 500 cals in all. That would be very easy to cook on my 35 year old Trangia 25 (it's in need of new pans). A bit pricey for a long ex-bed but well worth it imo.
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Re: Cooking on exped

Postby Skerry Packer » Fri Jan 20, 2012 2:05 am

I have tucked into some of the pre made meals that Kayaks'N'Beer has brought along and I too have pre made the odd meal to take along, some times even visiting the local Indian take away for For the odd chicken tikka jaipuri with rice and nan for a first night tuck in. For me it is the way to go for a few days trip but if extended then you need to cook. The wraps are great but you can't beat the smell and taste of toast nor the smell of a nice meal cooking,for me it's all part of the outdoor experience. A quick fall back I do from time to time is a large tin of potatoes, jar of Bombay sauce, and within a few minutes a pot of Bombay potatoes,some rice and nan and away you go. pre making the dough for the nan is easy and keeps quite well, even one of the guys brought pre made bread dough and had bread on a stick over an open fire. It's all part of the fun,
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Re: Cooking on exped

Postby Mike Mayberry » Fri Jan 20, 2012 10:38 am

I struggle with time to cook on exped too. I often take the lazy way and use the boil in the bag meals. Pasta n sauce packets are ok, I dice a pork chop or chicken breast to throw in with it.

The tastiest thing I seem to eat is bacon and mushrooms cooked in butter, then thrown into a pan of super noodles. Not very imaginitive but it always tastes nice.

I'm following this thread with great interest, hoping that I will learn something much better!
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Re: Cooking on exped

Postby PeterG » Fri Jan 20, 2012 12:35 pm

To eat fresh food you need items that survive and thrive inside a hatch. Sweet potatoes for instance last indefinitely and cook quickly, don't need a dry bag so can be packed loose where-ever. Onions do pretty well, and for fruit, grapefruit seems the most resistant. Then a range of dry items; split lentils, curry/spice mix in a plastic container; cous cous, buckwheat, rice etc.. Other items, potatoes, courgettes etc are a soft and rotting mess after a couple of days and best avoided.
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Re: Cooking on exped

Postby Taran Tyla » Fri Jan 20, 2012 12:46 pm

I like to keep it easy. I use Wayfarer Vegetable Chilli & Curry (bit limiting being vegetarian), boil just enough water to make my cous cous & pop the wayfarer meal in the hot water covered for 10 mins. Then I reheat the water & make my cous cous with it & serve with tortillas, Perfect & makes for a happy camper :)
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Re: Cooking on exped

Postby Richard Barrett » Fri Jan 20, 2012 1:06 pm

Found these to be generally excellent and require little other than some pitta or couscous http://www.lookwhatwefound.co.uk/Page/index.aspx You can get them in some Sainsburys or buy oneline
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Re: Cooking on exped

Postby Kayaks'N'Beer » Fri Jan 20, 2012 3:56 pm

Another thing we've had a couple of times is army ration packs. Convenient to pack, keep forever, quick to cook and surprisingly tasty. Never found a reliable source, tho.
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Re: Cooking on exped

Postby Chris Denehy » Fri Jan 20, 2012 9:17 pm

Ration packs are for rucksacs, but heavens never in a sea kayak. With all that space there must be more to life!
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Re: Cooking on exped

Postby Lindisfarne » Fri Jan 20, 2012 11:09 pm

Richard Barrett wrote:Found these to be generally excellent and require little other than some pitta or couscous http://www.lookwhatwefound.co.uk/Page/index.aspx You can get them in some Sainsburys or buy oneline



I'll second that one. Check out their website. I had the free range chicken and sage soup today for lunch...........Num,num,num..!

No added E'ss or orrible preservatives.

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Re: Cooking on exped

Postby Mark R » Sat Jan 21, 2012 12:36 am

On long solo trips, I really don't have the energy at the end of the day, to do much other than heat up stuff, and then sleep.

My typical meal is something nice from http://www.lookwhatwefound.co.uk, alongside a bag of rice (the Uncle Ben's ones which come in pre-bagged portions).

However, if I want a change or feel a bit 'gourmet', I will try some combo of...packet Noodles (the ones from the Chinese supermarket, not nasty crap from Tescos), pesto stir-through sauces, tortellini (has meat in it), and most crucially, chorizo sausage. Chorizo is great both cold or cooked with anything, super-filling and transforms any old garbage into an actual meal. I can recall eating entire chorizo sausages in one go, whilst working my way up the NW of Scotland.
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Re: Cooking on exped

Postby Mark R » Sat Jan 21, 2012 12:40 am

Mark R wrote:something nice from http://www.lookwhatwefound.co.uk


Incidentally, my wife (who is boring enough to actually look this stuff up) tells me that in nutrition/ energy terms, these are utterly rubbish. On a multi-day river trip in Nepal last year, I cooked up these meals alongside hearty pots of rice, whilst she preferred to sit in the corner nursing bowls of barely edible powdered sh*te, which she claims contained much more energy ... http://www.mountainhouse.com/
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Re: Cooking on exped

Postby liquidusblue » Sat Jan 21, 2012 1:03 am

Mark R wrote: chorizo sausage. Chorizo is great both cold or cooked with anything, super-filling and transforms any old garbage into an actual meal. I can recall eating entire chorizo sausages in one go, whilst working my way up the NW of Scotland.


Second!, well not the eating in scotland part. But chorizo is for winners!

Mark R wrote:
Mark R wrote:something nice from http://www.lookwhatwefound.co.uk


Incidentally, my wife (who is boring enough to actually look this stuff up) tells me that in nutrition/ energy terms, these are utterly rubbish. On a multi-day river trip in Nepal last year, I cooked up these meals alongside hearty pots of rice, whilst she preferred to sit in the corner nursing bowls of barely edible powdered sh*te, which she claims contained much more energy ... http://www.mountainhouse.com/


I don't reckon energy is always the issue as usually I've been chomping on mars bars or something during the day. But I'm left feeling I need something with a bit of bulk!

Such as Chorizo!!!
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Re: Cooking on exped

Postby Debbie » Sat Jan 21, 2012 11:09 am

For expeditions in foreign countries greater than 14 to 20 days, I feel you must cook every evening. In some towns or villages that serve as your starting point, you can't always find dehydrated food or wayfarers pre-cooked meals. In fact, you are limited to the local food in the supermarkets. Basic staples such as rice, elbow macaroni (or other small shapes), and lentils are compact and provide a good source of carbs. Small tins such as tuna, sardines add protein, while dry packets of sauce and a small bottle of soy sauce add flavour. Catching fresh fish, such as cod or saithe in Norway adds to the experience and richness of the trip.

I love shopping in supermarkets in foreign countries. Greece has lovely chunks of dry bread that you soak in olive oil, Halva as a sweet snack, and honey to add to the water bottle. Norway has strong, dense, fermented rye bread that is filling and keeps for days and a good variety of sardines. The British Virgin Islands had a surprising amount of American brand foods. On both trips to Alaska we had a very bland diet for 20 days as we wanted to avoid attracting brown (grizzly) bears - no tuna or sardines.

I have to make a precise list as I don't want to spend all day there as it can be quite overwhelming standing in the aisle of a foreign supermarket. A typical shopping list (with some regional variation) for 20 days would look something like this:

2 kg of either muesli, or 60 pop tarts or 80 packets of instant quaker oats
1 kg of pasta
1 kg of rice
1 kg of lentils
10 packets of dried soup
60 tortilla wraps or bread product
60 cookies
1 jar of peanut butter
1 kg of cheese
10 tins sardines/tuna
10 packets of dried pasta sauce
1 bottle of soy sauce
40 energy bars
2 kg of dried fruit (raisins, apples or apricots) and nuts
60 tea bags
500 g sugar
500 g dried milk powder
500ml of olive oil

This is about the maximum we can fit into our Feathercraft K1s.

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Re: Cooking on exped

Postby andyE » Sat Jan 21, 2012 12:32 pm

for the lazy shopper and cook

http://rations.vesteyfoods.com/ration_p ... ?ptypeID=8

http://www.mreinfo.com/


Russian Army Rations, not for the fainthearted

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Re: Cooking on exped

Postby Mark R » Sat Jan 21, 2012 1:18 pm

Debbie wrote:For expeditions in foreign countries ... you can't always find dehydrated food or wayfarers pre-cooked meals.


This has been a real problem on WW trips to exotic places. Whilst we're all for the "When in Rome" approach, the problem is that you are going to get ill sooner or later from microbiological nasties in local food; the remoter the trip, the nastier the bugs. Paddling and portaging heavy-duty white water in jungle/ high altitude gorges with dodgy guts is not a lot of fun, and not being on top of your game seriously adds to the risk factor. Hence we've tended to keep eating nasty powdered stuff when perfectly reasonable looking food is available.

On the Thuli Bheri River a couple of years back, despite all due hygiene precautions, we simultaneously had the best of both worlds; godawful powdered food and liquid intestines.

http://southwestseakayaking.co.uk/2010/ ... ly-deeply/

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Re: Cooking on exped

Postby Douglas Wilcox » Sat Jan 21, 2012 1:22 pm

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We had been paddling along the remote Rhinns of Galloway peninsula for what seemed ages. Our stomachs were groaning with hunger pangs. At last we came across a break in the previously relentless rocks, Port of Spittal Bay. There appeared to be a house standing a little way back from the beach. We started drooling with the thought yhat perhaps we could beg some morsels of food.

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There was a little shore break...

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...but soon we were safely on the beach of coarse grey sand and shingle.

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Weak with hunger, our faltering steps took us up the beach towards the isolated house...

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...we opened the creaking door and stepped inside.

We were ever so surprised to discover it was actually a fully functional hotel.

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Even better, we discovered that it had a restaurant (though it only had a solitary Michelin star). Despite there just being just the two of us, the chef put on the full menu. We dined rather well that night.

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Re: Cooking on exped

Postby andyE » Sat Jan 21, 2012 1:32 pm

Douglas, a fine menu, but no price and no chips!! dare we ask how much, or did you have a lot of washing up to do ?
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